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Full text of "University of New Haven Graduate Bulletin, 1979-80"

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Graduate School 
1979-1980 




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http://www.archive.org/details/universityofne197980univ 






University of New Haven 

Graduate Bulletin 
1979-1980 



Main Campus: 

300 Orange Avenue 

West Haven, Connecticut 06516 



This bulletin supersedes all previous bulletins, catalogs and 
brochures published by the Graduate School and describes academic 
programs to be offered during 1979-1980. Graduate students admit- 
ted to the university in the fall of 1979 and thereafter are bound by the 
regulations published in this bulletin. 

The University of New Haven is committed to affirmative action 
and to a policy which provides for equal opportunity in employment, 
advancement, admission, educational opportunity and administration 
of financial aid to all persons on the basis of individual merit. This 
policy is administered without regard to race, color, national origin, 
age, sex, religion or disabilities not related to performance. The univer- 
sity is authorized under federal law to enroll nonimmigrant alien 
students. 

The university reserves the right to make, at any time, whatever 
changes in admission requirements, fees, charges, tuition, regulations 
and academic programs it deems necessary prior to the start of any 
class, term, semester, trimester or session. The university reserves the 
right to divide, cancel or reschedule classes or programs if enrollment 
or other factors so require. 

Bulletin of the University of New Haven, Volume II Number 6, May 1979 

The Bulletin of the University of New Haven is published eight times per year in Feb- 
ruary, April, May (2), July (2) and November (2) by the University of New Haven, 300 
Orange Avenue, New Haven, Connecticut 06516. Second class postage paid at New 
Haven, Connecticut. Publication number USPS 423-4 10. Postmaster: please send form 
3579 to Office of Public Relations, University of New Haven, P.O. Box 1306, New 
Haven, CT. 06505. 



Contents 

Academic Calendar vi 

General Information 1 

Map 23 

Student Activities and Other Services 25 

Academic Programs 39 

Accounting 40 

Business Administration 42 

Business Administration/Industrial Engineering dual degree 49 

Community Psychology 51 

Computer and Information Science 54 

Criminal Justice 56 

Electrical Engineering 58 

Environmental Engineering 60 

Environmental Sciences . . ., 62 

Executive M.B A 63 

Forensic Science 65 

Gerontology 67 

Humanities 69 

Industrial Engineering 70 

Industrial Relations 72 

Mechanical Engineering 74 

Operations Research 75 

Organizational /Industrial Psychology 77 

Public Administration 80 

Senior Professional Certificates 82 

Taxation 88 

Course Descriptions 93 

Board, Administration and Faculty 147 

Index 178 



ACADEMIC CALENDAR 
1979-1980 

Graduate School 



1979-80 

SUMMER TERM: Monday, July 16, to Tuesday, August 28, 1979 

Fall term deadline for completed 
applications for admission * August 1 

FALL TERM: Monday, September 10, to Saturday, December 15, 1979 

'Last day to register Friday, September 7 

Last day to add a class Monday, September 1 7 

Fall Holiday Monday, October 1 
Last day to file petition for 

graduation at January commencement Friday, October 12 

Thanksgiving vacation week Tuesday -Saturday, November 20-24 
Winter term deadline for completed 

applications for admission * December 1 

WINTER TERM: Wednesday, January 2, to Tuesday, April 1, 1980 

Last day to register Friday, December 2 1 , 1979 

Last day to submit grades for students expecting 

to graduate in January commencement Monday, January 7, 1980 

Last day to add a class Wednesday, January 9 

Commencement Sunday, January 20 

Holiday (President's Day) Monday, February 18 

(Monday classes will meet Friday, 

February 22) 
Last day to file petition for 

graduation at June commencement Friday, February 29 

Spring term deadline for completed 

applications lor admission * March 1 

SPRING TERM: Monday, April 7, to Saturday, July 5, 1980 

Last day to register Friday, April 4 

Last day to add a class Monday, April 1 4 



* Prospective students completing their applications alter 
this date may register (or one term as nonmatnculated 
students. This registration o( those whose applications 
are in process does not guarantee acceptance. 



Graduate /Undergraduate Day- 



Last day to submit grades for students expecting 

to graduate in June commencement 
Holiday (Memorial Day) 

(Monday classes will meet Friday, 

May 30) 
Commencement 
Holiday (Independence Day) 

(Friday classes will meet Saturday, 

July 5) 



Monday, May 12 
Monday, May 26 



Sunday, June 1 
Friday, July 4 



Undergraduate Day Division 



Summer semester 1979 



See calendar for Division of Evening Studies 
(Undergraduate) 



Fall semester 1979 



Tuition due 

Residence charge due 

Residence Hall opens 

Orientation for first year students 

Classes begin 

Last day to add courses 

Last day to petition for 

January graduation 
Last day to drop courses 
Holiday (Thanksgiving) 
Classes end 
Reading day 
Final Examinations 
Last day of semester 
Residence Hall closes 
Commencement 



Monday, August 6 

Monday, August 6 

Noon, Saturday, September 1 

Tuesday, September 4 

Wednesday, September 5 

Friday, September 14 

Friday, October 12 

Friday, October 19 

Thursday-Friday, November 22-23 

Thursday, December 13 

Friday, December 1 4 

Saturday-Friday, December 15-21 

Friday, December 21 

6:00 p.m., Saturday, December 22 

Sunday, January 20, 1980 



Spring semester 1980 



Tuition due 

Residence charge due 

Residence Hall opens 

Orientation for new students 

Classes begin 

Last day to add courses 



Monday, December 31 , 1979 

Monday, December 31 

Noon, Saturday, January 12, 1980 

Thursday, January 17 

Friday, January 18 

Friday, January 25 



Academic Calendar 



Holiday (President's Day) 
Last day to petition for 

June graduation 
Last day to drop courses 
Spring vacation 
Classes resume 
Holiday (Good Friday) 
Classes end 
Reading day 
Final Examinations 
Last day of semester 
Residence Hall closes 
Commencement 



Monday, February 18 

Friday, February 29 

Friday, February 29 

Saturday-Sunday, March 8-16 

Monday, March 17 

Friday, April 4 

Friday, May 2 

Monday, May 5 

Tuesday-Monday, May 6-12 

Monday, May 12 

6;00 p.m., Tuesday, May 13 

Sunday, June 1 



Division of Evening Studies 
(Undergraduate) 



Summer semester 1979 



Registration period 

Tuition due 

First term classes begin 

Holiday (Independence Day) 

First term final examinations 

Second term classes begin 

Second term final examinations 



Tuesday -Friday, May 29-Iune 8 

Monday, June 11 

Monday, June 11 

Wednesday, July 4 

Monday, July 16 

Thursday, July 19 

Wednesday, August 22 



Fall semester 1979 



Registration for current 
and former students 

Registration for new students 

Tuition due 

Classes begin 

Last day to add courses 

Last day to petition for 
January graduation 

Last day to drop courses 

Holiday (Thanksgiving) 

Classes end 

Final examinations 

Commencement 



Monday-Friday, August 13-24 

Tuesday-Wednesday, August 28-29 

Wednesday, September 5 

Wednesday, September 5 

Friday, September 14 

Friday, October 12 

Friday, October 19 

Wednesday -Sunday, November 21-25 

Friday, December 14 

Saturday-Friday, December 15-21 

Sunday, January 20, 1980 



Spring semester 1980 



Registration for current 
and former students 

Registration for new students 

Tuition due 

Classes begin 

Last day to add courses 

Holiday (President's Day) 

Last day to petition for 
June graduation 

Last day to drop courses 

Spring vacation 

Classes resume 

Holiday (Good Friday) 

Classes end 

Final examinations 

Commencement 



Undergraduate Everung 



Wednesday -Tuesday, January 2-8 

Tuesday -Wednesday, January 8-9 

Friday, January 1 1 

Friday, January 18 

Friday, January 25 

Monday, February 18 

Friday, February 29 

Friday, February 29 

Sunday-Sunday, March 9- 16 

Monday, March 17 

Friday, April 4 

Tuesday, May 6 

Wednesday -Tuesday, May 7-13 

Sunday, June 1 







1 


MLA 



GENERAL 
INFORMATION 

History of the university 

Since its founding in 1920, the University of New Haven has 
grown from a small junior college to a major, urban, coeducational in- 
dependent university. 

Begun as New Haven YMCA Junior College, a branch of North- 
eastern University, the college became New Haven College in 1926 
by an act of the Connecticut General Assembly. For nearly 40 years, 
the college held classes in space rented from Yale University. In Sep- 
tember 1958, the college completed construction of a classroom build- 
ing on Cold Spring Street, New Haven, for its daytime engineering 
building. 

That same year, the college received its first authorization from 
the Connecticut Legislature to offer the Bachelor of Science degree in 
fields of business accounting, management and industrial engineering. 

But though its student body on the new Cold Spring Street cam- 
pus numbered fewer than 200 persons, the college's facilities were fast 
becoming overcrowded. To meet the needs of the college and the local 
community, the Board of Governors purchased in 1960 the three 
buildings and 25 acres of land in West Haven which formerly be- 
longed to the New Haven County Orphanage. The combination of 
greatly increased classroom space and the four-year degree program 
sparked a period of tremendous growth in enrollment and facilities. In 
1961, the year after \he college moved to West Haven, \he graduating 
class numbered 75. Fifteen years later, tiiat figure had climbed to 
1,000. 

The acquisition of 28 acres of undeveloped land near tiie main 
campus in 1962 made possible the construction of playing tields, tennis 
courts and a new Physical Education- Auditorium Building. In October 



General Information 



1974, the Marvin K. Peterson Library on the Mam Campus opened to 
students. 

New Haven College received full accreditation of its bac- 
calaureate programs from the New England Association of Schools 
and Colleges in 1966, which enabled the college to work toward the 
achievement of one of its principal objectives: to provide leaders and 
professional personnel with an understanding of important cultural and 
scientific progress, and to encourage students to reach their maximum 
potential. 

In 1969, the college took a major step forward with the addition of 
the Graduate School. Initially offering programs in business adminis- 
tration and industrial engineering, the Graduate School expanded 
rapidly. Today, 20 programs and additional courses have pushed 
graduate enrollment to more than 2200. 

FROM COLLEGE TO UNIVERSITY 

On the fiftieth anniversary of the founding of the college, in 1970, 
New Haven College became the University of New Haven, reflecting 
the increased scope and the diversity of academic programs offered. 
Originally founded to meet a single distinct need in the New Haven 
community, the institution now ranks as a major academic institution of- 
fering programs in more than 50 different areas of study. This wide 
range of studies provides a total educational experience for University 
of New Haven students. 

In the past 19 years, the institution has grown from a small college 
with 1,000 part-time, undergraduate evening students to a diverse ur- 
ban university enrolling 9,000 full- and part-time, graduate, under- 
graduate and special students on the main campus in West Haven and 
at eight locations around the state. 

Today, \he university offers some 100 graduate and undergrad- 
uate degree programs in five schools: the Graduate School and the 
Schools of Arts and Sciences, Business Administration, Engineering 
and Professional Studies and Continuing Education. 

Undergraduate courses and programs are offered in West Haven 
on the main campus as well as on the Mitchell campus in New London 
and on the Saint Joseph's College campus in Hartford. 

Graduate courses and programs are offered in West Haven and in 
Greenwich, Danbury, Middlebury, Waterbury, Middletown, Groton 
and New London. 

The University of New Haven has continually expanded its course 
and program offerings. The university adopted a policy for the 1970's 
which, in part, directed particular attention to the educational needs of 
the people of the state of Connecticut through programs in both day 
and evening divisions that reflect the needs of the area and of the times. 



THE FUTURE 

Plans for the growth of the university center around the $12 



General Information 



million Campaign for Excellence, a multi-purpose campaign which 
calls for building construction, the endowment of scholarships, the ex- 
pansion of library resources, the creation of endowed professorships 
and for general campus improvements. Counting gifts, beguests and 
other forms of income, the campaign total has reached five million 
dollars. 



Philosophy of the university 

The basic assumptions and goals which have governed and con- 
tinue to govern the academic programs and life of the university are: 
the belief that there is value and virtue in a general education to help 
students acguire an understanding of society and the place of the in- 
dividual within it; a conviction that the hallmark of an educated person 
is a critical mind in the sense of a capacity to test and challenge 
previous assumptions and new ideas; a strong commitment to the prin- 
ciple that in a complex and technological society a university cannot 
be insensitive to the need of its students for professional training which 
will enable them to obtain rewarding and productive employment; and 
that a higher education must provide students with a breadth of 
knowledge and a sensitivity to weigh ethical and moral issues and form 
values and life goals. 

Other assumptions and considerations governing the academic 
programs and activities of the university have been: recognition of the 
need for students to participate in work and service activities which 
provide contacts with other aspects of society and in using skills and 
exercising judgment and responsibility in a variety of settings outside 
the university community; the importance of allowing full play and 
scope to the creative abilities and intellectual curiosity of students 
through opportunities to pursue independent study and investigation; 
the importance of recognizing the educational interests of students 
geared toward specific professions and careers as students seek to ad- 
just to changing labor market conditions; and, lastly, preparing stu- 
dents for graduate and professional training beyond the baccalaureate. 



Accreditation 

The University of New Haven is fully accredited as a general pur- 
pose institution by the New England Association of Schools and 
Colleges. 

Representative memberships in which the university is an active 
participant include the Council of Graduate Schools, the Northeastern 
Association of Graduate Schools, the New England Association of 
Graduate Schools, the Assembly of the American Association of Col- 
legiate Schools of Business, the College Entrance Examining Board, 



General Information 



the American Society of Engineering Education, the Educational 
Testing Service Amencan Council on Education, American Associa- 
tion for Higher Education, Association of Urban Universities, Council 
for the Advancement of Small Colleges, and the National Commission 
on Accrediting. The Engineers' Council for Professional Development 
has accredited the undergraduate mechanical, industrial, civil, and 
electrical engineering programs. 



Affirmative action 

The University of New Haven is committed to aftirmative action 
and to a policy which provides for equal opportijnity in employment, 
advancement, admission, educational opportunity and administration 
of financial aid to all persons on the basis of individual ment. This 
policy is administered without regard to race, color, national origin, 
age, sex, religion or disabilities not related to performance. 



TITLE IX 

It IS the policy of \he University of New Haven not to discriminate 
on the basis of sex in its admission, educational programs, activities or 
employment policies as required by Title IX of the 1972 Education 
Amendments. 

Inquiries regarding aftirmative action, equal opportunity and Titie 
IX may be directed to the director of equal opportunity. 



Schools of the university 



Undergraduate stijdents at the University of New Haven may 
elect majors in one of four schools, the School of Arts and Sciences, the 
School of Business Administration which includes the Division of 
Criminal lustice, the School of Engineering and \he School of Profes- 
sional Studies and Continuing Education which includes the Division of 
Evening Stiadies. Graduate programs are offered tiirough the 
Graduate School. All schools within the university are coeducational. 



Schools of the University 



School of Arts and Sciences 

The School of Arts and Sciences offers programs leading to the 
associate in science degree, the bachelor of arts degree and the bach- 
elor of science degree. Through the Graduate School, the School of 
Arts and Sciences offers programs leading to the master of arts degree, 
the master of science degree, and the senior professional certificate. 

Associate in science degree programs are offered in 9 fields: 
biology, chemistry, environmental studies, fashion design, fire and oc- 
cupational safety, general studies, graphic and advertising design, in- 
terior design and journalism. 

Bachelor of arts degree programs are offered in 18 fields: art, 
biology, chemistry, communication, economics, English, fashion de- 
sign, graphic and advertising design, history, interior design, mathe- 
matics, philosophy, physics, political science, psychology, social 
welfare, sociology and world music. 

Bachelor of science degree programs are offered in three fields: 
biology, chemistry, and environmental studies. 

Detailed information on these undergraduate programs is avail- 
able in the Undergraduate Bulletin. 

Master of arts degree programs are offered in four fields: com- 
munity psychology, gerontology, humanities and organizational /in- 
dustrial psychology. 

The master of science degree is offered in environmental sciences. 

The senior professional certificate is offered in applications of 
psychology. 

Detailed information on these graduate programs is available in 
this Graduate Bulletin. 



School of Business Administration 

The School of Business Administration offers programs leading to 
the associate in science degree and the bachelor of science degree. 
Through the Graduate School, the School of Business Administration 
offers programs leading to the master of science degree, the master of 
business administration degree, the master of public administration 
degree, the executive master of business administration degree and the 
senior professional certiticate. 

Associate in science degree programs are offered in four tields: 
business administration; communication; hotel management, tourism 
and travel; and retailing. 

Bachelor of science degree programs are offered in 20 fields: 
business administration; business data processing; business economics; 
business science — biology; business science — chemistry; business 
science — physical science; business science — physics; communica- 
tion; finance; financial accounting; hotel management, tourism and 



General Information 



travel; institutional food service administration; international business; 
management science; managerial accounting; marketing; operations 
management; personnel management; public admmistration and re- 
tailing. 

Detailed information on these undergraduate programs is 
available m the Undergraduate Bulletin. 

Master of science degree programs are offered in three fields: ac- 
counting, industrial relations and taxation. 

The master of business administration degree, the executive 
master of business administration degree and the master of public ad- 
ministration degree are also offered. 

The senior professional certificate is offered in accounting and tax- 
ation, economic forecasting, finance, general management, interna- 
tional business, marketing, public management and guantitative 
analysis. 

Detailed information on these graduate programs is available m 
this Graduate Bulletin. 

DIVISION OF CRIMINAL JUSTICE 

The Division of Criminal Justice within the School of Business Ad- 
ministration offers programs leading to the associate in science degree 
and the bachelor of science degree. Through the Graduate School, the 
Division of Criminal Justice offers programs leading to the master of 
science degree. 

Associate in science degree programs are offered in two fields: 
criminal justice — administration and criminal justice — corrections. 

Bachelor of science degree programs are offered in five fields: 
criminal justice — administration, criminal justice — corrections, 
criminal justice — forensic science, law enforcement science and 
security management. 

Detailed information on these undergraduate programs is 
available in the Undergraduate Bulletin. 

Master of science degree programs are offered in two fields: 
criminal justice and forensic science. 

Detailed information on these graduate programs is available in 
this Graduate Bulletin. 



School of Engineering 

The School of Engineering offers programs leading to the master 
of science degree, the bachelor of science degree, the associate in 
science degree and the senior professional certificate. 

Bachelor of science degree programs are offered in six fields: 
computer technology, electrical engineering, mechanical engineering, 
industrial engineering, materials engineering and civil engineering. 



Schools of the University 



The associate in science degree is offered in engineering. 

Detailed information on these undergraduate programs is avail- 
able in the Undergraduate Bulletin. 

The master of science degree is offered in six fields: computer and 
information science, electrical engineering, environmental engineer- 
ing, industrial engineering, operations research, and mechanical 
engineering. 

The dual degree, master of business administration/master of 
science in industrial engineering, is also offered. 

The senior professional certificate is offered in computer and infor- 
mation systems. 

Detailed information on these graduate programs is available in 
this Graduate Bulletin. 



School of Professional Studies 
and Continuing Education 

The School of Professional Studies and Continuing Education of- 
fers programs leading to the associate in science degree and bachelor 
of science degree as well as part-time credit and noncredit courses 
both on and off campus. The school has eight distinct units: the Divi- 
sion of Evening Studies, which offers a wide variety of under- 
graduate credit programs; professional studies, which offers full-time 
degree programs in aeronautical technology, occupational safety and 
health, fire science and packaging and package handling; the summer 
school, which offers undergraduate courses in two, five- week terms to 
students wishing to accelerate their academic careers or to make up 
courses uncompleted during the previous year; the off-campus pro- 
gram offered at various locations throughout the state; intersession, 
which offers credit courses during the period between the fall and 
spring semesters; the Division of Special Studies, which offers a 
variety of noncredit, certificate courses in both specialized and general 
areas of study; the Management Center, which provides specialized 
training to managers and administrators in business and industry; and 
the Division of Continuing Education, which offers noncredit, inten- 
sive seminars, workshops and institutes. 

Complete information about the individual units may be found in 
the Undergraduate Bulletin. 



General Information 



Graduate School 



General information 

The Graduate School academic year is conducted on a term sys- 
tem. Most classes meet once each week in the late afternoon and early 
evening for thirteen consecutive weeks. A small proportion of the 
classes are scheduled on Saturdays. Other classes meet on a swing 
shift schedule, where professors meet the same class at both morning 
and evening hours on the same day to accommodate police officers, 
fire fighters or other students who work a rotating shift. 

The Fall term begins in September and ends in December; the 
Winter term begins in January and ends the first week of April; the 
Spring term begins the second week in April and ends in July. 

The Graduate School Summer session runs for six and one-half 
weeks from mid -July to late August. Classes generally meet twice a 
week. Independent study is possible in some cases, subject to the ap- 
proval of the program coordinator. Intensive seminars and courses of a 
shorter duration are occasionally offered during the summer months. 
Refer to the summer session brochure for details. 



Full-time study 

Though most graduate students at the university study on a part- 
time basis, it is possible to do full-time work in the Graduate School. At 
the University of New Haven, the following 12 graduate programs per- 
mit full-time study; any program not listed here would be difficult or im- 
possible to study as a full-time student: business administration, public 
administration, accounting, criminal justice, industrial engineering, 
computer and information science, forensic science, operations re- 
search, community psychology, organizational/industrial psychology, 
the dual degree, master of business administration/master of science in 
industrial engineering and mechanical engineering. 



Admission 



General requirements 

Applicants to the University of New Haven Graduate School are 
reguired to have an undergraduate degree from an accredited institu- 



Admission 



tion. Certain programs have additional requirements for admission to 
specific curricula, details of which are included in the program listings 
later in the bulletin. 

Admission decisions are based primarily on an applicant's 
undergraduate record. Prospective students who are currently com- 
pletmg their undergraduate study should submit an official transcript 
complete to the date of application. In most cases, an admission deci- 
sion will be made on the basis of the partial transcript, contingent upon 
completion of the baccalaureate degree. Registration will not be per- 
mitted until a final, official transcript is submitted to the Graduate 
School admission oftice. 

In support of an application, students may submit their scores 
from the Graduate Record Examination, both the Aptitijde Test and the 
Advanced Test, the Graduate Management Admission Test or the 
Miller Analogies Test. Stiadents may be required to take one or more of 
these tests. 



Procedure 

An applicant for admission to the Graduate School must submit a 
formal application, two letters of recommendation, complete ofticial 
transcripts of all previous college work and the nonrefundable applica- 
tion fee. 

Students may be admitted for any term. Should a student be 
unable to enter the Graduate School during the term for which admis- 
sion is granted, the acceptance will remain open for one calendar year. 
After one year, a new application for admission will be required. 



Admission categories 

Applicants and students m the Graduate School are assigned to 
one of three categories: fully matriculated, provisional or special. 

FULLY MATRICULATED 

Students accepted for entrance into a regular degree program 
are fully matriculated students. 

PROVISIONAL 

Applicants whose undergraduate average falls below the standard 
set for full matriculation may be accepted provisionally. Stijdents ac- 
cepted provisionally should seek out the advice of their coordinator or 
adviser so that their graduate work can be closely supervised. 



General Information 



Students who complete the work stipulated in their provisional ac- 
ceptance with an average of B or better will automatically become fully- 
matriculated graduate students. 

SPECIAL 

Special student status is reserved for students who do not wish to 
matriculate in a program. Registration is limited to 12 credit hours of 
graduate work. Should the student desire to continue graduate work, 
he or she must be accepted into a specific graduate program. Special 
students are responsible for seeing to it that prereguisite reguirements 
for the courses they wish to take are met. 



In-process registration 

Prospective students who complete their applications after the 
stated deadline may register once as "in-process" students. In-process 
students may register for no more than six credits' work without the ap- 
proval of the coordinator of the program for which they are applying. 

It is the responsibility of in -process students to see to it that all 
materials in support of their application are received by the university 
in time for a matriculation decision before the next term. In-process 
students will not be permitted to register a second time until a 
matriculation decision has been made. Acceptance as an in-process 
student does not guarantee admission to the Graduate School. 



Auditors 

An auditor is allowed to attend class and is expected to participate 
in class discussions and complete the reguired assignments. An auditor 
receives no grade or credit toward any degree. Auditor status does not 
imply admission to any of the graduate degree programs. There is a 
special Application for Study as an Auditor form available in the 
Graduate Office. Both registered students and nonstudents are eligible 
to audit University of New Haven Graduate School courses. 



Admission of international students 

Qualified international students are welcome as students in the 
Graduate School of the University of New Haven. 

U.S. immigration regulations reguire that students holding a stu- 
dent visa maintain adeguate progress. Adeguate progress means full- 
time study, which is generally interpreted to mean taking at least three 



10 



Admission 



courses each term. Prospective international students should, there- 
fore, note that not all graduate programs are designed to permit full- 
time study. A complete listing of such programs is provided elsewhere 
in this bulletin. 

The major criterion for the admission of international students is 
the same as that used for citizens of the United States: Does the under- 
graduate preparation of the student gualify him or her for graduate 
study m a degree program at the University of New Haven? Since in- 
stitutions and systems of higher education vary from country to coun- 
try, the international applicant may expect that he or she will be asked 
to provide substantiation, not only of the courses taken and grades 
received, but also of the academic reputation of the undergraduate 
school within the educational system of the particular country. All tran- 
scripts must be provided in English. 

In addition, the Graduate School requires that the applicant sub- 
mit evidence of English proficiency. The TOEFL examination is recom- 
mended, but if undergraduate work has been completed in English or 
if arrangements for the TOEFL are difficult, the ORE or GMAT ex- 
aminations may be substituted for the TOEFL. The Graduate School 
may also require that evidence of English proficiency be ascertained 
by an overseas interview, any charge for which must be borne by the 
prospective student. 

Every international applicant will be evaluated carefully regard- 
ing undergraduate subject matter mastery and English proficiency. A 
student whose examination score falls below acceptable standards for 
English proficiency (which in the case of the TOEFL examination is 
600) or whose undergraduate work does not provide necessary 
preparation for the particular program of study chosen in the 
Graduate School, may be admitted subject to the requirement that the 
course of study at the University of New Haven include intensive work 
in English and undergraduate courses, for which no graduate credit 
will be given. 

International students will need to provide a signed financial 
resource statement prior to the issuance of an 1-20, since the university 
must certify that it has checked the international student's finances. The 
University of New Haven does not offer financial assistance to interna- 
tional students. 

One year's tuition, meaning the tuition for three, three-credit 
courses for each of three terms, is required in advance before a form 
1-20 will be issued. This tuition will be refunded according to usual re- 
fund policies if the 1-20 is returned to the Graduate School Admission 
Office. 

International students are required to have medical insurance, 
and may elect to purchase the University's student policy if they wish. 
Since the review of applications from international students takes 
much longer than those from citizens of the United States, it is impor- 
tant that applications and all supporting materials be received by the 
Graduate School well before the stated deadline in the academic 
calendar. 



11 



General Information 



- Upon acceptance students are invited to contact the director of 
housing for assistance in locating living accommodations. 

Graduate students studying under an F-1 visa are allowed 24 
months to complete a degree program. All F-1 visa students must 
register for a minimum of 9 credit hours per term. Once visa students 
have completed their degree program the International Student Office 
will not issue an 1-538 for extension of temporary stay, except for 
periods of practical training approved by the Graduate School and the 
U.S. Office of Immigration. 



Registration 

Registration deadlines are listed in the graduate calendar and in 
the class schedules that are published each term. 

Any student who fails to register for two consecutive terms will no 
longer receive registration materials. It will be the responsibility of the 
student to notify Graduate Records of the desire to continue graduate 
study. 

No registrations will be accepted after the stated deadlines, and 
no add slips will be accepted after the first week of class. A student may 
withdraw from a course any time prior to the last scheduled class 
meeting. Course additions or withdrawals may be handled in person 
or by mail. 

The university reserves the right to change class schedules or in- 
structors at any time. It further reserves the right to cancel any course, 
and, in such cases, will refund full tuition to the students. 

Students with an outstanding balance will not be permitted to 
register. Current students who register after the registration deadline 
will be assessed a late registration fee. 



Academic Policies 



Academic counseling 

Students may request academic counseling at any time. Appoint- 
ments should be scheduled through department chairmen or program 
coordinators. 

It is the student's responsibility to select courses in accordance 
with prerequisites, the adviser's recommendations, the departmental 
plan of study (if required) and the requirements for the degree. 

A student is not required to file a formal plan of study with the 
Graduate School. It is the student's responsibility to meet the stated re- 
quirements for the degree. 



12 



Academic Policies 



Awarding of degrees 

The University of New Haven awards degrees twice a year, at 
commencements in January and in June. 

Students completing the requirements for a degree at the end of 
the fall term will receive the degree in January. Students corfipleting 
the requirements for a degree at the end of the winter term will receive 
the degree at the June commencement. Students completing the re- 
quirements for a degree at the end of the spring term will receive the 
degree the following January. Students completing the requirements 
for a degree in July will receive a formal statement that they have com- 
pleted all requirements for the degree and will formally be awarded 
their diploma in January. 

Candidates for January Commencement must file a petition with 
Graduate Records no later than October 14, and for June Commence- 
ment no later than March 1 . Forms for this purpose are available in the 
Graduate School Office and in the Office of the Registrar. Payment of 
the graduation fee must accompany the petition. 

Should a candidate not fulfill all the requirement for graduation 
before the deadline after having filed the petition to graduate and paid 
the fee, the student will have to petition again at a later date. At that 
time, only the refiling fee will be charged. 

All financial obligations to the university must be met prior to 
graduation. 



Grading system 

The Graduate School uses the following grading system: 
A — Superior performance 
B — Good performance 
C — Passing performance 
F — Failure 

P —Pass -carries credit hours toward the degree 
S — Satisfactory performance in a noncredit course 
W— Withdrawal from a course 
I —Incomplete -given on rare occasions. A grade of I that is not 

changed within one calendar year automatically reverts to a W. 
T —Used for thesis /seminar project students who have not completed 

work during the term in which they originally registered for the 

course. Students must complete their work within the maximum 

allowable time for graduate work. 



Grade reports 

Reports of the final grade in each subject will be mailed to the stu- 
dent soon after the close of each term. 



13 



General Information 



Academic standards 

The academic standing of each student is determined on the basis 
of the quality point ratio earned each term. 

To determine a quality point, each letter grade earned durmg a 
term is assigned a quality point value: 

A —Four quality points 
B —Three quality points 
C —Two quality points 
F — Zero quality points 
P —Zero quality points 
S —Zero quality points 
U —Zero quality points 
W— Zero quality points 
I —Zero quality points 
T — Zero quality points 

The quality point ratio is obtained by multiplying the quality point 
value of each grade by the number of semester hours assigned to each 
course in the bulletin, then dividing the total quality points carried by 
the total semester hours attempted. 

A cumulative quality point ratio is obtained by calculating the 
quality point ratio for all courses attempted at the University of New- 
Haven. 



Repetition of work 

A student may repeat a course, with the new grade superseding 
the old grade in the computation of the quality point ratio. The original 
grade remains on the transcript. 



Probation and appeals 

Any graduate student whose cumulative quality point ratio (OPR) 
is below 3.0, a B average, will be considered to be on academic pro- 
bation, and may be required to obtain permission from the program 
coordinator before registering for additional course work. A student 
whose cumulative QPR is below 2.7 after completion of 24 credits will 
be required to withdraw from the Graduate School. 

Appeals concerning directed withdrawal from the Graduate 
School under these circumstances should be directed to the dean of 
the Graduate School, who will in turn refer the appeal to the depart- 
ment chairman and/or the responsible administrative unit. 



14 



Academic Policies 



Transfer credit 

Transfer credit may be given for graduate courses taken at other 
accredited institutions subject to the following conditions: 

a. the courses were at the graduate level; 

b. each grade was B or better; and 

c. the courses did not fulfill reguirements for any other degree al- 
ready earned by the student. 



Waiver of courses 

Certain reguired courses in each program may be waived on the 
basis of undergraduate courses taken at accredited institutions. For a 
course to be waived, a student must first secure the written approval of 
the department chairman or a faculty member acting for the depart- 
ment chairman in the department in which the waiver is reguested. 
Only fully matriculated students may seek waivers. 



Thesis 

A number of preliminary steps are reguired before registration for 
thesis will be accepted by the graduate registrar. The student com- 
pletes the form, Proposal for Research Projects, Theses, Seminar Pro- 
jects, or Independent Studies, in which the proposed subject, the 
methodology and the hypothesis are described. The student secures 
the approval signature of a faculty member who will serve as adviser. 
The student must also secure the approval of the proposed thesis and 
the thesis adviser by the program coordinator. Only after the graduate 
registrar has received the signed proposal form will the student be per- 
mitted to register for thesis. 

A thesis will carry no fewer than six academic credits taken over 
no fewer than two academic terms. A preliminary draft must be 
presented to the adviser at least 45 days prior to commencement. 
Upon approval by the adviser and program coordinator, two final, un- 
bound copies are presented to the Graduate School at least three 
weeks before commencement. After the dean of the Graduate School 
approves the thesis, credit is awarded and the thesis is deposited in the 
university library for binding and becomes part of the permanent col- 
lection. Additional copies may be reguired by the adviser or the pro- 
gram coordinator. 

For guidance in the preparation of theses, graduate students 
should consult A Manual for the Preparation of Graduate Thesis and 
Technical Projects, copies of which are available in the Graduate 
School Office. Questions not resolved by the instructions should be set- 
tled in consultation with the adviser and by reference to a standard 



15 



General Information 



style manual. The Graduate School participates in the University 
Microfilm Masters Program, and outstanding theses will be awarded 
this recognition upon the recommendation of the adviser, the program 
coordinator*, or both. 



Research projects, seminar projects, and 
independent study 

Some departments and academic programs require the comple- 
tion of research projects, seminar projects, or independent study, 
rather than theses. In these cases, as with a thesis, students must have 
the written approval of their advisers and department chairmen prior 
to enrolling. This is accomplished by completing the form. Proposed 
for Research Projects, Theses, Seminar Projects, or Independent 
Studies, and securing required approvals. 

Students preparing a research project, seminar project, or in- 
dependent study should follow the guidelines presented in the Manual 
for the Preparation of Graduate Thesis and Seminar Projects, copies of 
which are available in the office of the Graduate School. 



Time limit for completion of degree requirements 

Students must complete all the requirements for their degree 
within five years of the date of their initial matriculation in the program. 
Any extension of the time limit can be granted only by the dean of the 
Graduate School after consultation with the appropriate program 
coordinator. 



Residency requirements 

Degree programs have a 30-graduate-credit residency require- 
ment, with the exception of the M.B.A./M.S.I.E. dual degree program 
which has a 60-graduate-credit residency requirement. Credit toward 
the residency requirements may be earned at the mam campus or at 
the off -campus centers. 



Graduate school ethics 

It is Graduate School policy that all students are expected to com- 
plete all course requirements on their own initiative and endeavor, with 
no collaboration unless specifically authorized by an instructor. In ad- 



16 



Tuition and Fees 



dition, material used by students but authored by another individual, 
publisher, company, government or organization shall be identified as 
such by appropriate footnotes or references. Violations of this policy, 
either in fact or in spirit, will normally be handled by the faculty 
member involved though they may be grounds for dismissal from the 
Graduate School. Students wishing to appeal the decision of a faculty 
member should contact the Graduate School. 



Tuition and fees 



The following are the tuition, fees and charges which were in ef- 
fect during the 1978-1979 school year. The university reserves the 
right, at any time, to make whatever changes may be deemed 
necessary in admission requirements, fees, charges, tuition, regulations 
and academic programs prior to the start of any class, term semester, 
term or session. 



TUITION 

Tuition, per credit hour $82 

Executive MBA program, total cost effective 

August 1-979 6,000 

Noncredit course fee, per course 1 55 

Auditor, per course 155 



NONREFUNDABLE FEES 

Application fee $ 1 5 

Auditor application fee 5 

Graduate Student Council fee, per term : 1 

Graduation fee 35 

Graduation refiling fee 15 

Laboratory fee 20 

Computer use fee 20 

Late payment fee 10 

Late registration fee, current students . . .■ 15 

Registration fee, per term 5 

Senior professional certificate fee 10 

Transcript fee, first copy . free 

Additional copies 1 

Fee for dropping a course 5 



17 



General Information 



Payment 

Tuition for graduate courses is due at registration. However, the 
university permits graduate students to pay tuition on an installment 
basis, paying one half with the registration form and the balance before 
the first day of the term. All students who have not completed tuition 
payments by the first day of the term will be assessed the late pay- 
ment fee. 

Students are responsible for payment of tuition to the university, 
even though they may be eligible for their employer's tuition reim- 
bursement plan. Students are responsible for making their own ar- 
rangements with their employers for reimbursement. 

The university withholds the giving of grades, the award of 
diplomas, the issuance of transcripts ancd the granting of honorable 
dismissal to any student whose account is in arrears. 

The university accepts Master Charge and BankAmericard/VISA 
for payment of tuition. 



Withdrawal 

To be eligible for a refund of tuition, students must formally notify the 
registrar of their intention to withdraw by completing the university 
withdrawal form and submitting it to the registrar by mail or in person. 
The date of the postmark on mailed withdrawal form, or the date of 
submission on those brought in person, determines the amount of the 
refund, if any, due the student. 



Refunds 

The refund policy for graduate students who withdraw from any 
course or from any program is as follows: 80% refund of tuition upon 
formal withdrawal prior to the second regularly scheduled class 
meeting, 60% refund of tuition upon formal withdrawal pnor to the 
third regularly scheduled class meeting, 40% refund of tuition upon 
formal withdrawal prior to the fourth regularly scheduled class 
meeting, 20% refund of tuition upon formal withdrawal prior to the 
fifth regularly scheduled class meeting. No refund will be made after 
the fifth regularly scheduled class meeting. 



Living costs 

Estimated costs for attending the University of New Haven 
Graduate School for the 1978-79 academic year are as follows. 



18 







Financial Support 


SINGLE STUDENT 


6 Credits 


9 Credits 


12 Credits 


Tuition and Fees 
Books ancd Materials 
Base Living Costs 


$ 498. 

54. 

1,560. 


$ 744. 

80. 

1,560. 


$ 990. 

108. 

1,560. 


Cost Per Term 


$2,112. 


$2,384. 


$2,658. 


Cost Per Year (10 months) 


$6,336. 


$7,152. 


$7,974. 


MARRIED— NO CHILDREN 








Tuition and Fees 
Books and Materials 
Base Living Costs 


$ 498. 

54. 

2,098. 


$ 744. 

80. 

2,098. 


$ 990. 

108. 

2,098. 


Cost per Term 


$2,650. 


$2,922. 


$3,196. 


Cost Per Year 


$7,950. 


$8,766. 


$9,588. 



Budgets are adjusted for additional family members. 

Additional living costs for summer: 

Single $ 940. 

Married 1,260. 

NOTE: Living costs are based on Estimated BLS Moderate Consumption 
Budget Standards (20-35 age group) adjusted to Autumn 1978. 

Source: GAPSFAS News and Notes, Vol. II, No. 4, January 1979. 



Financial support for graduate 
study 

Financial support is available to graduate students in the form of 
fellowships, assistantships, grants-in-aid, loans and work-study. 

The deadline for application for fellowships and teaching assistant- 
ships is April 15 of the preceding academic year. Fellowships offer 
partial tuition support to full- and part-time students, and are awarded 
on the basis of outstanding academic achievement. 

Teaching assistantships are competitive appointments available in 
some programs and departments and carry a stipend and partial tui- 
tion support. The teaching assistant must work approximately 20 hours 
a week. 

Grant-in-aid awards are based upon financial need, and require 



19 



General Information 



the GAPSFAS application. The deadlines for the receipt of this applica- 
tion are July 1 , December 1 , and March 1 . Applications received after 
those deadlines can be acted upon only if funds permit. 

The state of Connecticut and other states have established loan 
programs offering long-term loans at low interest rates. In Connecticut, 
a student may borrow up to a maximum of $5,000 each school year. 
Repayment starts one year after graduation. Federal interest benefits 
cover the full interest while in attendance and during the year following 
graduation. 

Part-time employment is also available to graduate students under 
the college work -study program. The program enables students with 
financial need to work on- or off -campus for a maximum of 20 hours a 
week. 



Application and eligibility 

A GAPSFAS (Graduate and Professional School Financial Aid 
Service) application is required for all forms of support based upon 
need. GAPSFAS applications are available in the financial aid office 
and the Graduate School office. 

GAPSFAS applications are mailed by the student directly to 
GAPSFAS for processing, after which GAPSFAS will forward the ap- 
plication to the university. Generally, GAPSFAS requires four weeks 
to process applications before forwarding to the school. Since the 
university must receive the processed application by the deadline date, 
approximately four weeks before the start of the term for which the stu- 
dent is seeking aid, students are encouraged to file financial applica- 
tions early. A list of exact university deadlines is available from the 
financial aid office. 

International students are not eligible for financial assistance 
based upon need, since they must certify availability of sufficient funds 
at time of entry. Students on academic probation are not eligible for 
financial aid. 

Cooperative education 

Working with tfie definition and philosophy of cooperative educa- 
tion developed by the National Commission for Cooperative Educa- 
tion, a planning committee designed the program offered by the 
Graduate School at the University of New Haven. 

A key characteristic of the University of New Haven program, 
which is limited to graduate students, is a very high level of faculty in- 
volvement in the design and monitoring of work experiences to assure 
quality control. This careful interest develops an intricate relationship 
between the work functions and the academic disciplines. 

Work assignments are scheduled to correspond exactly with the 
Graduate School calendar. Registration and grading procedures are 



20 



Financial Support 



identical to those for regular terms. 

The graduate cooperative education program is organized 
around a two-year cycle in which two, six -month work periods alter- 
nate with two, six-month periods of full-time graduate study. 

During work assignments, students receive the salary of a full-time 
employee from the cooperative education employer, the amount of 
which is negotiated between the student and the employer. 

SCHEDULED SEQUENCE 

First Year 

6 months (2 terms) full-time study 18 credits 

3 or 6 months full-time work registered as one 
independent study 3 credits 

Total credits in first year 21 credits 

Second Year 

6 months (2 terms) full-time study 18 credits 

3 or 6 months full-time work registered as one 
independent study 3 credits 

Total credits in second year . 21 credits 

Total credits, first and second years 42 credits 

The cooperative education program schedule will allow students 
to complete 42 credits of work during the two-year period. Some pro- 
grams, however, reguire more than 42 credits' work. In those pro- 
grams, additional study may be reguired. 



The Law Enforcement Assistance Program 

The Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Street Act of 1968 
established loan and grant programs awarded under the Law Enforce- 
ment Education Program (LEEP). These awards are subject to current 
guidelines of the Department of lustice and the availability of funds. 

Full information and applications for financial aid under LEEP can 
be obtained from the financial aid office. 

LOANS 

The Law Enforcement Student Loan Program makes available 
ten-year, interest -bearing (7%) notes of up to $2,200 per academic 
year to full-time students enrolled in undergraduate and graduate pro- 
grams leading to degrees in areas directly related to law enforcement. 



21 



General Information 



These loans can be cancelled at the rate of 25% for each year of 
employment in a public, state, local or federal law enforcement 
agency. 

GRANTS 

Grants are available to full-time employees of a publicly funded 
law enforcement agency under the Law Enforcement Student Grant 
Program. Payments of up to $250 per term are provided to full- or 
part-time graduate students working toward a degree in this field. A 
recipient must agree to remain with a law enforcement agency for two 
years after completion of studies funded by this grant. 



Title XX funds 

All graduate students should be aware that they may be able to 
receive a waiver of tuition through Title XX. To receive this waiver, 
students must be full- or part-time paid employees of agencies receiv- 
ing Title XX funding. At least 20% of students' professional respon- 
sibilities must involve face-to-face contact with clients of their agencies. 
In addition to completing all forms normally reguired for admission, 
students must complete Title XX forms. 

Students who believe they gualify should contact the Title XX Of- 
fice. 



22 



Map 






j-~j' t 



*- "-T 



L«srr^ 



STUDENT ACTIVITIES 
AND OTHER SERVICES 

About New Haven 



Since 1638 when English Puritans first settled in the fledgling col- 
ony which indians had called Ouinnipiack, New Haven has played 
host to the tastes and talents of succeeding waves of immigrants from 
all parts of the world. And today, looking ahead to its 350th birthday, 
New Haven stands as the gateway to New England. 

In population. New Haven ranks third in the state and 51st in the 
country, with 763,000 persons. More than 1,000 firms in the im- 
mediate area produce products including guns, hardware, rubber 
goods, paper products, machinery and tools. The city is served by 
three television stations, six radio stations and has both a morning and 
afternoon newspaper. 



History 

With roots in the early 1600's, New Haven is rich with material for 
the historian, whether serious scholar or weekend explorer. A cassette- 
guided tour of the area surrounding the New Haven Green, available 
from the New Haven Information Center, traces events from the 
Puritans to the present. Yale's public campus tour points out other 



25 



Student Activities and Other Services 



famous spots - some historical, some hysterical - on the 280-year-old 
campus of the nation's fourth-oldest university. 

A century ago, on January 28, 1878, New Haven District 
Telephone Company opened the world's first telephone switching of- 
fice for its 21 subscribers in New Haven. Grandchildren of some of 
those first 2 1 telephone owners are still doing business in New Haven 
today. 



Transportation 

New Haven sits on a natural, deep water port - the third busiest 
port in New England - located on the northern shore of Long Island 
Sound. By automobile on major state and interstate highways. New 
Haven is 75 miles east of New York, 45 miles south of Hartford, 104 
miles west of Providence and 135 miles southwest of Boston. 

New Haven's Union Station is a major rail stop on Amtrak's 
popular Boston -Washington corridor. Frequent Conrail and Amtrak 
trains reach Boston or Philadelphia in three hours and Washington in 
six. 

Tweed-New Haven Airport offers direct flights to many north- 
eastern cities. Hourly limousine service from downtown New Haven 
shuttles passengers directly to Hartford's International Airport, New 
York's LaGuardia or Kennedy International Airports, or Newark Air- 
port. 

New Haven is served by major bus lines, with express service to 
major cities throughout the northeast. Connecticut Transit buses pro- 
vide local service; several suburban bus lines run to and from many 
major Connecticut towns. 



Art 

The oldest university art gallery in the western hemisphere, the 
Yale University Art Gallery represents virtually all national schools and 
important periods in art history. The Mellon Gallery of British Art, also 
in New Haven, holds the most comprehensive collection of British art 
found anywhere under one roof. 

Numerous smaller galleries throughout the region display smaller, 
more specialized collections of interest to a wide range of artistic tastes. 
The extensive museum collections in New York City are just a short 
distance away. 



26 



About New Haven 



Concerts 

Musical offerings available in the New Haven area appeal to a full 
range of tastes. The 85-year-old New Haven Symphony, the fourth 
oldest continuously performing orchestra in the country, performs 
regularly. The Woolsey Hall Concert Series brings visiting orchestras 
and well-known instrumentalists to the city. Several groups present 
chamber music and string quartet concerts. The Connecticut Ballet 
performs in New Haven. Many performances, including Yale Sym- 
phony, Yale Philharmonia and other Yale concerts, are free and open 
to the public. 

There is much to attract more contemporary tastes as well. Con- 
certs at the Coliseum bring top entertainers to New Haven, including 
Yes, The Grateful Dead, Billy Joel, Bruce Springsteen, John Denver 
and Frank Sinatra. 

A typical Friday night may see disco at the Enca Cafe, the 
Galvanized Jazz Band or the Ten Years Late Jug Band at Millpond 
Tavern, quiet piano and vocals at Sherman's Taverne on the Green, 
local bands at the Arcadia Ballroom or Toad's Place, or a lot of quiet 
talk at FitzWilly's. Fridays on campus are jumping, too. 

Skiing 

Connecticut has six ski areas of its own, most with excellent 
snowmaking and night-skiing capabilities. For beginners, the univer- 
sity's physical education department runs a ski class one night a week 
each winter at a nearby ski area. 

Great skiing in the Berkshires is two or three hours away in 
western Massachusetts. You'll find international class skiing in the 
Green Mountains of Vermont, three to six hours away depending 
upon how tall you like your mountains. 

Sports 

The University of New Haven fields teams in 14 varsity sports; all 
games are open to spectators. The Triple-A league West Haven 
Yankees, farm club team for the New York Yankees, play professional 
baseball at Quigley Stadium in West Haven, walking distance from 
campus. The North American Soccer League Connecticut Bicenten- 
nials and the American Hockey League New Haven Nighthawks are 
both based in the city. 

Bridgeport, Hartford and Milford Jai Alai frontons are nearby, as 
is the Plainheld Greyhound Park. 

"Doers" can visit one of seven golf courses, 30 tennis courts, six 
skating rinks, 50 playgrounds, 15 parks, or simply walk on the shore. 
The university's extensive intramural program, described elsewhere in 
this bulletin, is open to all students. 



27 



Student Activities and Other Services 



Theatre 



New Haven, long famous as a Broadv^ay try out town, today offers 
a rich range of theatrical styles. The reknowned Long Wharf Theatre 
offers top, professional theatre with stars such as Eli Wallach, Ann 
Jackson and Frank Converse. Yale Repertory Theatre presents less 
well known plays in a range of styles - from Renaissance to Avant 
Garde. The American Shakespeare Theatre -in Stratford is a must-see, 
too, with open-air performances of the Bard's great works and other 
classical presentations. 

A number of dinner theatres regularly present popular plays and 
musicals. Local professional and advanced amateur repertory com- 
p)anies give those with an interest m drama their chance to be on stage 
as well as in front of it. 



Activities 



Clubs and organizations 

There are almost 40 university student clubs and societies open to 
interested students. Included are student chapters of professional 
societies, religious organizations, social groups and special interest 
clubs. 



Councils 

Separate day, evening and graduate student councils have the 
responsibility for initiating, organizing and carrying through extracur- 
ricular activities and for liaison between students and the university 
staff. 

The Graduate Student Council is a forum where graduate 
students can provide input to the administration in order to improve all 
aspects of graduate education at the university , The council schedules 
a number of extracurricular activities, and all graduate students are en- 
couraged to attend. 



Cultural activities 

There are student organizations formed around interests in 
literature, art, film and drama. These groups sponsor visiting artists and 

28 



Student Activities 



lecturers, publish materials and generally provide a well-rounded 
cultural program for University of New Haven students. 



Publications 

Student publications include The News, the university student 
newspaper; The Chariot, the annual yearbook; The Noiseless Spider, a 
literary publication; and the Student Handbook. Students may 
volunteer their services on any of the student publications. 



WNHU radio 

WNHU, the university's student-operated FM stereo broadcast 
facility, operates throughout the year on a frequency of 88.7 MHz at a 
power of 1 ,700 watts. This extracurricular activity, open to all univer- 
sity students, whether undergraduate or graduate, serves southern 
Connecticut with the best in music, news and community affairs pro- 
gramming. Its sportscasters are the voice of University of New Haven 
Charger sports teams. The WNHU broadcast day consists of locally 
produced shows. However, selected Intercollegiate Broadcasting 
System and National Public Radio features are also presented. 

In its first year, WNHU gained national attention when announcer 
Tony Salzo set a 270-hour world record for longest continuous broad- 
cast. In 1974, WNHU again achieved national prominence by winning 
Broadcast Management/Engineering magazine's "Best Station Award." 

All WNHU activities in programming, business and engineering 
operations are performed by students in the university's day, evening 
and graduate divisions. The station will ti"ain all qualified students in 
their respective areas of interest. 



Social activities 

The social calendar is tilled with varied events to appeal to all 
stijdents: mixers, concerts, tilms, free parties to climax each semester, 
cabarets and Homecoming. 



Student center 

The Shjdent Center provides a focal point for all stiident activities. 
Offering lounges, student oftices, a game room, a large cafeteria and a 
snack bar, tiie facility has been designed to serve as a center for the 
student's nonacademic college interests. 



29 



Shjdent Activities and Other Services 



The Rathskeller, also located in the Student Center, opens daily at 
4 p.m. serving draft beer and snacks. Live entertainment is often 
presented in the Rathskeller on the weekends. 



Services 



Alumni 

Membership in the Alumni Association is acquired immediately 
upon graduation. All degree graduates become members automatic- 
ally. Including the class of 1978, there are almost 1 1,000 members of 
the Alumni Association. The alumni director, with the assistance of the 
Alumni Association president, conducts the affairs of the association 
during the period between meetings which occur four times per year. 

As a member of the Alumni Association, graduates receive an 
alumni card which enables them to use the university library, gym- 
nasium facilities and the services of the Career Development Office. 
Insight, an all-college publication, is mailed to all alumni nine times per 
year. Homecoming, an annual event in October, and other educa- 
tional and social events are open to all alumni. Alumni volunteers play 
an important role in the Annual Giving Campaign. 

The Alumni Association is represented on the Board of Governors 
by a member who is elected to a term of two years. The president of 
the association serves on the Board of Governors as an ex-officio 
member. 

Members of the Alumni Advisory Council are elected to a two- 
year term, and number approximately 30 people. The council is an ad- 
visory board to the university on alumni relations, and its primary ob- 
jectives are to strengthen alumni relations and to promote communica- 
tion between the alumni and the university as a whole. 



Athletics 

Graduate students are encouraged to make use of the North Cam- 
pus athletic complex. Facilities include three basketball courts, 
handball-paddleball court, weight room with universal gym, a 
multipurpose exercise room, steam room, fully equipped training 
room, six tennis courts, two softball fields, baseball diamond and com- 
bination football-soccer-lacrosse field. 

While graduate students are not eligible to participate in the 
undergraduate intercollegiate athletic program, they are eligible to 
take an active part in the intramural sports program administered by 



30 



Student Services 



Physical Education Department Chairman Don Wynschenk. In- 
tramural competition in touch football, badminton, bowling, three- and 
five-player basketball, paddleball, softball, tennis, floor hockey and 
volleyball are also sponsored. 

A valid UNH ID card is required for entrance to the North Cam- 
pus gym or tennis courts, during nonclass or free -time hours. In 
general, the gymnasium is open for graduate student use at times when 
regularly scheduled games and classes are not in progress. Students 
should take care to secure their locker or leave properly identified 
valuables with the equipment manager while using any facility. 

Students who participate in intramurals or use any UNH athletic 
complex facility are not covered by the university athletic insurance 
policy and participate at their own risk. The university recommends 
that an appropriate insurance policy be carried by each student to 
cover medical costs in case of injury. 

During the school year, the gymnasium is open from 9 a.m. to 
9:30 p.m. Monday through Friday with the hours 5 p.m. through 9:30 
p.m. generally reserved for undergraduate and graduate student use. 
Thie gym is available from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday. The building 
is closed on Sundays. 

The tennis courts are open dawn to dusk during clement weather 
and are supervised during peak hours, limiting use to UNH students 
and personnel on a one-hour-time-limit basis. 

The paddleball court must be reserved a day in advance by call- 
ing 934-6320 prior to 8:30 a.m. and 934-6321, Ext. 255, between 
8:30 a.m. and 5 p.m. 

It is hoped that graduate students will avail themselves of a full 
range of activities and that they will seek out athletic department and 
physical education department staff members to express interests in 
areas where further graduate student participjation can be encouraged. 



Bookstore 

The university's bookstore provides all necessary texts, new and 
used, that are required for courses at the university. It also carries 
related supplies, greeting cards, imprinted clothing, gifts, candy and a 
selection of paperbacks, newspapers and periodicals. The bookstore 
buys back used texts on a daily basis throughout the year. It also 
orders class rings and handles film processing for the campus com- 
munity. 

Special arrangements are made for students taking courses at off- 
campus locations to purchase required books at or near off -campus 
centers. 



31 



Student Activities and Othor Services 



Career Development 

and Off-Campus Employment Office 

This office has two primary functions vhthin the university: career 
advising and providing information about off -campus employment. It 
is located at the ground level below the bookstore on the main campus. 

CAREER DEVELOPMENT 

To assist students in making career choices, individual counseling 
is available and is supplemented by other resources. Special work- 
shops on resume preparation, interviewing skills and job research 
techniques are scheduled in both the fall and spring semesters. For 
those students with questions as to what career direction is most 
reasonable to pursue, a monthly professional career testing service is 
available. 

In addition, the office maintains an extensive library of career in- 
formation, vocational resources, brochures and annual reports on 
specific employers. 

OFF-CAMPUS EMPLOYMENT 

While the office is not an employment service, listings of both full- 
and part-time positions are maintained to provide a common meeting 
ground for employers and prospective employees. Undergraduate 
and graduate students will find this useful both in locating part-time and 
full-time employment while in school, as well as employment following 
graduation. Alumni seeking positions are encouraged to use the ser- 
vices of the office. 

Employers wishing to list positions with the Off -Campus Employ- 
ment Office need only call or write, giving a description of the position 
available and other details. There is never any fee charged for this 
service. 

ON-CAMPUS RECRUriMENT 

During each academic year, employer representatives visit the 
campus to interview graduating University of New Haven students, 
both graduate and undergraduate. In addition, representatives of a 
number of graduate schools visit to interview seniors interested in pur- 
suing graduate education. 

Students at all stages of their education and alumni are urged to 
make use of the office's resources in formulating career plans. 

PUBLICATIONS 

The Career Development and Off-Campus Employment office 
regularly publishes the career development section of the university 



32 



Student Services 



newspaper, Insight, and circulates the monthly campus recruiting let- 
ter. These publications appear during the first week of every month 
during the academic year and are also included with the alumni news. 
Information such as career development events, workshops, seminars, 
recruitment visits, employment outlook for graduates, job listings, job 
search hints, etc., are included. 

The Recruitment Schedule will be mailed to any member of the 
university community who wishes it and provides the office with a sup- 
ply of stamped, self -addressed envelopes for the number of months 
desired. 



Chaplains 

Chaplains of the major faiths represented in our student body are 
available for religious counseling and for presiding at special occasions. 



Computer facilities 

The university Computer Center provides time-sharing and batch 
processing of jobs for both academic and administrative functions at 
the university. 

The center maintains two independent yet totally compatible pro- 
cessing units each with 64K of core memory. One system is dedicated 
solely to academic usage with single batch capability and a capacity 
for 16 remote terminals for interactive use, where users can type in in- 
formation and receive immediate response. There is also the capacity 
for Remote Job Entry (RJE) stations on or off campus. The peripherals 
attached to the central processing unit are two 20-megabyte on-line 
disk drives, one magnetic tape drive, one 1 000-card-per-minute 
reader, one 600-line-per-minute printer, one 1 00 -card -per -minute 
punch unit, one graph plotter and one graphics display unit, a stand- 
alone minicomputer which is switchable to a terminal port on the main 
computer. 

The system dedicated to administrative functions has dual batch 
capabilities and allows an additional 16 terminal port accesses as well 
as the capacity for RJE stations on or off campus. The peripherals at- 
tached to the central processing unit are seven disk drives, each with 
20 megabytes of on-line storage, two magnetic tape drives, two 1000- 
card- per -minute readers, two 600-line-per-minute printers, one 
400 -card -per -minute punch unit and one paper tape reader. 

A major portion of data entry is made via remote terminal entry 
from various campus centers including admission, the registrar's office, 
the scheduling office and others. Terminal access is divided into sta- 
tionary hard-wired and portable dial-up types. Terminals are both 
hard -copy and cathode-ray tube. 



33 



Student Activities and Other Services 



Both systems are under control of the operating system, DNA's 
TSO with spooling. Because of the hardware and software redundancy 
between the administrative and academic systems, users are assured of 
almost perfect back-up under most circumstances. Although batch 
processing is available to the academic community during all class 
hours from morning to evening, the system is up and running at all 
times for portable terminal usage. Typically, 12 terminal ports are 
available to each segment during the day and 24 during the evening to 
morning hours. 

Students have the opportunity to learn such languages as FOR- 
TRAN IV, COBOL, PL/1, RPG-II, APL, BASIC, IBM-1130 
Assembler, IBM-360/370 BAL and others. The Computer Center of- 
fers a variety of engineering packages including stress analysis, elec- 
trical engineering circuitry analysis, mechanical engineering design 
programs and others. Statistical programs, plotter and graphics design 
programs and simulation programs are a part of many course offer- 
ings. Training in the usage, programming and debugging of programs 
on interactive terminals is stressed. 

More than 85 percent of the center's computer time available is 
given to academic service, which provides active training to more than 
700 students each semester. 

The Computer Center is staffed by degree -holding computer 
professionals, with student assistants as operators for the academic 
system. These student operators have demonstrated an ability and in- 
terest in the computer field, and their service at the center gualifies as 
on-the-job experience when applying for jobs upon graduation. 

The electrical engineering laboratory facilities include a Digital 
Corporation PDP-11/lOD Minicomputer system. This system incor- 
porates both disk and cassette drives and has teletype input -output as 
well as a graphics display terminal. Although primarily intended for 
use in electrical engineering courses, arrangements may be made for 
other students to work with this system. 



Counseling 

Individual counseling is offered to students for personal problems, 
for marital and domestic problems and for study and career choice 
problems. Students can obtain assistance for educational, vocational 
and general life problems. 

A student who does not know where to go for help should contact 
the Counseling Center for information and direction. 

TESTING 

The Counseling Center of the University of New Haven offers 
psychological testing including vocational interest, personality assess- 
ment and academic placement. Students who are unsure of their 



34 



Student Services 



academic skills, eventual career choices or life goals may request help 
in these areas. 



Housing 

The Housing office, located in the Student Center, will assist 
graduate students in finding off -campus housing accommodations. At 
the present time, college-owned housing for graduate students is not 
available. The office is open from 9:00-5:00, Monday through Friday, 
for any student wishing to find housing accommodations. The office 
has listings for apartments, houses and private rooms. 



International students 

The university is fortunate in having many countries represented 
in its student body. The International Student Office provides special 
guidance when needed. The International Center of New Haven, 
located near the Yale campus, welcomes all international students to 
the many programs they sponsor and to full use of their facilities. 



Library 

The Marvin K. Peterson Library, named in honor of the former 
president of the university, was opened in 1974. It has a capacity of 
300,000 bound volumes. Adjoining the Main Building, it includes 
special collection rooms, a music room, archives and spacious reading 
and reference areas. Study is made convenient by modern research 
facilities and equipment including microreading stations and micro- 
form reader -printers. 

The library contains more than 200,000 volumes, 70,000 U.S. 
government documents, 8,000 record albums, numerous corporate 
annual reports, pamphlet files and microfilm. The library subscribes to 
1 1,000 periodicals and extensive back issue files are maintained. 

The resources of both the New Haven and West Haven public 
libraries are available to students (nonresidents must pay a fee). Under 
a reciprocal arrangement. University of New Haven students may bor- 
row materials from the libraries of Albertus Magnus College or Quin- 
nipiac College by presenting a valid identity card. 



35 



Student Activities and Other Services 



Minority student affairs 

The director of Minority Affairs represents the needs and interests 
of minority students at the University of New Haven. The director 
works closely with minority students to ease the transition into the 
academic environment while enabling the student to maintain cultural 
pride and heritage. The director also promotes social and cultural ac- 
tivities which are of special interest to minority students. 

The director of Minority Affairs works closely with the dean of 
students and the president in making decisions which affect minority 
students on campus. 



Services for the handicapped 

The Office of Handicapped Services provides guidance and assis- 
tance to students with physical handicaps. The office also coordinates 
the university's compliance with section 504 of the H.E.W. Rehabilita- 
tion Act of 1973. All inquiries and problems concerning barrier-free 
access to university facilities should be addressed to this office. 



Veterans Affairs 

Since the university has one of the largest veteran enrollments in 
Connecticut, an Office of Veterans Affairs with a full-time staff is main- 
tained. The Veterans Administration has assigned to the university a 
V.A. representative who maintains liaison directly with state and na- 
tional V.A. offices. In addition to processing applications for various 
V.A. benefits, the campus Veterans Office provides a v^de range of 
supportive services for veterans attending the university. Assistance is 
available in academic areas, and special help such as funding for 
tutorial assistance, readers for the blind and aid for the disabled is also 
available. 



Cancellation of Classes 



In the event it becomes necessary to cancel graduate classes for 
inclement weather or other reason, radio announcements will be 
broadcast beginning at approximately 1 p.m. on the following stations: 



36 







Student Services 


WADS 


690 AM 


Ansonia 


WATR 


1320 AM 


Waterbury 


WAVZ 


1300 AM 


New Haven 


WDJF 


107.9 FM 


Westport 


WELI 


960 AM 


New Haven 


WERI 


1230 AM, 103.7 FM 


Westerly, R.I. 


WFIF 


1500 AM 


Milford 


WGCH 


1490 AM 


Greenwich 


WHCN 


105.9 FM 


Hartford 


WICC 


600 AM 


Bridgeport 


WINE 


940 AM 


Brookfield 


WKCI 


101.3 FM 


Hamden 


WLAD 


800 AM, 98.3 FM 


Danbury 


WLIS 


1420 AM 


Old Saybrook 


WMMM 


1260 AM 


Westport 


WNAB 


1450 AM 


Bridgeport 


WNHC 


1340 AM 


New Haven 


WNHU 


88.7 FM 


West Haven 


WNLC 


1510 AM 


New London 


WOMN 


1220 AM 


Hamden 


WPLR 


99.1 FM 


New Haven 


WPOP 


1410 AM 


Hartford 


WOOW 


1590 AM 


Waterbury 


WRKI 


95.1 FM 


Brookfield 


WSTC 


1400 AM 


Stamford 


WSUB 


980 AM 


Groton 


WTIC 


1080 AM 


Hartford 


WTYD 


100.9 FM 


New London 


WWCO 


1240 AM 


Waterbury 


WWYZ 


92.5 FM 


Waterbury 



An announcement of the cancellation of undergraduate day 
classes does not apply to graduate classes unless the announcement 
states the university has been closed. The cancellation of graduate 
classes will be announced independently. 



37 



ACADEMIC PROGRAMS 



Accounting 

Business Administration 

Hotel Management option 
Business Administration /Industrial Engineering dual 

degree 
Community Psychology 
Computer and Information Science 
Criminal justice 
Electrical Engineering 
Environmental Engineering 
Environmental Sciences 
Executive M.B.A. 
Forensic Science 
Gerontology 
Humanities 
Industrial Engineering 
Industrial Relations 
Mechanical Engineering 
Operations Research 
Organizational / Industrial Psychology 
Public Administration 
Senior Professional Certificates 
Taxation 



39 



Academic Programs 



Accounting 



Coordinator: Jeffrey L. WilUams, C.P.A., CM. A.; M.B.A., 
University of Bridgeport 

The overall objective of the Master of Science in accounting pro- 
gram is to provide a framework for accounting inquiry, devised in 
structure and content from the entire scope and process of accounting- 
information-based economic decision making. The existence of such a 
framework is intended to provide for graduate accountants and profes- 
sional practitioners an opportunity to share in the development and 
assessment of issues of accounting interest within a decision-making 
context. Accordingly, the M.S. program is structured to receive its ob- 
jective and direction from the overall objective of accounting- pro- 
viding information useful to the process of economic decision making. 

To accomplish this objective, the M.S. program offers a structure 
of studies designed to provide: 

1 . an examination of the foundations of economic decision making 
(foundation courses, 18 credits); 

2. an analysis of the role and usefulness of accounting information 
for economic decision making (core courses, 15 credits); and 

3. an opportunity for further selected specialization from the 
generally recognized branches or divisions of accounting in- 
quiry (electives, 9 credits). 

Each student, upon entering the program, will be assigned a 
faculty adviser who will assist the student throughout the program of 
study, particularly with the selection of suitable electives. The assigned 
faculty adviser will also act as, or assist in the selection of, the student's 
thesis adviser. 



ADMISSION POLICY 

Admission to the program is open to persons holding an under- 
graduate degree from an accredited institution, preferably, but not ex- 
clusively, in accounting or in business administration with a major in 
accounting. Persons holding other than the above degrees will be re- 
quired to take a number of selected undergraduate courses. Admission 
is based primarily on an applicant's undergraduate record; however, 
the promise of academic success is the essential factor for admission. In 
support of their applications, persons may submit their scores from the 
Admission Test for Graduate Study in Business. An applicant may be 
required to take this test. 



40 



Accounting 



Requirements for the degree 
Master of Science in accounting 

A minimum total of 42 credits will be required to earn the Master 
of Science in accounting. The transfer of credit from other institutions 
will be permitted subject to the Graduate School policy on transfer 
credit detailed elsewhere in this bulletin. 

THESIS 

All students are required to write a thesis. The thesis must show 
ability to organize material in a clear and original manner and present 
well -reasoned conclusions. 

The complete and final manuscript must be submitted to the thesis 
adviser prior to the end of the tenth week of the term in which the can- 
didate expects to complete the requirements for the degree. Thesis 
preparation and submission must comply with the Graduate School 
policy on Thesis detailed elsewhere in this bulletin. 



Program of study 

REQUIRED COURSES 

Course number and titie Credit 

Foundation courses 

EC 604 Macroeconomic Analysis 3 

EC 603 Microeconomic Analysis 3 

FI 651 Portfolio Management and Capital 

Market Analysis 3 

FI 615 Finance 3 

MG 637 Management 3 

OA 604 Probability and Statistics 3 

18 

Core courses 

A 650 Advanced Accounting Theory 3 

A 62 1 Managerial Accounting 3 

A 654 Financial Statements: Reporting and Analysis .... 3 

A 698 Thesis 6 

15 
Electives 9 

Total 42 



41 



A 


651 


A 


652 


A 


653 


A 


656 


FI 


649 



Academic Programs 



ELECTIVE COURSES 

Financial accounting specialization 

Financial Accounting Seminar 

Advanced Auditing 

Accounting for the Not-for-Profit Organizations 

International Accounting 

Security Analysis 

Managerial accounting specialization 

A 661 Managerial Accounting Seminar 

A 641 Accounting Information Systems 

A 642 Operational Auditing 

Fl 645 Corporate Financial Theory 

Taxation specialization 

A 604 Corporate Income Taxation I 
A 605 Corporate Income Taxation II 
One Taxation Elective 



Business Administration 



Coordinator: William S. Y. Pan, Ph.D. 
Columbia University 

The general purpose of the M.B.A. program at the University of 
New Haven is the education of men and women at the graduate level 
for careers in business administration as well as other job areas reguir- 
ing a sound grasp of business principles. The overall objective of the 
program is to enhance the student's perspective of managerial skills. 

The program has been designed to develop a professional point 
of view in managing an organization. It further develops the student's 
ability to utilize the newest analytical and guantitative technigues used 
in corporate decision making. The student is also exposed to an in- 
depth analysis of various theories of business and managerial behavior, 
emphasizing the business organization in relation to its internal and ex- 
ternal environment. 

Another important objective of the program is to afford the stu- 
dent an opportunity to develop special skills by concentrating in a 
given study area. 



42 



Business Administration 



Requirements for the degree 
Master of Business Administration 

A total of 48 credits, with or without a thesis, is required of candi- 
dates for the M.B.A. degree. 

If maximum waiver credit is granted, a student must complete a 
minimum of 30 credit hours for the M.B.A. degree. The residence re- 
quirement is also 30 graduate credit hours. Undergraduate courses 
may not be counted in meeting the minimum 30 credits required for 
the M.B.A. degree. 

Candidates for the M.B.A. degree are urged to write a thesis as 
part of the requirement for the degree. A thesis student has the oppor- 
tunity to work with a faculty member on a mutually determined 
research project. Candidates who elect not to write a thesis must take 
two additional courses in place of a thesis. 

Students in the M.B.A. program are expected to be familiar v\nth 
the use of computers in solving problems. The use of a computer is re- 
quired in a number of courses in the M.B.A. program. Students defi- 
cient in this area should register for IE 603C, Introduction to Digital 
Computers: COBOL. Students wishing to learn FORTRAN should 
register for IE 603F. However, a student will only be granted graduate 
credit for either IE 603C or IE 603F, not both. 

A student must complete the basic core before taking advanced 
courses in the M.B.A. program. The basic core consists of OA 604 
OA 605 and two from among P 619, MG 637, EC 603, EC 604 and 
EC 625. A student whose undergraduate degree is in a nonbusiness 
area may also be required, unless a waiver is granted, to take A 600, 
EC 600 and OA 600, which are noncredit graduate-level courses. 

WAIVER POLICY 

Required courses in the M.B.A. program may be waived on the 
basis of undergraduate courses taken at accredited institutions. For a 
course to be waived, a student must first secure the written approval of 
the department chairman or a faculty member acting for the chairman 
of the department in which the course is offered. 

A course that has been waived cannot be taken for elective credit. 

THESIS 

Students electing to write a thesis must register for thesis in the ap- 
propriate business department. The thesis must show ability to 
organize material in a clear and original manner and present well- 
reasoned conclusions. 

The thesis is written under the direction of the faculty member in 
charge of the departmental thesis program or a faculty member with 
special competence in the subject matter covered by the thesis. The 
complete and final manuscript must be submitted to the thesis adviser 



43 



Academic Programs 



prior to the end of the tenth week of the term in which the student ex- 
pects to complete the requirements for the degree. Thesis preparation 
and submission must comply with the Graduate School policy on 
Thesis /Seminar Project Requirements detailed elsewhere in this 
bulletin. 



Program off study 

REQUIRED COURSES 

Co urse n umber and title Credit 

EC 603 Microeconomic Analysis 3 

EC 604 Macroeconomic Analysis 3 

OA 604 Probability and Statistics 3 

OA 605 Advanced Statistics 3 

MK 609 Marketing 3 

FI 615 Finance 3 

MG 637 Management * 3 

P 619 Organizational Behavior 3 

A 62 1 Managerial Accounting 3 

EC 625 Industrial Relations 3 

Thesis * * 6 

Electives 12 

48 

* Students in the Health Care Management Concentration take 
MG 640 m place of MG 637. 
* * Candidates who elect not to write a thesis must take two additional 
business courses in place of thesis. 

CONCENTRATIONS 

Within the Master of Business Administration program, students 
are allowed to concentrate their studies in a specific area. There are 
several structured concentrations offered by various departments. 

A concentration consists of four courses taken in one area. With 
the permission of the adviser, students may substitute other ap- 
propriate courses for those listed as part of a concentration. 

Accounting 

Adviser: Jeffrey L. Williams, Associate Professor of Accounting, 
C.P.A., CM. A., M.B.A., University of Bridgeport 

A 650 Advanced Accounting Theory 
A 661 Managerial Accounting Seminar 

plus any two accounting or taxation electives 



44 



IE 


603 


IE 


604 


IE 


605 


IE 


606 


IE 


610 


IE 


614 



Business Administration 



Computer and information science 

Adviser: William S. Gere Jr., Associate Professor of Industrial 
Engineering, Ph.D., Carnegie-Mellon University 

four courses from tfie following: 

Introduction to Digital Computers 
Management Systems 
Advanced Business Programming 
Advanced Technical Programming 
Computer Systems Design 
Data Information Systems 

Economic forecasting 

Adviser: John J. Teluk, Associate Professor of Economics, M.A., Free 
University of Munich 

OA 607 Forecasting 

EC 653 Econometrics 

IE 603 F Introduction to Digital Computers: FORTRAN 

and one of the following: 

MG 633 Managerial Economics 

IE 606 Advanced Technical Programming 

EC 665 Urban and Regional Economic Development 

EC 690 Research Project 

MK 639 Marketing Research and Information Systems 

Finance 

Adviser: Jeffrey L. Williams 

FI 65 1 Portfolio Management and Capital Market Analysis 

FI 645 Corporate Financial Theory 

FI 617 Financial Institutions and Capital Markets 

and one of the following: 

FI 649 Security Analysis 

FI 655 Commodity Market Analysis 

FI 661 Real Estate: Principles and Practices 

FI 619 Monetary and Central Banking Policy 

Health care management 

Adviser: John R. Coleman, Associate Professor of Public 
Administration; Ph.D., University of Massachusetts 

MG 640 Management of Health Care Organizations (this 
course to be taken in place of MG 637 in the 
core of the M.B.A. program) 



45 



Academic Programs 



and four courses from the following; 

PA 642 Health Care Delivery Systems 

PA 645 Health Care Economics and Finance 

PA 643 Health and Institutional Planning 

PS 635 Law and the Public Health 

PA 644 Administration of Programs and Services 

for the Aged 

PA 641 Institutional Budgeting 



Hotel management, tourism and travel 

Adviser: Robert A. Elting, Associate Professor of Hotel Management, 
Ph.D., New York University 

Admission to the concentration in hotel management, tourism and 
travel requires permission of the concentration adviser; certain 
undergraduate courses may be required. 

four courses from the following: 

HM 610 Content Seminar in Hospitality /Institutional/ 

Tourism Administration 
HM 625 Supervisory and Leadership Analysis in Tourism, 

Hospitality and Institutional Operations 
HM 630 Personnel and Labor Relations in the Tourism/ 

Hospitality/Institutional Fields 
HM 640 Haute Cuisine for Hospitality Executives 
HM 655 Development of Hotel /Restaurant /Institutional 

Food Services 

International business 

Adviser: Kevin McCrohan, Associate Professor of Marketing; 
Ph.D., City University of New York 

four courses from the following: 

IB 643 International Business Operations 

MG 660 Comparative Management 

IB 651 Comparative Marketing 

IB 652 Multinational Business Operations 

IB 644 Import and Export Business 

EC 641 International Economics 

Management and organization 

Adviser: William S. Y. Pan, Assistant Professor of Management 
Science, Ph.D., Columbia University 



46 



Business Administration 



hur courses from the following: 

MG 660 Comparative Management 

MG 661 Development of Management Thought 

MG 662 Organization Theory 

MG 663 Leadership in Organizations 

MG 664 Organizational Effectiveness 

MG 669 Business Policy and Strategy 

MG 680 Current Topics in Business Administration 

MG 692 Readings in Management 

Management science 

Adviser: William S. Y. Pan 

IE 601 Introduction to Operations Research /Management 

Science 
IE 604 Management Systems 
OA 606 Advanced Management Science 
OA 607 Forecasting 

Marketing 

Adviser: Kevin McCrohan 

MK 639 Marketing Research and Information Systems 
MK 641 Marketing Management 
MK 643 Product Management 

One other course in marketing 

Media in business 

Adviser: Marilou McLaughlin, Associate Professor of Communication, 
Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 

CO 601 is a prerequisite to all of the subsequent courses. 

CO 601 Basics of Business Media Production Techniques 

CO 605 Planning Audio Visual Systems for Business 

CO 609 Scripting the Media Presentation 

CO 6 1 3 Media Presentations for Business 

Operations research 

Adviser: William S. Gere Jr. 

IE 607 Probability Theory 

IE 621 Linear Programming 

IE 622 Queuing Theory 

IE 686 Inventory Analysis 



47 



Academic Programs 



Hotel management option 

Coordinator: Robert A. Elting, Associate Professor of Hotel 
Management, Tourism and Travel, Ph.D., New York University 

This program, leading to the Master of Business Administration 
degree with the hotel management option, is designed for those who 
have completed an undergraduate degree program in hospitality ad- 
ministration or a related major. The student who is not an 
undergraduate hospitality graduate will be permitted to complete the 
reguired undergraduate course work while satisfying the requirements 
for the M.B.A. 

THESIS 

Students electing to write a thesis must obtain the approval of the 
coordinator for a proposal prior to registration. The thesis must 
demonstrate ability to organize material in a clear and original manner 
and present well-reasoned conclusions. 

The thesis is written under the direction of the faculty member in 
charge of the departmental thesis program or a faculty member with 
special competence in the subject matter covered by the thesis. The 
complete and final manuscript must be submitted to the thesis adviser 
prior to the end of the tenth week of the term in which the student ex- 
pects to complete the requirements for the degree. 

Thesis preparation and submission must comply with the 
Graduate School policy on Thesis /Seminar Project Requirements 
detailed elsewhere in this bulletin. 



Program off study 

REQUIRED COURSES 

Course number and titie Credit 

EC 603 Microeconomic Analysis 3 

EC 604 Macroeconomic Analysis 3 

OA 604 Probability and Statistics 3 

MK 609 Marketing 3 

FI 615 Finance 3 

MG 637 Management 3 

P 619 Organizational Behavior 3 

A 62 1 Managerial Accounting 3 

EC 625 Industrial Relations 3 

HM698 Thesis* 6 

Electives * * 3 

36 



48 



EXial Degree 



Core Courses 

HM 610 Content Seminar in Hospitality/ 

Institutional/Tourism Administration 3 

HM 640 Haute Cuisine for Hospitality Executives 3 

HM 655 Development of Hotel/Restaurant/ 

Institutional Food Services 3 

HM 690 Research in Tourism /Hospitality/ 

Institutional Administration 3 

12 
ELECTIVE COURSES* * 

HM 625 Supervisory and Leadership Analysis in 

Tourism/Hospitality/lnstitutional Field 
HM 630 Personnel and Labor Relations in the 

Tourism/Hospitality/Institutional Fields 

Candidates who elect not to write a thesis may substitute two ap- 
proved courses in the areas of hospitality, institutional food service, 
tourism administration or business. 
* * Elective courses are to be chosen in consultation with an adviser. 



POSSIBLE ADDITIONAL UNDERGRADUATE 
COURSE REQUIREMENTS 

, Those candidates who have not completed undergraduate 
hospitality degree programs will be required to complete 24 to 36 
credits of undergraduate hospitality administration courses. These 
courses will depend upon background in the field, work experience 
and related course work completed. 

The Undergraduate Bulletin of the university lists descriptions of 
these courses. 



Business Administration/ 
Industrial Engineering 
Dual degree program 

-* 

Coordinator: William S. Gere Jr., Associate Professor of Industrial 
Engineering, Ph.D., Carnegie -Mellon University. 



49 



Academic Programs 



The Graduate School has always encouraged interdisciplinary- 
studies. To foster a broader expertise in the areas of business adminis- 
tration and industrial engineering, a student can now earn both the 
Master of Business Administration and the Master of Science in In- 
dustrial Engineering by successfully completing the Dual Degree Pro- 
gram. The program is intended for students with undergraduate 
engineering or technical degrees from ECPD accredited schools. 



Requirements for the dual degree 
Master of Business Administration/ 
Master of Science in Industrial Engineering 

The basic M.B.A./M.S.I.E. program consists of 72 credit hours. 
Up to 12 of these credit hours may be waived on the basis of under- 
graduate course work, leaving a minimum requirement of 60 credit 
hours. All waivers must be approved in writing by the appropriate 
department and are conditional upon subsequent academic per- 
formance. 

Graduate credit may be transferred from other accredited institu- 
tions subject to the Graduate School policy on transfer credit detailed 
elsewhere in this bulletin. In all cases, the residence requirement for the 
two degrees shall be 60 credit hours completed at the University of 
New Haven. In addition, a minimum of 21 credit hours must be earned 
in business courses and a minimum of 2 1 credit hours must be earned 
in engineering courses. 

THESIS 

All students must write either a thesis or a seminar project. The 
thesis or project must show ability to organize material in a clear and 
original manner and present well-reasoned conclusions. 

The thesis/project is written under the direction of the faculty 
member in charge of the departmental program or a faculty member 
with special competence in the subject matter covered by the thesis/ 
project. The complete and final manuscript must be submitted to the 
thesis/project adviser prior to the end of the tenth week of the term in 
which the candidate expects to complete the requirements for the 
degree. 

Thesis preparation and submission must comply with Graduate 
School policy on Thesis detailed elsewhere in this bulletin. 



50 



Community Psychology 



Program of study 

REQUIRED COURSES 

Course number and title Credit 

A 62 1 Managerial Accounting 3 

FI 615 Finance 3 

MK 609 Marketing 3 

OA 605 Advanced Statistics 3 

MG 637 Management 3 

EC 625 Industrial Relations 3 

EC 603 Microeconomic Analysis 3 

EC 604 Macroeconomic Analysis 3 

P 619 Organizational Behavior, or 

P 620 Industrial Psychology 3 

IE 601 Introduction to Operations Research/ 

Management Science 3 

IE 602 Quality Analysis 3 

IE 603 F Introduction to Digital Computers (FORTRAN) ... 3 

IE 604 Management Systems 3 

IE 607 Probability Theory 3 

IE 62 1 Linear Programming 3 

IE 65 1 Human Engineering I 3 

IE 686 Inventory Analysis 3 

Electives (Business) 6 

Electives (IE or Math) 6 

. 63 

plus either: 

Project (Business or IE) 3 

Electives (Unrestricted) 6 

or: 

Thesis 6 

Electives (Unrestricted) 3 

_9 

72 



Community Psychology 



Coordinator: Robert J. Hoffnung, Associate Professor of Psychology, 
Ph.D., University of Cincinnati 



51 



Academic Programs 



The general purpose of the Master of Arts program in community 
psychology is to provide training at the graduate level for careers in 
human services delivery systems utilized in community mental health 
centers and community action programs. Specifically, the program 
strives to: 

1 . develop and enlarge the student's appreciation of the complex- 
ities, interrelationships and problems that characterize the com- 
munity; 

2. prepare students to utilize psychological backgrounds to solve 
contemporary community problems; 

3. foster development of problem -solving strategies which enhance 
mental health, educational and personality development; and 

4. train students in performance characteristics as members of 
research teams, therapeutic teams, and public information teams 
working under professional guidance. 

A collateral objective is to provide graduate training in the late 
afternoon and early evening for the convenience of men and women 
who are employed on a full-time basis. 



ADMISSION POLICY 

Applicants are expected to possess social and interpersonal 
characteristics which will support success in human service occu- 
pations. 

Students who give evidence of sustained interest m community 
and human service and who hold an undergraduate degree from an 
accredited college or university are eligible for admission. 

Applicants are required to complete a questionnaire to be submit- 
ted directly to the Graduate School and may be required to submit 
scores from either the Miller Analogies Test or the Graduate Record 
Examination Aptitude Test. An undergraduate major in psychology is 
not specitically required as a basis for consideration. However, all stu- 
dents are expected to have at least an introductory level understanding 
of psychological concepts, principles, and methods before taking 
courses in the Master of Arts in community psychology program. 



Requirements for the degree 

Master of Arts in community psychology 

A total of 39 credit hours is required for \he Master of Arts in com- 
munity psychology degree. Candidates for this degree will be re- 
quired to complete 21 credit hours of core curriculum courses, in- 
cluding three terms of held experience and practicum. 

Eighteen of the 39 credit hours are electives chosen after consulta- 



52 



Community Psychology 



tion with a departmental adviser to help pursue individual academic 
and professional goals. The organization of the Master of Arts in com- 
munity psychology program is such that elective courses constitute a 
very small part of the first year's work but become the major constit- 
uents of the second year. 

TRANSFER CREDIT 

Transfer credit may be given for graduate course work com- 
pleted at other accredited institutions, subject to the Graduate School 
policy on transfer credit detailed elsewhere in this bulletin. 

THESIS 

Students electing to write a thesis must register for P 698 Thesis I 
and P 699 Thesis II. The thesis must show ability to organize materials 
in a clear and original manner and present well -reasoned conclusions. 

The thesis is written under the direction of the faculty member in 
charge of the thesis seminar or a faculty member with special com- 
petence in the subject matter of the thesis. The complete and final 
manuscript must be submitted to the thesis adviser prior to the end of 
the tenth week of the term in which the candidate expects to complete 
the requirements for the degree. 

Thesis preparation and submission must comply with the 
Graduate School policy on Thesis detailed elsewhere in this bulletin. 

FIELD EXPERIENCE AND PRACTICUM SEMINAR 

The field-study courses will be integrated with the instructional 
courses of the program. While the field -study courses are shaped by 
the agency program in which they occur, the students simultaneously 
carry on a rich program of reading. For each field-study term, the 
students will be required to prepare a plan of experience under the 
guidance of their advisers. At the end of each term the students will 
submit reports on their experience, skill development and insights. 

A salient characteristic of the field experience and practicum 
seminar sequence involves the role of the field experience coordinator 
who works with the students both at the site of the field experience and 
in the practicum seminar. 



Program of study 

REQUIRED COURSES 

Course number and title Credit 

P 605 Survey of Community Psychology 3 

P 607 Special Problems in Community Psychology 3 



53 



Academic Programs 



P 609 Research Methods 3 

P 610 Program Evaluation in Community Psychology ... 3 
P 611 Field Experience and Practicum Seminar I: 

The Dyadic Relationship 3 

P 612 Field Experience and Practicum Seminar 11: 

Models of Consultation 3 

P 613 Field Experience and Practicum Seminar III; 

Systems Intervention 3 

Electives* 18 

*To be selected after consultation with a departmental adviser. 39 



Computer and Information 
Science 



Coordinator: William S. Gere Jr., Associate Professor of Industrial 
Engineering, Ph.D., Carnegie -Mellon University 

The Master of Science in computer and information science cur- 
riculum is an interdisciplinary program with a software orientation. It is 
designed to provide a high-level academic background for CIS 
managers and systems analysts in all career areas. A wide selection of 
electives allows students to concentrate in either technical or business 
applications. 



Requirements for the degree 
Master of Science in computer 
and information science 

The basic program consists of 48 credit hours. Required courses 
may be waived on the basis of undergraduate courses taken at ac- 
credited institutions. 

All waivers must be approved in writing by the industrial engi- 
neering department, and are conditional upon subsequent academic 
performance. The transfer of credit from other institutions will be per- 
mitted subject to the Graduate School policy on transfer credit detailed 
elsewhere in this bulletin. 



54 



Computer and Information Science 



SEMINAR PROJECT 

The program requires all students to complete IE 690 Seminar 
Project. This requirement is met by the preparation of a relevant 
seminar project report, prepared under the direction of a faculty ad- 
viser. The complete and final manuscript must be submitted to the proj- 
ect adviser prior to the end of the tenth week of the term in which the 
candidate expects to complete the requirements for the degree For 
further specifications, see Research Projects, Seminar Projects and In- 
dependent Study Requirements detailed elsewhere in tins bulletin It is 
suggested that a student begin work on the seminar project after hav- 
ing completed at least 15 credit hours. 

In certain cases, students who routinely complete projects similar 
to the required Seminar Project as a part of their professional duties 
may petition to satisfy the Seminar Project requirement by taking two 
advanced industrial engineering electives in place of the project Such 
a substitiition must have the prior written approval of the program 
coordinator. 



Program of study 

Required courses 

Course n umber and title Credit 

IE 603 C Introduction to Digital Computers (COBOL), or 
IE 603 F Introduction to Digital Computers (FORTRAN) ... 3 
M 610 Fundamentals of Calculus and Linear Algebra .... 3 

IE 604 Management Systems 3 

IE 614 Data Information Systems 3 

EE 615 Computer Logic and Intelligence . 3 

IE 601 Inti:'oduction to Operations Research/ 

Management Science 3 

IE 605 Advanced Business Programming, or 

IE 606 Advanced Technical Programming 3 

IE 610 Computer Systems Selection 3 

IE 690 Seminar Project 3 

Electives (I.E., Math, or E.E.). ............... 9 

Electives j 2 

48 



55 



Academic Programs 



Criminal Justice 



Director: Richard E. Farmer, Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice, 
Ed. D., Boston University 

The President's Commission on Law Enforcement and Administra- 
tion of Justice assigned a high priority to the task of improving the 
education and training of personnel entrusted with the administration 
of criminal justice in the United States. 

A key objective of the Master of Science in criminal justice pro- 
gram is the training and education of men and women planning 
careers in the field of criminal justice as well as the advanced training 
and education of the men and women who staff the agencies and in- 
stitutions of the criminal justice system. 

The university views the criminal justice system as one continuous 
integrated process from a study of the nature of deviant behavior to the 
role of rehabilitation and parole. 

The program stresses a broad understanding of the social and 
behavioral sciences, the institutions of the criminal justice system, and 
the development of methodological tools and skills. This is done 
somewhat at the expense of courses that are narrowly professional in 
the belief that the field of criminal justice is dynamic and that a broad 
understanding of the social and behavioral sciences and the 
methodological skills and tools will prove more valuable to a student's 
career in the long run than narrow professional training. 

The broad fields of the criminal justice program at the university 
are social and behavioral science, the institutions of the criminal justice 
system and methodological tools and skills. 

The courses in the area of social and behavioral science stress the 
theories of the behavior of man in a social order and the sanctions im- 
posed by different societies to control the social behavior of their 
members. 

Courses in the area of criminal justice institutions stress the study 
of the existing system from the police, through the courts, the peniten- 
tiaries, and the system of probation and parole. 

The methodological courses expose students to the tools of 
research and analysis and the contribution of systems analysis to the ef- 
ficient administration of the criminal justice system. 

ADMISSION POLICY 

In addition to the general Graduate School admission re- 
quirements, all criminal justice applicants must take the Aptitude Test of 
the Graduate Record Examination or the Miller Analogies Test as part 
of the admission proceduce. GRE applications are available in the 
Graduate Office or by writing directly to the Educational Testing Ser- 
vice, Princeton, N.J. Miller Analogies Test may be taken at the UNH 



56 



Criminal Justice 



Counseling Center. Applicants are also required to complete a ques- 
tionnaire to be submitted directly to the Graduate School. 

Requirements for the degree 
Master of Science in criminal justice 

A total of 45 credit hours is required of candidates for the degree 
of Master of Science of criminal justice. 

Candidates must complete 2 1 credit hours of required courses in 
the core curriculum. After consultation with their adviser, students 
select 24 credit hours of electives from approved courses in the depart- 
ments of criminal justice, economics, psychology, political science, 
sociology, industrial engineering and management science. 

The transfer of credit from other institutions v\nll be permitted sub- 
ject to the Graduate School policy on transfer credit detailed elsewhere 
in this bulletin. 

THESIS 

Students electing to write a thesis must register for thesis with the 
department. The thesis must show ability to organize material in a clear 
and original manner and present well -reasoned conclusions. 

The thesis is written under the direction of the faculty member in 
charge of the departmental thesis program or a faculty member with 
special competence in the subject matter covered by the thesis. The 
complete and final manuscript must be submitted to the thesis adviser 
prior to the end of the tenth week of the term in which the student ex- 
pects to complete the requirements for the degree. 

Thesis preparation and submission must comply with the 
Graduate School policy on Thesis Requirements detailed elsewhere in 
this bulletin. 



Program of study 

REQUIRED COURSES 

Course number and title Credit 

CJ 601 Seminar in Interpersonal Relations 3 

CJ 605 Social Deviance 3 

CJ 610 Administration of Justice 3 

CJ 628 Introduction to Systems Theory 3 

CJ 635 Statistics in the Public Sector 3 

CJ 637 Contemporary Issues in Criminal Justice 3 

CJ 642 Research Techniques in the Social Sciences 3 

Electives (Approved) 24 

45 



57 



Academic Programs 



Electrical Engineering 



Coordinator: Gerald J. Kirwin, Professor of Electrical Engineering, 
Ph.D., Syracuse University 

This program is intended to meet the needs of professionally 
employed engineers and scientists for academic work beyond the bac- 
calaureate level. It has been designed to deepen the understanding of 
modem analysis and synthesis techniques as they apply to engineering 
design. A major goal of this program is to provide a thorough discus- 
sion of the characteristics of the latest devices and systems and of their 
applications in current engineering design. Both analytical and 
numerical procedures are developed with particular emphasis on the 
use of computers for problem solving and as elements in larger 
systems. 

The program centers on a core sequence which all students are 
expected to take. The core courses contain advanced methods of 
analysis and design which are of common interest to electrical 
engineers. Each student completes a program by electing courses that 
are particularly suited to current personal professional interests. In 
general the elective courses must be chosen from those listed below. 
Early in the program the student, with the help and approval of an ad- 
viser, prepares a detailed plan insuring an overall educational ex- 
perience that is integrated and logical. All decisions regarding both 
core and elective courses are subject to the final approval of the 
student's adviser. 

ADMISSION POLICY 

Admission to the program is open to persons holding an 
undergraduate engineering degree from an institution accredited by 
the Engineers Council for Professional Development (ECPD). Though 
admission decisions are based primarily on an applicant's 
undergraduate record, the promise of academic success is the essential 
factor for admission. 



Requirements for the degree 

Master of Science in electrical engineering 

A minimum total of 39 credit hours must be completed to earn the 
Master of Science in electrical engineering degree. The transfer of 
credit from other institutions will be permitted subject to the Graduate 
School policy on transfer credit detailed elsewhere in this bulletin. 



58 



Electrical Engineering 



THESIS 

There is no specific thesis requirement for the Master of Science in 
electrical engineering. However, students are encouraged to submit a 
thesis proposal covering applied research in an area of mutual interest 
to the student and a supervising member of the faculty. If a proposal 
shows promise of yielding a worthwhile contribution to ^e professional 
objectives of the student, and a faculty member accepts the role of 
supervisor, the student may embark upon the research and earn 6 
elective credits. Students electing to do a thesis project will be ex- 
pected -to make an oral presentation of the results of the project. 

The complete and filial manuscript must be submitted to the thesis 
adviser prior to the end of the tenth week of the term in which the can- 
didate expects to complete the requirements for the degree. Thesis 
preparation and submission must comply with the Graduate School 
policy on Thesis /Seminar Project Requirements detailed elsewhere in 
this bulletin. 

The thesis is deposited permanently in the library. Students are re- 
quired to submit two copies of the thesis for the library. Additional 
copies of the thesis are usually required. For this requirement and 
other regulations regarding the preparation of a thesis, students should 
consult the "Manual for the Preparation of Graduate Theses and 
Seminar Projects." Copies of the manual are available in the Graduate 
School Office. 



Program of study 

REQUIRED COURSES 

Course number and titie Credit 

EE 60 1 Engineering Analysis I 3 

EE 602 Engineering Analysis II 3 

M 620 Numerical Analysis 3 

IE 685 Theory of Optimization 3 

EE 603 Discrete and Continuous Systems I 3 

EE 604 Discrete and Continuous Systems II 3 

EE 630 Electronic Instrumentation I 3 

EE 640 Computer Engineering I 3 

EE 650 Random Signal Analysis 3 

Electives (Approved) ' 1 2 

39 

ELECTIVE COURSES 

EE 605 Modem Control Systems 
EE 608 Computer Aided Design 
EE 631 Electronic Instrumentation II 



59 



Academic Programs 


EE 


634 


Digital Signal Processing I 


EE 


635 


Digital Signal Processing 11 


EE 


641 


Computer Engineering 11 


EE 


645 


Power Systems Engineering 1 


EE 


646 


Power Systems Engineering 11 


EE 


658 


Microprocessors -Theory and Applications 


EE 


670 


Special Topics -Electrical Engineering 


EE 


695 


Independent Study I 


EE 


696 


Independent Study II 


EE 


698 


Thesis 1 


EE 


699 


Thesis 11 



Environmental Engineering 



Coordinator: George R. Carson, Associate Professor of Civil 
Engineering, M.S.C.E., Columbia University; Professional Engineer 
(New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, Massachusetts); Land 
Surveyor (Connecticut, Massachusetts) 

The environmental engineering program is intended to meet the 
needs of engineers for academic work beyond the baccalaureate level. 
The program is interdisciplinary in nature and incorporates both 
engineering and science courses. 

There exists today a need for a substantial number of engineers 
knowledgeable in environmental areas. Industries which are reguired 
to control the pollution of air and water need environmental engineers. 
Federal, state and local governments must hire employees and con- 
sultants to assist them in environmental matters. Other new vistas will 
undoubtedly open to the environmental engineers in the future. En- 
vironmental engineers will be in increasingly greater demand with the 
continually increasing problems of pollution. 

The recognition and solution of environmental problems are 
largely the responsibility of engineers and scientists. To perform effec- 
tively in this massive effort, they must be technically competent as well 
as knowledgeable in social and economic matters. 

This program provides the advanced educational skills necessary 
to meet the ever increasing need for engineers with an environmental 
background. It is designed to offer vigorous, professionally oriented, 
engineering and science courses in the areas of solid waste, water and 
air pollution. 

Approximately two -thirds of the program consists of a reguired 
sequence of courses which each student must complete. The balance 
of the program consists of courses selected from the list of electives. 
Selection will_be based on the student's principal field of interest. Each 



60 



Environmental Engineering 



student, upon entering this program, will be assigned a faculty adviser 
who will consult with the student during the program of study and will 
assist the student in selection of suitable electives. The faculty adviser 
will also act as the student's research project adviser. 

ADMISSION POLICY 

Candidates for admission in the environmental engineering pro- 
gram are expected to have an engineering degree from an institution 
accredited by the Engineers Council for Professional Development. 



Requirements for the degree 

Master of Science in environmental engineering 

A total of 39 credit hours must be completed to earn the Master of 
Science in environmental engineering degree. The transfer of credit 
from other institutions will be permitted subject to the Graduate School 
policy on transfer credit detailed elsewhere in this bulletin. 



Program of study 

REQUIRED COURSES 

Course number and tide Credit 

CE 601 Water Treatment 3 

CE 602 Wastewater Treatment .'.... 3 

CE 605 Solid Waste Management 3 

CE 606 Environmental Law and Legislation, or 

EC 608 Economics for Public Administrators 3 

CIT 60 1 Environmental Chemistry 3 

SC 60 1 Ecology for Environmental Engineers 3 

SC 602 Pollutants and the Aquatic Environment, or 

SC 603 Air Pollution 3 

CE 612 Advanced Wastewater Treatment 3 

CE 613 Industrial Wastewater Control 3 

CE 690 Research Project 3 

Electives (CE) .'3 

Electives (Approved) 6 

39 



61 



Academic Programs 



Environmental Sciences 



Coordinator: Dennis L. Kalma, Associate Professor of Science and 
Biology, Ph.D., Yale University 

The environmental sciences program is intended to meet the 
needs of scientists for academic work in environmental studies beyond 
the baccalaureate level. The program is interdisciplinary in nature and 
incorporates science and engineering courses. This program is de- 
signed to accommodate the student with a degree in one of the natural 
sciences. 

knowledgeable in environmental areas. Industries which are required 
to control the pollution of air and water need environmental scientists. 
Federal, state and local governments must hire employees and con- 
sultants to assist them in environmental matters. Other new vistas will 
undoubtedly open to the environmental scientists of the future. En- 
vironmental scientists will be in increasingly greater demand with the 
continually increasing problems of pollution. 

The recognition and solution of environmental problems are 
largely the responsibility of scientists and engineers. To perform effec- 
tively in this massive effort, they must be technically competent as well 
as knowledgeable in social and economic matters. 

This program provides the advanced educational skills necessary 
to meet the ever increasing need for scientists with an environmental 
background. It is designed to offer vigorous, professionally oriented, 
science and engineering courses in the areas of solid waste, water and 
air pollution. 

Approximately two -thirds of the program consists of a required 
sequence of courses which each student must complete. The balance 
of the program consists of courses selected from a list of electives. 
Selection will be based on the student's principal field of interest. Each 
student, upon entering this program, will be assigned a faculty adviser 
who will consult with the student during the program of study and will 
assist in selection of suitable electives. 

ADMISSION POLICY 

Candidates for admission to the environmental sciences program 
would be expected to have a degree in one of the natural sciences in 
which certain prerequisite courses have been completed. Students 
without these courses would be admitted to the program after com- 
pleting these prerequisites. 



62 



Environmental Sciences/Executive Master of Business Administration 

Requirements for the degree 

Master of Science in environmental sciences 

A total of 42 credit hours must be completed to earn the Master of 
Science in environmental sciences degree. The transfer of credit earned 
at other institutions will be permitted subject to the Graduate School 
policy on transfer credit detailed elsewhere in this bulletin. 

Program of study 

REQUIRED COURSES 

Course number and titie Credit 

CE 60 1 Water Treatment, or 

CE 602 Wastewater Treatment 3 

CE 605 Solid Waste Management 3 

CE 606 Environmental Law and Legislation, or 

EC 608 Economics for Public Administrators 3 

CH 60 1 Environmental Chemistry 3 

SC 601 Ecology for Environmental Engineers 3 

SC 602 Pollutants and the Aquatic Environment 3 

SC 603 Air Pollution "3 

SC 608 Water Quality .3 

SC 612 Freshwater and Marine Biology 3 

SC 698-9 ThesisI&II ".'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.". 6 

Electives (Approved) 9 

42 



Executive Master of 
Business Administration 



Director: Gilbert L. Whiteman, Associate Dean of the Graduate 
School, Associate Professor of Communication, Ph.D., 
Michigan State University 

The Graduate School and the School of Business Administration 
offer, an Executive Master of Business Administration (Executive 
M.B.A.) degree for high-level executives with extensive managerial 
experience. The program is designed specifically in consideration of 
managerial responsibilities and existing time constraints. 



63 



Academic Programs 



The Executive M.B.A. degree program is a two-year, part-time 
degree program organized to meet the educational needs and ex- 
ecutive responsibilities of corporate and institutional leaders. Individual 
participation is emphasized through class discussions and cooperation 
with others in the class. Each class is generally limited to between 15 
and 20 students. Class members commence and conclude the pro- 
gram as a group. 

No graduate transfer credit is accepted into the Executive M.B.A. 
program. Admission to the Executive M.B.A. degree program is by 
special application, the form for which may be obtained from the 
EMBA Program Director. Classes commence in September and 
January, providing a sufficient number of gualified applicants have ap- 
plied from which proper selection may be made. An admission com- 
mittee screens the applications to insure proper selection. Although 
students are required to complete the Graduate Management Admis- 
sion Test (GMAT), other important factors such as current position, 
length of top management experience and prior formal education are 
important factors in the selection process. The selection committee at- 
tempts to provide from among the applicants those individuals who will 
bring a diverse grouping of managerial skills and experiences, thereby 
allowing the students to learn from each other as well as from the 
faculty. 

The program consists of twenty courses scheduled into two, ten- 
month academic calendar years. Each course is four sessions in length. 
All classes meet one afternoon/early evening per week in designated 
off -campus conference facilities for participant convenience. Par- 
ticipants must agree in advance to attend all classes except for 
emergencies. They must be prepared to devote additional time for 
class preparation and reading assignments. 

Upon completion of the program, participants will be awarded 
the degree of Master of Business Administration (The Executive 
Program). 

Information concerning admission procedures and the academic 
calendar may be obtained by writing to the EMBA Program Director. 



Program of study 

REQUIRED COURSES 

Course number and title Credit 

EXID 903 The Communication Process P/2 

EXID 906 The Management Process 1 V2 

EXID 909 Business and Government Relations 1 V2 

EXID 912 Financial Accounting IVi 

EXID 9 1 5 Quantitative Decision Making 1 V2 

EXID 9 1 8 Managerial Economics ,..11/2 

EXID 92 1 Executive Development Seminar 1 V2 



64 



Forensic Science 



EXID 924 Financial Management I 11/2 

EXID 927 Financial Management II 1 1/2 

EXID 930 Marketing Management 1 1/2 

EXID 933 International Business Seminar 1 '/2 

EXID 936 Logistics and Distribution 1 1/2 

EXID 939 Operations Research and Management 1 1/2 

EXID 942 Managerial Accounting 1 1/2 

EXID 945 Human Resource Management 1 1/2 

EXID 948 Labor-Management Relations 1 1/2 

EXID 95 1 Marketing Management Seminar 1 '/2 

EXID 954 Organizational Development 1 '/2 

EXID 957 Corporate Policy and Strategy 1 1/2 

EXID 960 The Executive Seminar 1 1/2 

30 



Forensic Science 



Director: Henry C. Lee, Associate Professor of Criminal lustice, 
Ph.D., New York University 

Forensic Science is a broad interdisciplinary field in which the 
natural sciences are employed to analyze and evaluate physical evi- 
dence related to matters of law. The interdisciplinary forensic science 
program will provide the advanced technical background for profes- 
sionals in the forensic science field as well as for those in allied fields, 
such as pathology, law, criminal justice administration, security, in- 
vestigation in various areas (crime, fire, insurance), environmental 
studies and chemistry, for whom knowledge of forensic science con- 
cepts and metiiods is vital for the advancement of professional per- 
formance. 

The Master of Science in forensic science program stresses not 
only tiie up-dated analytical scientific methods, but also the broad 
understanding of forensic science concepts. The program centers on a 
core sequence of courses which all stijdents are expected to complete. 
Advanced concentration can then be either in criminalistics or ad- 
ministration. 

ADMISSION POLICY 

For admission to the Master of Science in forensic science pro- 
gram, a stijdent must have an undergraduate degree in a natijral or 
related science. Applicants with deficiencies in one or more areas may 
be provisionally accepted and will be required to complete the ap- 



65 



Academic Programs 



propriate courses during the early stage of the program before being 
fully matriculated. Applicants must take the aptitude test of the 
Graduate Record Examination or the Miller Analogies Test, and com- 
plete a questionnaire to be submitted directly to the Graduate School. 



Requirements for the degree 

Master of Science in forensic science 

Candidates are required to complete 40 credit hours of graduate 
work, including an internship in a forensic science laboratory or equal 
work with other related agencies. The transfer of credit from other in- 
stitutions will be permitted subject to the Graduate School policy on 
transfer credit detailed elsewhere in this bulletin. 

THESIS 

Students electing to write a thesis must register for thesis credit 
with the department. The thesis must show an ability to organize 
material in a clear and original manner, and present well -reasoned 
conclusions. Thesis preparation and submission must comply with 
graduate school regulations detailed elsewhere in this bulletin. 

The forensic science laboratory of the university is available for 
research, and the laboratory maintains close contact with various 
laboratories in the area to afford students the opportunity to observe, 
study and learn from many outstanding forensic scientists. 



Program of study 

REQUIRED COURSES 

Course number and title Credit 

CJ 647 Advanced Criminalistics I 4 

CJ 648 Advanced Criminalistics II 4 

CJ 657 Physical Analysis in Forensic Science 4 

CJ 659 Biomedical Methods in Forensic Science 4 

ADDITIONAL COURSES MAY BE TAKEN 
FROM THE FOLLOWING AREAS: 

Basic science electives 

CH 6 1 1 Special Topics in Advanced Organic Chemistry . . 3 

CH 62 1 Chemical Forensic Analysis with Laboratory 4 

CH 63 1 Advanced Instrumentation with Laboratory 4 



66 



Gerontology 



Other courses will be developed during the 1979-1980 school 
year. Study will include courses in pathology, immunology and 
serology, scientific photographic documentation, JDiochemistry, foren- 
sic medicine, advanced forensic serology and forensic toxicology. 

Criminal justice electives 

CJ 608 Law and Evidence 

CJ 610 Administration of Justice 

CJ 615 Forensic Science in the Administration of Justice 

CJ 628 Introduction to Systems Theory 

CJ 637 Contemporary Issues in Criminal Justice 

CJ 690 Research Project I 

CJ 691 Research Project II 

CJ 693 Criminal Justice Internship I 

CJ 694 Criminal Justice Internship II 

CJ 695 Independent Study 

Other electives 

Up to nine credits of electives may be chosen from related areas 
within the graduate curriculum. 



Gerontology 



Coordinator: Judith B. Gordon, Associate Professor of Sociology, 

Ph.D., University of Michigan 

The gerontology program is designed for both the practicing pro- 
fessional and those interested in the field of gerontology. 

Gerontology is an interdisciplinary field. The core curriculum ex- 
poses students to the fundamental insights and perspectives of 
sociology, social welfare, political science, psychology and administra- 
tion, and aids students to compare and contrast these disciplines. The 
program is designed to expose students to crucial skills necessary to 
function effectively as gerontological professionals and to prepare 
them to pursue leadership roles in the field. 

The gerontology program is suitable for government employees, 
health care professionals and program administrators working in the 
field of aging, and for those considering such careers now or in the 
future. 



67 



Academic Programs 



ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 



Prospective students must fulfill the admission requirements of the 
Graduate School. In addition, they may be required to fulfill additional 
requirements set by the Committee on Studies in Gerontology. 



Requirements for the degree 
Master of Arts in gerontology 

Each degree candidate will complete an 18-hour core curriculum, 
and either the 21 -hour concentration in psycho-social studies or the 
21 -hour concentration in administrative studies. A total of 39 credit 
hours is required for the degree. The transfer of credit from other insti- 
tutions will be permitted subject to the Graduate School policy on 
transfer credit detailed elsewhere in this bulletin. All waivers must be 
approved in writing by the program coordinator. 



Program of study 

REQUIRED CORE COURSES 

Course number and titie Credit 

SO 65 1 Social Gerontology . . . . : 3 

P 672 Psychology of the Middle and Later Years 3 

PA 644 Administration of Programs and Services 

for the Aged 3 

PS 633 The Political Process and the Aged 3 

SC 642 Physical Aging 3 

SO 652 Seminar in Gerontology '. 3 

18 

Students are expected to take SO 651, Social Gerontology, early 
in their studies, and SO 652 toward the end of the program. 

Concentration in psycho-social relations 

SO 641 Death and Suicide 3 

SW 651 Social Work with the Elderly I: 

Individuals, Families and Groups 3 

SW 652 Human Services with the Elderly II: 

Programs, Planning, Policies 3 

9 



68 



Humanities 



Three courses such as: 

P 623 Psychology of the Group 3 

P 625 Advanced Psychology of Human Development ... 3 

P 630 Psychology of Personality 3 

P 632 Group Dynamics and Group Treatment 3 

P 636 Abnormal Psychology 3 

9 
Electives 3 

21 

Students with no prior working experience in gerontology are 
strongly advised to undertake a field work practicum. 

Concentration in administrative studies 

P 619 Organizational Behavior 3 

PA 604 Seminar in Communities and Social Change 3 

PA 64 1 Institutional Budgeting 3 

PA 643 Health and Institutional Planning 3 

A Management Science elective, by advisement . . 3 
Electives, by advisement 6 

2]_ 

Total 39 

Students with no prior supervised working experience in geron- 
tology are strongly advised to undertake a field work practicum. 



Humanities 



Director: Ralf E. Carriuolo, Professor of Music, Chairman, 
Department of Humanities, Ph.D., Wesley an University 

Coordinator: John CoUinson, Professor of Philosophy, Ph.D., 
The Johns Hopkins University 

The program leading to a Master of Arts degree in humanities will 
assist the student to develop an understanding of the range and ca- 
pacity of social, practical, and artistic creativity; an appreciation of the 
cultural achievements of our past; and an increased sensitivity to the 
continuous intertwining of past achievement, present activity and 
future aspirations - the constituents of any human culture. 

The curriculum is interdisciplinary, designed for the adult seeking 
intellectual challenge. Colloguia are conducted by two faculty 
members from different academic areas, and are concerned with an 



69 



Academic Programs 



historical period or a seminal idea. Seminars are given by a single in- 
structor and are more particular in locus. Independent study enables 
students to pursue their own interests. All courses are conducted as 
part of a continuing dialogue between students and faculty, stressing 
the relevance of our cultural tradition to the problems and issues of 
contemporary American life. 

Althiough the orientation of the program is toward Western 
thought, opportunity to pursue threads of investigation into other 
cultures is available and is encouraged. 



Requirements for the degree 
Master of Arts in IHumanities 

Each student must accumulate 45 hours of credit including the 
writing of a thesis. Transfer credit will be given where appropriate. The 
program should include at least seven colloguia and at least four 
seminars. It must include HU 606, Humanism and Its Methodology. 



Industrial Engineering 



Coordinator: William S. Gere Jr., Associate Professor of Industrial 
Engineering, Ph.D., Carnegie-Mellon University 

The Master of Science in industrial engineering is considered a 
fifth-year or a professional degree, and is designed to provide a broad 
background in operations research, man -machine systems, and human 
factor analysis to students with undergraduate engineering or technical 
degrees from ECPD accredited schools. 



Requirements for the degree 

IVIaster of Science in industrial engineering 

The basic program consists of 48 credit hours. The transfer of 
credit from other institutions will be permitted subject to the Graduate 
School policy on transfer credit detailed elsewhere in this bulletin. Re- 
guired courses may be waived on the basis of undergraduate courses 
taken at accredited institutions. All waivers must be approved in writ- 
ing by the Department of Industrial Engineering, and are conditional 



70 



Industrial Engineering 



upon subsequent academic performance. In some cases, the program 
coordinator may permit substitution of relevant courses in place of the 
required courses. 

SEMINAR PROJECT 

The program requires all students to complete IE 690, Seminar 
Project. This requirement is met by the preparation of a relevant 
seminar project report, prepared under the direction of a faculty ad- 
viser. The complete and final manuscript must be submitted to the proj- 
ect adviser prior to the end of the tenth week of the term in which the 
candidate expects to complete the requirements for the degree. For 
further specifications see Research Project, Seminar Projects and In- 
dependent Study requirements detailed elsewhere in this bulletin. It is 
suggested that a student begin work on the seminar project after hav- 
ing completed at least 15 credit hours. 

In certain cases, students who routinely complete projects similar 
to the required Seminar Project as a part of their professional duties 
may petition to satisfy the Seminar Project requirement by taking two 
advanced industrial engineering electives in place of the project. Such 
a substitution must have the prior written approval of the program 
coordinator. 



Program of study 

REQUIRED COURSES 

Course number and title Credit 

IE 60 1 Introduction to Operations Research/ 

Management Science 3 

IE 607 Probability Theory 3 

IE 603 F Introduction to Digital Computers (FORTRAN) ... 3 
EC 604 Macroeconomic Analysis, or 

EC 603 Microeconomic Analysis 3 

IE 65 1 Human Engineering I 3 

IE 602 Quality Analysis 3 

EC 625 Industrial Relations 3 

P 619 Organizational Behavior, or 

P 620 Industrial Psychology 3 

IE 690 Seminar Project 3 

Electives (IE or Math Courses) 9 

Electives 12 

48 



71 



Academic Programs 



Industrial Relations 



Coordinator: Robert J. Dworak, Professor of Public 
Administration, D.P.A., University of Southern California 

Industrial relations, as a social and behavioral science discipline, is 
the field of study concerned with all aspects, both macro and micro, of 
the employment relationship. As an applied organizational and societal 
function, industrial relations is the profession concerned with the 
management of the aggregate manpower resources available for, or 
engaged in, the employment relationship. 

As both an academic discipline and a profession, industrial rela- 
tions is an interdisciplinary problem -solving field which attempts to 
resolve conflicts among four major parties to the employment relation- 
ship - employers, employees, unions and government. 

The field of industrial relations has been growing rapidly and is 
becoming increasingly important for the effective functioning of almost 
all kinds of organizations. More and more companies and institutions 
have created activities requiring the services of personnel conversant 
with the large body of tools and knowledge which has been generated 
in the field in the past two decades. 

The program will aim to present the knowledge and the skill 
needed to provide employment opportunities in various kinds of 
organizations in the fields of employee procurement, development, 
wage and salary administration, employee services and benefits, 
safety, labor-management relations, job and organization structuring, 
labor economics, supervision and manpower planning. The program 
will also establish the foundation for advanced study and research. 

The interdisciplinary orientation of the MS in industrial relations 
program is emphasized in the required courses which are drawn from 
economics, management and psychology. It will be further supported 
in the program's concentration electives which will be drawn from 
economics, industrial engineering, management, political science, 
psychology, public administration and quantitative analysis. 

ADMISSION POLICY 

Admission is open to persons holding a baccalaureate degree 
from an accredited institution of higher education. The undergraduate 
degree should preferably, but not exclusively, be in the social and 
behavioral science (i.e., economics, history, political science, psychol- 
ogy, or sociology), business administration or public administration. 
Admission is also open to full-time employed professionals in personnel 
and industnal relations holding a baccalaureate degree in any field 
from an accredited institution. 

Though admission decisions are based primarily on an applicant's 
undergraduate record, the promise of academic success is the essential 



72 



Industrial Relations 



factor for admission. Any applicant may be required to complete 
selected undergraduate courses with a grade of B or better as a condi- 
tion of admission. Before matriculating a student may be required to 
submit scores from either the Graduate Management Admissions Test 
(GMAT), the Graduate Record Examination (GRE), or the Miller 
Analogies Test. To demonstrate that they have acceptable communica- 
tion skills, persons may be required to submit a writing sample and to 
have a personal interview with the industrial relations program coor- 
dinator. Finally, applicants are expected to possess personal attributes 
which will support success in the personal and industrial relations pro- 
fession. 



Requirements for the degree 

Master of Science in industrial relations 

A minimum total of 39 graduate credit hours is required for the 
Master of Science degree in industrial relations. Of these 39 graduate 
credit hours, 2 1 graduate credit hours are in approved industrial rela- 
tions elective courses. Prior to registering for elective courses, the stu- 
dent must secure written approval of the industrial relations program 
coordinator. 

Candidates for the MS in industrial relations should be familiar 
with the use of statistics in solving problems and decision making. 
Knowledge of statistics is assumed in the advanced courses in the in- 
dustrial relations program. For students without this background, this 
prerequisite may be met by taking a course in probability and statistics 
as a prerequisite. 



Program of study 

REQUIRED COURSES 

Course n umber and title Credit 

MG 637 Management 3 

P 619 Organizational Behavior 3 

EC 625 Industrial Relations 3 

EC 627 Economics of Labor Relations 3 

EC 687 Collective Bargaining 3 

MG 678 Personnel Management Seminar 3 

MG 679 Industrial Relations Seminar 3 

IR core course credits 21 

IR approved electives 18 

Total credits for degree 39 



73 



Academic Programs 



Mechanical Engineering 



Coordinator: Richard J. Greet, Associate Professor of Mechanical 
Engineering, Ph.D., Harvard University 

This program is intended to meet the needs of professionally 
employed engineers and scientists for academic work beyond the bac- 
calaureate level. It has been designed to increase competence in 
modem analysis and synthesis technigues as they apply to engineering 
design. 

The program centers on a core seguence which all students are 
expected to take. The core courses contain advanced methods of 
analysis and design which are of common interest in engineering work. 
Students complete the program by electing a series of courses in 
mechanical engineering which is particularly suited to their current 
professional interests. Early in the program, students, with the approval 
of their advisers, prepare a detailed plan insuring an overall educa- 
tional experience that is integrated and logical. 

All decisions regarding both core and elective reguirements are 
subject to final approval of the student's adviser. 



Requirements for the degree 

Master of Science in mechanical engineering 

A minimum of 39 credits must be completed to earn the Master of 
Science degree in mechanical engineering. The transfer credit from 
other institutions will be permitted subject to the Graduate School 
policy on transfer credit. Thesis topics should be approved by the 
faculty adviser when the student has completed 18-21 graduate 
credits. Thesis preparation and submission must comply with Graduate 
School policy on thesis with the final manuscript submitted to the ad- 
viser prior to the end of the tenth week of the term in which the can- 
didate expects to complete the reguirements for the degree. 



Program of study 

REQUIRED COURSES 

Course number and title Credit 

M 624 Applied Mathematics 3 

ME 602 Boundary Value Problems 3 

ME 603 Approximation Methods 3 



74 



ME 


604 


M 


620 


ME 


615 


ME 


625 


ME 


630 


ME 


698-699 



Mechanical Engineering/Opierations Research 



Numerical Methods, or 

Numerical Analysis 3 

Theory of Elasticity 3 

Mechanics of Continua 3 

Advanced Fluid Mechanics ■ . . . 3 

Thesis 6 

Electives 12 



39 



ELECTIVE COURSES 

Course number and title Credit 

ME 610 Advanced Dynamics 3 

ME 6 1 1 System Vibrations -3 

ME 620 Classical Thermodynamics 3 

ME 622 Statistical Thermodynamics 3 

ME 627 Plasticity , 3 

ME 628 Modern Materials 3 

ME 632 Advanced Heat Transfer 3 

ME 635 Advanced Turbomachinery 3 

ME 640 Combustion 3 

ME 645 Computational Fluid Dynamics and Heat Transfer . .3 

ME 660 Advanced Design Philosophies 3 

ME 670 Special Topics - Mechanical Engineering 3 

ME 695 Independent Study I 3 



Operations Research 



Coordinator: William S. Gere Jr., Associate Professor of Industrial 
Engineering, Ph.D., Carnegie -Mellon University 

The Master of Science in operations research curriculum provides 
thorough coverage of the theory, methodology and application of the 
techniques of op^erations research and systems analysis. The program 
is designed to prepare qualified applicants from diverse backgrounds 
to deal with major social, industrial and business problems. 



75 



Academic Programs 



Requirements for the degree 

Master of Science in operations research 

The basic program consists of 48 credit hours. The transfer of 
credit from other institutions will be permitted subject to the Graduate 
School policy on transfer credit detailed elsewhere in this bulletin. Re- 
quired courses may be waived on the basis of undergraduate courses 
taken at accredited institutions. All waivers must be approved in 
writing by the Department of Industrial Engineering, and are con- 
tingent upon subsequent academic performance. In some cases, the 
coordinator may permit substitution of relevant courses in place of the 
required courses. 

SEMINAR PROJECT 

The Master of Science in operations research program requires 
all students to complete IE 690, Seminar Project. This requirement is 
met by the preparation of a relevant seminar project report, prepared 
under the direction of a faculty adviser. The complete and final 
manuscript must be submitted to the project adviser prior to the end of 
the tenth week of the term in which the candidate expects to complete 
the requirements for his degree. For further specification see Research 
Projects, Seminar Projects and Independent Study requirements de- 
tailed elsewhere in this bulletin. It is suggested that a student begin 
work on the seminar project after having completed at least 15 credit 
hours. 

In certain cases, students who routinely complete projects similar 
to the required Seminar Project as a part of their professional duties 
may petition to satisfy the Seminar Project requirement by taking two 
advanced industrial engineering electives in place of the project. Such 
a substitution must have the prior written approval of the program 
coordinator. 



Program of study 

REQUIRED COURSES 

Course number and title Credit 

IE 601 Introduction to Operations Research/ 

Management Science 3 

IE 603 F Introduction to Digital Computers (FORTRAN) ... 3 

IE 607 Probability Theory 3 

M 610 Fundamentals of Calculus and Linear Algebra .... 3 

EC 604 Macroeconomic Analysis, or 

EC 603 Microeconomic Analysis 3 

IE 62 1 Linear Programming 3 



76 



IE 


622 


IE 


685 


IE 


686 


IE 


688 


IE 


690 



Organizational/Industrial Psychology 



Queuing Theory 3 

Theory of Optimization 3 

Inventory Analysis 3 

Design of Experiments 3 

Seminar Project 3 

Electives (I.E., Math, or E.E.) 6 

Electives _9 

48 



Organizational/Industrial 
Psychology 

Coordinator: Dennis Courtney, Associate Professor of Psychology, 
Ph.D., Ohio State University 

The Master of Arts in organizational/industrial psychology is 
designed as an interdisciplinary program leading to the development 
of expertise in the application of psychology for men and women in- 
volved in supervisory roles and for those planning such professional 
careers. The program emphasizes both the principles and procedures 
of psychology and the perspectives of other disciplines in preparing 
the student to meet organizational problems in their full complexity. 
Approximately two dozen top industrialists have agreed to assist the 
department in the continuing development of the program. 

The program further strives to: 

1 . familiarize the student with contemporary research and publica- 
tions concerned with mutual relationships between organizational 
characteristics and the employee's behavior; 

2. provide the student with an improved understanding of psycho- 
logical findings relating to personnel counseling, test administra- 
tion and interpretation for selection, transfer, and promotion as 
well as management development; 

3. enhance the student's knowledge of current psychological infor- 
mation and skills relating to human -need satisfaction, executive 
training, organizational climate, problem solving and decision 
making, effective organizational change, and the study of organ- 
izationally induced stress; 

4. familiarize the student with current psychological theory and 
findings relating to attitude measurement, personnel policy evalu- 
ation and development and management development programs; 

5. meet the increasing needs of organizations for individuals with 
specialized research and human relations skills; and 

6. provide graduate study on a late afternoon and early evening 
basis for the full-time employee. 



77 



Academic Programs 



ADMISSION POLICY 

Applicants are expected to possess social and interpersonal 
characteristics which will support success in organizational settings. 

Students who give evidence of a mature interest in the application 
of psychological principles to organizational problems and who hold 
an undergraduate degree from an accredited college or university are 
eligible for admission. 

Applicants are reguired to complete a guestionnaire and submit it 
directly to the Graduate School and may be reguired to submit scores 
from either the Miller Analogies Test or the Graduate Record Examina- 
tion Aptitude Test. An undergraduate major in psychology is not 
specifically reguired as a basis for consideration. However, all students 
are expected to have at least an introductory level understanding of 
psychological concepts, principles, and methods before taking courses 
in the Master of Arts in organizational /industrial psychology program. 



Requirements for the degree 

Master of Arts in organizational/industrial 

psychology 

A total of 39 credit hours is reguired of candidates for the degree 
of Master of Arts in organizational/industrial psychology. Candidates 
for this degree will be required to complete 18 credit hours of required 
courses in the core curriculum. Another 21 credit hours of electives 
will be chosen after consultation with the department chairman, or a 
representative, in light of the student's academic and professional 
goals. The student may not complete more than 9 credit hours of elec- 
tives until he/she has satisfied the core requirements. Up to 9 credit 
hours of electives may be taken in other departments, such as industrial 
engineering, economics, management, marketing, public administra- 
tion or criminal justice. 

TRANSFER CREDIT 

The transfer of credit from other institutions will be permitted sub- 
ject to the Graduate School policy on transfer of credit detailed 
elsewhere in this bulletin. 

THESIS 

Students electing to write a thesis must register for P 698, Thesis I, 
and P 699, Thesis II. The thesis must show ability to organize materials 
in a clear and original manner and present well -reasoned conclusions. 



78 



Organizational /Industrial Psychology 



The thesis is written under the direction of the faculty member in 
charge of the thesis seminar or a faculty member with special com- 
petence in the subject matter of the thesis. The complete and final 
manuscript must be submitted to the thesis adviser prior to the end of 
the tenth week of the term in which the candidate expects to complete 
the requirements for the degree. Thesis preparation and submission 
must comply with the Graduate School policy on Thesis /Seminar Pro- 
ject Requirements detailed elsewhere in this bulletin. 

PROGRAM OPTIONS 

In response to the different needs and levels of preparation of 
students in the program, the four following options are available: 

Option 1 is recommended for an individual currently employed 
in a managerial or supervisory position. The practicum seminars 
will allow the student to investigate a specific job -related problem 
under expert faculty supervision. 

Option 2 affords the student with limited work experience an 
opportunity to serve an industrial internship, providing the student 
the chance to observe real organizational/industrial situations to 
be analyzed and discussed with a faculty supervisor. 

Option 3 will provide the student planning to pursue doctoral 
studies with an essential tool - the ability to do empirical research 
and report writing through the preparation of a ^esis. 

Option 4 consists of elective courses selected under faculty ad- 
visement. The choice of electives is intended to provide the student 
with a broad interdisciplinary background, complementing the 
student's own academic training and interest. 

Normally the student should not begin work on any of the first 
three options until he/she has completed at least four core courses. 



Program of study 

REQUIRED COURSES 

Course number and title Credit 

EC 625 Industrial Relations 3 

P 609 Research Methods 3 

P 619 Organizational Behavior 3 

P 635 Assessment of Human Performance with 

Standardized Tests 3 

P 640 Industrial Motivation and Morale 3 

P 645 Seminar in Organizational /Industrial Psychology . . 3 

Elective options (see below) * 21 

39 

79 



Academic Programs 



ELECTIVE OPTIONS 

Option 1 

P 678 Practicum I 3 

P 679 Practicum II 3 

Electives* 15 

21 
Option 2 

P 693 Organizational Internship I 3 

P 694 Organizational Internship II 3 

Electives* 15 

21 
Option 3 

P 698 Thesis I 3 

P 699 Thesis II 3 

Electives* 15 

21 
Option 4 

Electives * 21 

*The choice of electives is made in consultation with a departmental 
adviser in light of the student's academic and professional goals. 



Public Administration 



Coordinator: Kenneth Fox, Assistant Professor of Public 
Administration, Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 

The general purpose of the Master of Public Administration 
degree at the University of New Haven is the training of men and 
women at the graduate level for public service careers. Specifically, 
the program strives to: 

1 . equip students with modern analytical and quantitative tools of 
decision making and their application to complex problems of 
government; 

2. expose students to the wide range of administrative and mana- 
gerial problems and responsibilities of government; and 

3. increase the student's knowledge and skills in the particular man- 
agement functions of budgeting, planning, public policy formula- 
tion, public finance and public personnel administration. 



80 



Public Administration 



Requirements for the degree 
Master of Public Administration 

Forty -five graduate credit hours are required of candidates for 
this degree. Of the 15 credit hours of electives in the M.P.A. program, 
six credit hours may be taken in graduate courses offered in other pro- 
grams such as psychology, criminal justice, economics, and industrial 
engineering. 



Program of study 

REQUIRED COURSES 

Course number and title Credit 

PA 60 1 Principles of Public Administration 3 

PA 602 Public Policy Formulation and Implementation .... 3 " 

PA 604 Seminar in Communities and Social Change 3 

EC 608 Economics for Public Administrators 3 

PA 6 1 1 Research Methods in Public Administration 3 

PA 625 Administrative Behavior 3 

PA 620 Personnel Administration and Collective . 

Bargaining in the Public Sector 3 

PA 632 Public Finance and Budgeting 3 

PA 690 Research Project 3 

PA 693 Public Administration Internship 3 

Electives 15 



45 



CONCENTRATIONS 



Concentrations in the Master of Public Administration program 
are designed to provide career-oriented structure for students with 
well-formed career interests. The concentration in health care manage- 
ment is the first concentration introduced into the program. The 
department expects to develop additional concentrations over the next 
several years. 

Health care management 

Adviser: John R. Coleman, Associate Professor of Public 
Administration, Ph.D., University of Massachusetts 

Students following the health care concentration will take the core 
curriculum of ten courses and follow the health care concentration of 
five courses for their five elective courses. 



81 



Academic Programs 



PS 635 Law and Public Health 

MG 640 Health Care Management 

PA 641 Institutional Budgeting 

PA 643 Health and Institutional Planning 

and one course chosen from among the following: 

PA 642 Health Care Delivery Systems 

PA 644 Administration of Programs and Services 

for the Aged 
PA 645 Health Care Economics and Finance 



Senior Professional Certificates 



This program is limited to those already holding an advanced 
degree who want additional graduate study in a coherent program, 
but do not want to work toward another advanced degree. 

Since the Senior Professional Certificate is not a degree, a student 
may transfer credits earned for a certificate into a master's program at 
any time, subject to the requirements of the master's degree and the 
decision of the coordinator of the master's program, and to acceptance 
in the master's program. 

Students completing work in a certificate program do not attend 
commencement but will receive a certificate. A petition for certification 
must be filed with the graduate registrar and the appropriate fee paid. 
When the course work is reviewed and found complete the certificate 
will be mailed to the student. 



Requirements for the certificate 

The program consists of 1 5 or 18 credits, depending upon the 
area chosen. Students, having chosen their area of study, should con- 
tact the adviser who is listed for that particular area. 



Programs of study 

Ten different certificates are offered. Three certificate programs 
allow options to choose a particular speciality. The programs are the 

following: 



82 



Senior Professional Certificates 



Accounting and Taxation 

I: Financial Accounting 

II: Managerial Accounting 

III: Taxation 
Applications of Psychology- 
Computer Applications and Information Systems 
Economic Forecasting 
Finance 

General Management 
International Business 
Marketing 

I: Marketing 

II: Quantitative Technigues in Marketing 
Public Management 

I: Survey of the Field 

II: Urban and Regional Planning and 
Management 

III: Public Personnel Management 
Quantitative Analysis 

Accounting and Taxation 

Adviser: Jeffrey L. Williams, Associate Professor of Accounting, 
C.P.A., CM. A., M.B.A., University of Bndgeport 

Option I: 

Financial Accounting 

A 650 Advanced Accounting Theory 3 

A 654 Financial Statements: Reporting and Analysis .... 3 

and any three from the following: 

A 65 1 Financial Accounting Seminar 3 

A 652 Advanced Auditing 3 

A 653 Accounting for the Not-for-Profit Organization .... 3 

A 656 International Accounting 3 



15 



Option II: 

Managerial Accounting 

A 621 Managerial Accounting - 3 

A 650 Advanced Accounting Theory 3 

and any three from the following: 

A 641 Accounting Information Systems • 3 

A 642 Operational Auditing 3 

A 66 1 Managerial Accounting Seminar 3 

FI 615 Finance 3 



83 



15 



Academic Programs 



Option III: 
Taxation 

A 60 1 Federal Income Taxation I 3 

A 602 Federal Income Taxation II 3 

A 604 Corporate Income Taxation I 3 

A 605 Corporate Income Taxation II 3 

and any taxation elective 1 5 

Applications of Psychology 

Adviser: Dennis Courtney, Associate Professor of Psychology, 
Ph.D., Ohio State 

Students are expected to plan a sequence of courses with the 
faculty adviser at the start of the program. Five courses will be selected 
depending upon a student's interests, career objectives and academic 
preparation; courses are usually limited to the following: 

P 610 Program Evaluation in Community Psychology ... 3 

P 621 Behavior Modification 3 

P 623 Psychology of the Small Group 3 

P 627 Attitude and Opinion Measurement 3 

P 628 The Interview 3 

P 629 Introduction to Counseling 3 

P 630 Psychology of Personality 3 

P 63 1 Social Psychology 3 

P 632 Group Dynamics and Group Treatment 3 

P 633 Problems of Drug Abuse 3 

P 634 Personality Assessment 3 

P 636 Abnormal Psychology . 3 

P 638 Psychology of Communication and 

Opinion Change 3 

P 642 Organizational Change and Development 3 

P 650 Ecological Psychology 3 

Total of 15 

Computer Applications and Information Systems 

Adviser: William S. Gere Jr., Associate Professor of Industrial 
Engineering, Ph.D., Carnegie -Mellon University 

Management Systems 3 

Advanced Business Programming 3 

Computer Systems Selection 3 

Data Information Systems 3 

Multiprogramming Systems 3 

15 



84 



IE 


604 


IE 


605 


IE 


610 


IE 


614 


IE 


684 



Senior Professional Certificates 



Economic Forecasting 

Adviser: John Teluk, Associate Professor of Economics, M.A., 
Free University, Munich 

EC 604 Macroeconomic Analysis 3 

EC 635 Comparative Economic Systems 3 

EC 645 Seminar in Macroeconomic Policy 3 

EC 653 Econometrics 3 

OA 607 Forecasting 3 

15 

Finance 

Adviser: Jeffrey L. Williams 

FI 615 Finance 3 

FI 617 Financial Institutions and Capital Markets 3 

Fl 645 Corporate Financial Theory 3 

FI 65 1 Portfolio Management and Capital Market 

Analysis 3 

and any two from the following: 

A 654 Financial Statements: Reporting and Analysis .... 3 

FI 619 Monetary and Central Banking Policy 3 

FI 649 Security Analysis 3 

FI 661 Real Estate: Principles and Practices . 3 

18 

General Management 

Adviser: William S. Y. Pan, Assistant Professor of Management 
Science, Ph.D., Columbia University 

any six from the following: 

MG 660 Comparative Management 3 

MG 66 1 Development of Management Thought 3 

MG 662 Organization Theory 3 

MG 663 Leadership in Organizations 3 

MG 664 Organizational Effectiveness 3 

MG 669 Business Policy and Strategy 3 

MG 680 Current Topics in Business Administration 3 

MG 692 Readings in Management 3 

18 



85 



Academic Programs 



International Business 

Adviser: Kevin F. McCrohan, Associate Professor of Marketing, 
Ph.D., City University of New York 

IB 643 International Business Operations 3 

and any four from the following 

EC 620 Economic History of Western Europe 3 

EC 660 Economic Development of Japan 3 

IB 644 Import and Export Business 3 

IB 645 Structure of World Markets 3 

IB 65 1 Comparative Marketing 3 

IB 652 Multinational Business Operations 3 

MG 660 Comparative Management 3 

PS 603 International Law 3 

15 
Marketing 

Adviser: Kevin F. McCrohan 

Option I: 
Marketing 

MK 609 Marketing 3 

and any four from the following: 

IB 643 International Business Operations 3 

IB 644 Import and Export Business 3 

IB 651 Comparative Marketing 3 

MK 6 1 6 Analysis of Buyer Behavior 3 

MK 639 Marketing Research and Information Systems .... 3 

MK 64 1 Marketing Management 3 

MK 643 Product Management 3 

MK 644 Consumerism 3 

MK 645 Distribution Strategy 3 

MK 680 Marketing Workshop _3 

15 
Option II: 
Quantitative Techniques in Marketing 

IE 603 F Introduction to Digital Computers: FORTRAN 3 

OA 604 Probability & Statistics 3 

and any three from the following: 

IE 615 Transportation and Distribution 3 

MK 639 Marketing Research and Information Systems .... 3 

MK 64 1 Marketing Management 3 

OA 607 Forecasting 3 

15 



86 



Senior Professional Certificates 



Public Management 

Adviser: Kenneth Fox Jr., Assistant Professor of Public 
Administration, Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 

Option I: 

Survey of the Field 

any five from the following: 

EC 665 Urban and Regional Economic Development 3 

PA 608 The Legislative Process 3 

PA 61 1 Research Methods in Public Administration 3 

PA 620 Personnel Administration and Collective 

Bargaining in the Public Sector 3 

PA 625 Administrative Behavior 3 

PA 630 Governmental Accounting 3 

PA 632 Public Finance and Budgeting 3 

PA 660 Urban Planning: Theory and Practice 3 

PA 662 Environmental Design 3 

15 

Option II: 

Urban and Regional Planning and Management 

EC 665 Urban and Regional Economic Development 3 

PA 630 Governmental Accounting 3 

PA 660 Urban Planning: Theory and Practice 3 

PA 662 Environmental Design 3 

PS 616 Urban Government and Politics 3 



Option III: 

Public Personnel Management 

EC 625 Industrial Relations 3 

EC 69 1 Labor Legislation 3 

PA 620 Personnel Administration and Collective 

Bargaining in the Public Sector 3 

PA 625 Administrative Behavior 3 

and one from the following: 

P 634 Personality Assessment 3 

P 635 Assessment of Human Performance with 

Standardized Tests 3 



15 



15 



87 



Academic Programs 

Quantitative Analysis 

Adviser: William S. Y. Pan 

IE 604 Management Systems 3 

OA 604 Probability and Statistics 3 

OA 605 Advanced Statistics 3 

OA 606 Advanced Management Science 3 

OA 607 Forecasting 3 



15 



Taxation 



Coordinator: Jeffrey L. Williams, Associate Professor of Accounting, 
M.B.A., University of Bridgeport, C.P.A., CM. A. 

Society's decision to pursue collectively, through the instrument 
of governmental policy, a variety of economic and social goals has led 
to the development of a complex body of "tax law." Given the 
dynamic state of society's economic and social goals, and the alter- 
native means for their accomplishment, the body of "tax law" char- 
acteristically exists in a continual state of change. 

The complex and dynamic structure of "tax law" is significant not 
only because of its impact upon the process of accomplishing society's 
goals but also because of its influence upon the economic decision- 
making process in which society's members are constantly engaged. 
The tax consequences at the applicable governmental level - federal, 
state, and local - of eponomic decisions made by society's members 
have been and will continue to be an increasingly important con- 
sideration. 



PROGRAM OBJECTIVES 

In recognition of the above, a need to prepare technically compe- 
tent individuals for careers in the field of taxation has developed. Ow- 
ing to the complex and dynamic nature of "tax law," it appears ap- 
propriate to conduct this preparation at an advanced level of inquiry 
with an emphasis upon examining the issues of current interest in taxa- 
tion. Accordingly, the Master of Science program in taxation has been 
designed as a framework to accomplish the following structure of ob- 
jectives: 

1 . To apprise the students of the role of "tax law" relative to social 
and economic policy. 



Taxation 



2. To prepare students with approaches relative to the integration of 
"tax law" with the economic decision -making process. 

3. To prepare the students for technical competence relative to 
understanding and interpreting "tax law." 

4. To prepare students with approaches to independent research in 
taxation. 

5. To familiarize students with Internal Revenue procedures. 
Given the above objectives, the Master of Science program in 

taxation provides a framework through which advanced and timely 
tax training can be acquired by experienced professionals (accoun- 
tants and attorneys) practicing in the field of taxation, as well as in- 
dividuals seeking to prepare themselves for entry into career positions 
in taxation. 

ADMISSION POLICY 

Admission to matriculation in the program is available to CPA's, 
attorneys, and persons holding an undergraduate degree from an ac- 
credited institution, preferably, but not exclusively, in accounting or in 
business administration with a major in accounting. Persons holding 
other than the above degrees will be required to take a number of 
selected undergraduate courses as a condition for admission. Admis- 
sion is based primarily on an applicant's undergraduate record; 
however, the promise of academic success is the essential factor for ad- 
mission. In support of their application, persons may submit their 
scores from the Graduate Management Admissions Test (GMAT). An 
applicant may be required to take this test. 



Requirements for the degree 
Master of Science in taxation 

A minimum total of 36 credits is required for the Master of 
Science in taxation. The 36 credits will include 24 credits from re- 
quired corg courses and 12 credits from electives. The transfer of 
credit from other institutions will be permitted subject to the Graduate 
School policy on transfer credit detailed elsewhere in this bulletin. 



Program of study 

REQUIRED COURSES 

Course n umber and title Credit 

A 60 1 Federal Income Taxation I 3 

A 602 Federal Income Taxation II 3 

A 604 Corporate Income Taxation I 3 



89 



Academic Programs 



A 605 Corporate Income Taxation II 3 

A 607 Tax Accounting 3 

A 608 Estate and Gift Taxation 3 

A 614 Federal Tax Practice and Procedure 3 

A 615 Research Project in Federal Income Taxation 3 



ELECTIVE COURSES 



24 



A 603 Federal Income Taxation III 3 

A 606 Corporate Income Taxation III 3 

A 609 State and Local Taxation 3 

A 610 Consolidated Returns 3 

A 611 Income Taxation of Estates and Trusts 3 

A 612 International Taxation 3 

A 613 Taxation of Partnerships and Partners 3 

Four electives totalling 12 

Total for degree 36 



90 



91 




/ 










COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

Unless otherwise indicated, all graduate courses carry three credit hours. 

Department of Accounting 

A 600 Accounting No Credit 

The principles and procedures underlying the generation of financial 
accounting information. 

A 601 Federal Income Taxation I 

An introduction to tax policy and the basic principles of the federal in- 
come tax law. Coverage entails the key concepts of gross income, adjusted 
gross income, deductions, exemptions and credits, with special attention given 
to the provisions of the Internal Revenue Code affecting individual taxpayers. 

A 602 Federal Income Taxation II 

Prerequisite: A 601 . A continuation of Federal Income Taxation I em- 
phasizing the basic provisions concerning dispositions of property: analysis of 
basis, recognition of gain or loss, capital asset transactions and nonrecognition 
exchanges. Coverage extended to assignment of income theories, tax minimiza- 
tion and maxitax and deferred payment sales. 

A 603 Federal Income Taxation III 

Prerequisite: A 602. Advanced concepts of federal income taxation. 
Further study of capital gains and losses including stock options, mortgages, 
bootstrap sales, sale of patent rights and know-how, sale of copyrights and tax 
shelter and deferral techniques. Principles of income in respect of a decedent 
are also introduced. 



93 



Course Descriptions 



A 604 Corporate Income Taxation I 

Prerequisite; A 602. A foundation course analyzing the basic federal 
income provisions affecting corporations and shareholders. Course coverage 
includes organization of the corporation, corporate capital structure, corporate 
distributions, stock redemptions, bail-out techniques and liquidations. 

A 605 Corporate Income Taxation II 

Prerequisite; A 604. A detailed analysis of the federal income tax rules 
covering corporate reorganizations and divisions. Also discussed are some of 
the nontax aspects of corporate reorganizations such as S.E.C., anti-trust, and 
business reasons for choice of particular method. 

A 606 Corporate Income Taxation III 

Prerequisite; A 605. Advanced study in the corporate tax area includ- 
ing subchapter S corporations, collapsible corporations, accumulated earnings 
tax, affiliated corporations and carryover of corporate tax attributes. 

A 607 Tax Accounting 

Prerequisite; A 601 . Investigation of such areas as: problems of alloca- 
ting income and deductions to the proper tax year, permissible tax accounting 
methods, depreciation, inventory methods, net operating losses, installment 
reporting, change in accounting method and comparison of business and tax 
accounting principles. 

A 608 Estate and Gift Taxation 

A comprehensive introduction to, and analysis of, the federal estate 
and gift tax laws including basic principles of estate planning. Procedures for 
preparation of the estate and gift tax returns are treated. Brief coverage is also 
given to state death and inheritance taxes. 

A 609 State and Local Taxation 

The tax problems encountered at the state and local level by businesses 
engaged in interstate commerce. Federal limitations on the taxation of multi- 
state enterprises and jurisdictional problems are examined. Specific areas 
covered are; license to do business, net income, franchise, gross receipts, 
property, and sales and use taxes. Apportionment problems are examined 
in detail. 

A 610 Consolidated Returns 

Prerequisite; A 604. A thorough analysis of the federal consolidated 
tax return provisions including eligibility and whether to file a consolidated 
taxable income; intercompany transactions and deferral concepts; basis in the 
disposition of stock of a subsidiary; computation of earnings and profits; and 
mechanics of preparing the consolidated return. 

A 61 1 Income Taxation of Estates and Trusts 

Prerequisite; A 602. Federal income taxation of estates, trusts, grant- 
ors, and beneficiaries. Topics are simple and complex trusts, throwback rules, 
taxable and distributable net income, assignment of income concepts and 
income in respect of a decedent, preparation of the estate and trust returns. 

A 612 International Taxation 

Prerequisite; A 604. Consideration of the federal income tax treat- 



94 



Accounting 



ment of nonresident aliens and foreign corporations and the foreign income of 
U.S. residents and domestic corporations; comparison of alternative methods 
of engaging in operations abroad; foreign tax credit; allocations under code 
Section 482; Section 367 rulings; and the effect of tax treaties. 

A 6 1 3 Taxation of Partnerships and Partners 

Prereguisite: A 602. A study of the federal income tax problems 
encountered in the formation and operation of a partiiership, including com- 
putations of taxable income, sale of a partnership interest, withdrawal of a 
partner, death or retirement of a partner, and distribution of partnership assets. 
Limited partnerships are also covered. Procedure for preparation of the part- 
nership return. 

A 614 Federal Tax Practice and Procedure 

Prerequisite: A 601 . A study of the history and organization of the In- 
ternal Revenue Service, the selection of returns for audit and the review steps at 
the administration level. Code provisions covered will include; filing require- 
ments, statutory notices, restriction on assessment, statute of limitations, refund 
procedures, waivers, closing agreements, protests and rulings. 

A 615 Research Project in Federal Income Taxation 

Prerequisite: 1 5 graduate hours. This course is devoted to a study of 
the techniques and tools of tax research. Reference sources stijdies include tax 
looseleaf services, I.R.S. Cumulative Bulletin, court cases, Congressional 
Bulletin, court cases. Congressional committee reports, textbooks, published 
articles. A significant research paper devoted to a subject of topical interest is 
required. 

A 62 1 Managerial Accounting 

Prerequisite: A 600 or 6 more credits in accounting. Accounting 
analysis for the managerial functions of planning, controlling and evaluating the 
performance of the business tirm. 

A 641 Accounting Information Systems 

Prerequisite: A 62 1 . An examination of the function and limitations of 
internal accounting information systems and their relationship to other decision- 
oriented business information systems. 

A 642 Operational Auditing 

Prerequisite: A 62 1 . An analysis of the principles underlying and the 
procedures applying the function of auditing the results of tirm -related business 
decisions. 

A 650 Advanced Accounting Theory 

Prerequisite: 6 hrs. of intermediate accounting. Considers the theoret- 
ical aspects of accepted accounting principles and their significance as a frame 
of reference for the evaluation of accounting practices. Considerable attention 
is focused on the role of regulatory agencies and professional accounting or- 
ganizations with regard to their influences upon accounting theory and practice. 

A 65 1 Financial Accounting Seminar 

Prerequisite: A 650. An examination and evaluation of current liter- 
ature in external accounting issues and related fields. 



95 



Course Descriptions 



A 652 Advanced Auditing 

Prerequisite: 3 hours of auditing. An analysis of the contemporary 
problems surrounding the attest function performed by the professional in- 
dependent auditor. 

A 653 Accounting for the Not -for -Profit Organization 

Prerequisite: 6 hrs. of intermediate accounting. An intensive examina- 
tion of the contemporary views toward financial reporting for the not-for- 
profit organizations. 

A 654 Financial Statements: Reporting and Analysis 

Prerequisite: FI 651. An examination of financial reporting practices 
for financial statement analyses in view of modern theoretical and empirical 
financial decision -making research. 

A 656 International Accounting 

Prerequisite: 6 hrs. of intermediate accounting. An analysis of the 
literature related to the current and growing interest in the development of 
accounting standards for business enterprises throughout the world. 

A 66 1 Managerial Accounting Seminar 

Prerequisite: A 62 1 . An examination and evaluation of current liter- 
ature in internal accounting issues and related fields. 

A 670 Selected Topics 

A study of selected issues of particular interest to the students and in- 
structor. May be taken more than once. 

A 690 Research Project 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours or permission of the instructor. In- 
dependent study under the supervision of an adviser. 

A 695 Independent Study I 

A planned program of individual study under the supervision of a 
member of the faculty. 

A 696 Independent Study II 

Prerequisite: A 695. 

A 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours. Periodic meetings and discussions 
of the individual student's progress in the preparation of a thesis. 

A 699 Thesis II 

Prerequisite: A 698. A continuation of A 698, Thesis I. 



96 



Civil and Environmental Engineering 



Department of Civil and 
Environmental Engineering 

CE 601 Water Treatment 

Advanced design principles and practices in water treatment pro- 
cesses; study of unit processes and operations; water treatment plant design; 
methods of population projection; water distribution systems. 

CE 602 Wastewater Treatment 

Advanced design principles and practices in sewage treatment pro- 
cesses; study of unit processes and operations; secondary sewage treatment 
plant design; sludge handling and disposal; sewage collection systems; intro- 
duction to advanced treatment methods. 

CE 605 Solid Waste Management 

Characteristics, volumes, collection and disposal of solid waste and 
refuse. Design of processing, recycling, and recovery equipment, landfill de- 
sign and operation, resource recovery, incineration. 

CE 606 Environmental Law and Legislation 

Review and techniques of enforcement of state and federal pollution 
control laws and regulations; effects on waste treatment criteria and design and 
evaluation of municipal ordinances; preparation of environmental assessments 
and impact statements. 

CE 612 Advanced Wastewater Treatment 

Prerequisite: CH 601, which may be taken concurrently. Theories 
and principles of advanced sewage treatment including nutrient removal, de- 
mineralization, distillation, ozonation, carbon filtration, ion exchange, nitrifica- 
tion; design of facilities; upgrading secondary plants. 

CE 613 Industrial Wastewater Control 

Prerequisite: CH 601. Characteristics of industrial wastes, volumes, 
sources, types; methods of volume reduction, waste segregation, recovery, 
recycle, and waste treatment. 

CE 614 Water Pollution Control 

Causes and effects of pollution on marine water bodies; stijdy of 
chemical, biological, and physical characteristics and responses; tidal effects; 
survey, sampling and modeling; dredge spoil disposal; estuarine ecology. 

CE 615 Rural and Agricultural Waste Disposal 

Handling and disposal of domestic wastewaters in rural areas; char- 
acteristics and treatment of agricultural wastewaters and waste solids; lagoon- 
ing, composting, soil injection and application. 

CE 616 Ground Water Waste Disposal 

Study of effects of disposal of wastewaters in ground waters; travel of 
pollutants through soil; removal of nub-ients and pollutants by soil interactions; 
leachate identitication and control from refuse disposal areas. 



97 



Course Descriptions 



CE 617 Special Problems in Wastewater Management 

Solutions to problems in sewer infiltration, combined sewers and 
sewer separation; management techniques of sewer systems, user charges and 
capital cost recovery in municipal sewage collection and treatment facilities. 
Preparation of cost effectiveness studies. 

CE 618 Air Pollution Control 

Sources and effects of air pollution, monitoring, sampling and model- 
ing; design of incineration devices and treatment facilities. Enforcement tech- 
niques, complex sources, computer simulation. 

CE 670 Special Topics -Civil Engineering 

A study of related topics of particular interest to students and instruc- 
tor. Course may be taken more than once. 

CE 690 Research Project 

Prerequisite: 18 graduate hours or permission of chairman of the 
Department of Civil Engineering and adviser. Independent study under the 
guidance of an adviser into an area of mutual interest, each study terminating 
in a technical report of academic merit. Research may be in such environ- 
mental areas as water resources, stream pollution, solid waste management 
or air pollution. 

CE 695 Independent Study in Environmental Engineering I 

Prerequisite: permission of program coordinator. Independent study 
under the guidance of an adviser into an area designated by the program 
coordinator. 

CE 696 Independent Study II 

Prerequisite: CE 695. 

CE 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours. Periodic meetings and discussions 
of .the individual student's progress in the preparation of a thesis. 

CE 699 Thesis II 

Prerequisite: CE 698. A continuation of CE 698, Thesis I. 



Department of Chemistry 

CH 601 Environmental Chemistry 

Advanced study of the chemical reactions necessary to understand 
the impact that man's activities have on the environment. Areas considered 
include water and air pollution, power generation, and the release and use of 
industrial organic chemicals. 

CH 611 Special Topics in Advanced Organic Chemistry 

Advanced course dealing with topics such as stereochemistry, pho- 
tochemistry, natural products and mechanisms of organic reactions. 



98 



Chemistry/Criminal Justice 



CH 62 1 Chemical Forensic Analysis with Laboratory (4 credits) 

A course intended to present advanced techniques and new devel- 
opments in the identification of various materials such as pigments, dyestuffs, 
food additives, pharmaceutical preparations, polymers, synthetic fibers, and 
inorganic material products. Laboratory fee required 

CH 63 1 Advanced Instrumentation with Laboratory (4 credits) 

A course intended to provide background for the recent advances 

made in instrumentation and also to provide exposure to some of the techniques 

involved. Laboratory fee required 

CH 670 Selected Topics 

A study of selected issues of particular interest to the students and in- 
structor. May be taken more than once. 

CH 695 Independent Study I 

A planned program of individual study under the supervision of a 
member of the faculty. 

CH 696 Independent Study II 

Prerequisite: CH 695. 

CH 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: Completion of 15 credits of graduate work. Periodic 
meetings and discussion of the individual student's progress in the preparation 
of a thesis. 

CH699 Thesis II 

Prerequisite: CH 698. A continuation of CH 698, Thesis I. 



Division of Criminal Justice 



CJ 601 Seminar in Interpersonal Relations 

Interpersonal communication in teaching, supervision and in various 
work relationships. The criminal justice worker as a resource person and facil- 
itator of others is stressed. Humanistic psychology and interpersonal psychol- 
ogy provide the theoretical base. 

CJ 602 Seminar in Social Control 

An examination of the formal and informal mechanism of controlling 
or conditioning the social behavior of man vis-a-vis the system of social norms, 
laws and institutions. The implication of organizing the system of justice under 
a punishment or rehabilitative ethic will be considered. 

CJ 604 Seminar in Theory and Philosophy of Law 

The theory and philosophy of law and the relationship between law 
and society. Emphasis on the nature of the judicial process, the issues of law 
and personal morality, non victim crimes, and the relationship of enforcement 
agencies to the rules of law. 



99 



Course Descriptions 



CJ 605 Social Deviance 

A survey of theories relating to the scope and nature of the crime 
problem. Consideration of the problems of deviancy, including social norms 
deviancy, mental disturbances, juvenile crime, and the various possible and 
actual responses to deviancy. Various approaches to the problem of rehabili- 
tation. 

CJ 607 Seminar in Criminal Justice Institutions 

The machinery of justice in theory and practice. The rule of law and 
its exceptions in the actual administration of justice. Emphasis on the progressive 
changes m the development of children's and adolescents' courts, probation 
and classification clinics. Crime prevention and reforms of the criminal law. 
Special problems of justice and the poor. Administrative denials of justice, the 
insane offender, the white-collar criminal and social reconstruction through law. 

CJ 608 Law and Evidence 

Comprehensive analysis of the rules of evidence. Topics include ju- 
dicial notice, presumptions, the nature of real and circumstantial evidence, 
hearsay evidence, confessions and admissions and witnesses. Emphasis on 
evidence in criminal cases. 

CJ 609 Criminological Theory 

An analytical review of the multidisciplinary theories of criminal be- 
havior. The impact of various theoretical constructs and concepts on practice 
will be critically evaluated. 

CJ 610 Administration of Justice 

A study of all the steps of the criminal justice system from the time the 
accused is arrested until sentencing to a correctional facility with an objective 
to review all the problems which arise during this process and to consider 
some possible solutions which will benefit the individual being processed with- 
out subverting the purposes of the process. 

CJ 6 1 2 Concepts and Issues in Police Administration 

The development of the theory and practice of police administration 
in the United States. Significant developments and ideas of those who have 
made major contributions to American police administration. 

CJ 6 1 3 Alternatives to Prosecution 

Areas to be covered will be the history, theory and practice of pre- 
trial diversion, as well as the legal, social and administrative problems inherent 
in diversionary approaches. Among the spDecific alternatives to be examined 
will be: youth service bureaus, family courts, citizen dispute settlement, com- 
munity responsibility programs and various pre-trial intervention programs. 

CJ 615 Forensic Science in the Administration of Justice 

The role of natural science in the administration of justice in its broadest 
aspects. Current concepts, present status and future needs of the forensic sci- 
ences. Specific topics in the forensic sciences and their interrelationships with 
legal issues will also be included. 

CJ 617 Correctional Administration 

Prereguisite: CI 610. The basic organization and objectives of a de- 



100 



Criminal Justice 



partment of correction. Specific administrative principles required for effective 
conduct and operation of a correctional organization. 

CJ 618 Probation and Parole: Theory and Practice 

The philosophy, theory and methods employed in probation, parole 
and institutional treatment of the offender. The role of authority, casework, 
classification, treatment policy and administrative orgamzation in determining 
the consequences of correctional practice. 

CJ 619 Seminar in Comparative Criminal Justice Systems 

Prerequisite: CJ610. A cross-cultural study of police, court and 
correctional systems and methods. 

CJ 620 Sociology of Criminal Law 

A study of the social origins and consequences of criminal law and 
legal processes. Emphasis on problems of legal change and the structure and 
functioning of legal sanctions. Emphasis on social and institutional pressures in 
creating socio-legal policy. 

CJ 622 Learning Theory: Applications in Criminal Justice 

Applications of the psychology of learning to police and correction 
settings. 

CJ 624 Group Process in Criminal Justice 

Small group interaction; both theoretical and experimental facets of 
group process are presented. Group counseling and encounter groups. 

CJ 628 Introduction to Systems Theory 

Concepts of systems theory and systems analysis in contemporary 
socio-technical environments. 

CJ 630 Delinquency and Juvenile Crime 

A general introduction to the field of delinquency and crime, including 
all aspects of the social, legal and personal matrix out of which these forms of 
behavior emerge. Special emphasis will be given to the process and implica- 
tions of delinquency labeling. 

CJ 635 Statistics in the Public Sector 

Statistical techniques applied to the public sector. Descriptive statis- 
tics: measures of central tendency and variability. Introduction to statistical 
inference including sampling distribution^ and tests of significance. Some tech- 
niques of nonparametric statistics, multiple regression and elementary decision 
theory. Analysis of variance and covariance. 

CJ 637 Contemporary Issues in Criminal Justice 

Topics selected by students relating to current issues and concerns in 
the field of criminal justice. Each student will be required to write a paper and 
deliver an oral presentation on a selected topic. 

CJ 642 Research Techniques in the Social Sciences 

Research methodology as applied to problems and issues in the field 
of criminal justice. 



101 



Course Descriptions 



CJ 644 Police in Urban Society 

An introduction to some of the current thinking and problems of 
policing in urban society. The course will examine such issues as the historical 
growth of the police, the role and mission of the police, measurement of the 
police tasks, police corruption and other topics of interest to the seminar mem- 
bers. The course will stress the development of analytic thinking in defining 
and dealing with police problems. 

CJ 647 Advanced Criminalistics I (4 credits) 

The comparison and individualization of physical evidence by bio- 
logical and chemical properties is presented in lectures and carried out in the 
laboratory. The theories and practice of microscopic, biological, immunological 
and chemical analysis are applied to the examination of blood, saliva, semenal 
fluid, hair, tissues, botanical evidence and other material of forensic interest. 

Laboratory fee required 

CJ 648 Advanced Criminalistics II (4 credits) 

Advanced microscopic, chemical and instrumental methods will be 
introduced with extensive "hands-on" experience provided by a laboratory 
section. Principles and methods of analysis of microscopic and macroscopic 
evidence such as glass, soil, papers, inks, dyes, paints, varnishes, explosives, 
fibers, drugs and other potential physical traces will be discussed in class. 

Laboratory fee required 

CJ 651 Problems in the Administration of Justice 

A study of the interaction between the law enforcement official and the 
accused beginning with detention and/or arrest, during which time the official 
is seeking to secure incriminating evidence effectively while still protecting 
the Fourth, Fifth and Sixth Amendment constitutional rights of the "presumed 
innocent" accused. 

CJ 655 Bureaucratic Organization of Criminal Justice 

Prerequisite: CJ610. Through an application of modern organiza- 
tional theory, a critical analysis of criminal justice agencies will be made. Em- 
phasis will be placed on viewing criminal justice in theoretical perspective. 
Linkages between theory and opera tionalization of principles will be made. 

CJ 657 Physical Analysis in Forensic Science (4 credits) 

The classic firearms examination, classification and comparison of 
bullets and cartridges, toolmarks comparison and striation analysis, serial 
number restoration, document examination, voice print identification, finger- 
prints and polygraphy examination. 

Laboratory fee required 

CJ 658 Psychiatry and the Law 

An examination of issues that relate to the interaction between the law 
and mental illness and the general role of forensic psychiatry. 

CJ 659 Biomedical Methods in Forensic Science (4 credits) 

Metliods and application of modem toxicology, biochemistry, path- 
ology, dentistry and medicine in forensic science. 

Laboratory fee required 



102 



Criminal Justice 



CJ 670 Selected Issues 

A study of selected issues of particular interest to the students and 
instructor. May be taken more than once. 

CJ 672 Innovative Treatment Programs in Corrections 

The theory and practice of a wide range of innovative correctional 
treatment modalities will be analyzed. Students will be given the opportunity to 
participate in various experiential exercises and to develop and propose new 
treatment approaches. 

CJ 690 Research Project I (1-3 credits) 

Individual guidance on a research endeavor. 

CJ 69 1 Research Project II (1-3 credits) 

Prerequisite: CJ 690. 

CJ 693 Criminal Justice Internship I 

The student's formal educational development will be complemented 
by field placement experience in various criminal justice settings or agencies. 
Field experience will be supervised by designated agency and departmental 
personnel. 

CJ 694 Criminal Justice Internship II 

Prerequisite: CJ 693. 

CJ 695 Independent Study (1-3 credits) 

Student will engage in a directed independent learning experience, 

the topic and format to be agreed upon by the student and supervising faculty. 

CJ697 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: 1 5 graduate hours. Periodic meetings and discussions 
of the individual student's progress toward the completion of the thesis. 

CJ698 Thesis II 

Prerequisite: CJ 697. A continuation of CJ 697, Thesis I. 

CJ699 Thesis III 

Prerequisite: CJ 698. A continuation of CJ 698, Thesis II. 



Department of Communication 

CO 60 1 Basics of Business Media Production Techniques 

This course will provide a survey of the implementation of various 
media in the production of instructional and promotional materials specifically 
for the small and medium business and corporate media departments. The 
course will emphasize both theoretical and practical problems of audio and 
visual systems available to the business situation, paying particular attention to 
the vocabulary and skills which make it possible to transfer an idea from the 
board room to an effective media presentation. Laboratory fee required. 



103 



Course Descriptions 



CO 605 Planning Audio Visual Systems for Business 

Prerequisite: CO 60 1 . This course will use the technology learned in 
the basic course, and apply this to the planning of an audiovisual center within a 
business or corporation setting. Students will be involved in projects of design 
and budget. 

CO 609 Scripting the Media Presentation 

This course is designed to show the student how to select the medium 
appropriate to the message, write a treatment, develop a story board, script the 
message and use proper format. 

CO 613 Media Presentations for Business 

Prerequisite: CO 601 , CO 609. This course is designed to provide 
the student with an opportunity to produce a major instructional or promotional 
media project for a specific business or corporation. The student will be respon- 
sible for finding a sponsor for this project which will be produced in one or any 
of the audio/visual formats discussed and practiced in prerequisite courses. 

Laboratory fee required 
CO 621 The Communication Process 

Major emphasis on the role of communication in a democracy and 
the effects of communication content. Brief treatment of content analysis tech- 
niques, person-to-person communication and barriers to the flow of commu- 
nication. 

CO 670 Selected Topics 

Prerequisite: permission of the adviser. An in-depth examination of a 
topic in the field of communication which reflects the special research of a fac- 
ulty member, or the special interest of a group of students. 

CO 693 Internship 

A program of field experience set up by the student and approved 
by the program adviser under the tutelage of a professional in the field. 

CO 695 Independent Study I 

A planned program of individual study or research in communica- 
tion under the supervision of a member of the faculty. 

CO 696 Independent Study II 

Prerequisite: CO 695. 

CO 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: 1 5 graduate hours. Periodic meetings with the adviser 
of the individual student's progress in the preparation of a thesis. 

CO 699 Thesis II 

Prerequisite: CO 698. A continuahon of CO 698, Thesis I. 



104 



English / Economics 



Department of English 

E600 The Uses of Language No Credit 

Limited to qualified international students who speak a language other 
than English. Emphasis upon conversation, pronunciation, composition and 
laboratory work in the English language. 



Department of Economics 

EC 600 Basic Economics No Credit 

A basic theoretical foundation for students who have a deficiency in 

economics. The course is a review and refresher of basic economic principles. 

EC 603 Microeconomic Analysis 

Prerequisite: undergraduate Principles of Economics or EC 600, 
Basic Economics. Topics in resource allocation and price determination. Theo- 
ries of choice of consumers, firms, resource owners under monopoly, monop- 
sony, competition and alternative market forms. 

EC 604 Macroeconomic Analysis 

Prerequisite: undergraduate Principles of Economics or EC 600, 
Basic Economics. An examination of the roles of consumption, investment, 
government finance and money influencmg national income and output, em- 
ployment, the price level and rate of growth. Policies for economic stability 
and growth. 

EC 608 Economics for Public Administrators 

An examination of the roles of consumption, investment, government 
expenditure and money influencing national income, output, employment and 
price level, and growth rate. Special emphasis upon the roles of fiscal and 
monetary policy and the economics of contemporary social problems. 

EC 620 Economic History of Western Europe 

A survey of the economic development of western Europe from 1 500 
to the present. Topics covered include mercantilism, industrialization, imper- 
ialism and the emergence of planned economics. 

EC 625 Industrial Relations 

A survey of the problems, strategies and policies of management and 
unions in conflict situations and in harmonizing labor -management relations. 
Labor legislation, collective bargaining and alternative strategies, productivity 
and other problem areas in labor -management relations are examined. 

EC 627 Economics of Labor Relations 

A survey of labor economics and the economics of labor relations 



105 



Course Descriptions 



using both the tools of economic analysis and institutional analysis. The empha- 
sis is on the application of economics to labor problems and labor -management 
relations. 

EC 629 Public Policies Toward Business 

Prerequisite: EC 603-604. A survey of the economic aspects of 
governmental and business relations. Emphasizes the concept of public control 
over certain types of business and certain forms of business activity. Combina- 
tion movements, pricing procedures, anti-trust laws and agencies enforcing 
them, regulation of transportation and public utilities, rate-making for transport, 
pricing public utility services, consumer protection and social responsibility. 

EC 630 Structure of American Industry 

An examination of several major U.S. industries such as automobiles, 
steel, petroleum, defense and agriculture. Some contemporary problems are 
analyzed. A study of the powerful economic forces acting on these industries 
and how firms react to these forces. 

EC 635 Comparative Economic Systems 

Prerequisite: EC 603-604. Capitalism, Socialism, Communism and 
other economic systems will be examined with respect to their theoretical foun- 
dations and practical applications, including the interrelationships among 
economic, political and social institijtions. 

EC 641 International Economics 

Prerequisite: EC 603-604. A study of the basic theory and major in- 
stitutions of "international economic relations. Examines critically the techniques 
and background of protectionism and free trade, and the analysis of customs, 
unions and price and exchange rate changes. The theory of comparative ad- 
vantage; the gains from trade and the terms of trade. The balance of payments 
and national income. Capital movements and economic growth. The evolution 
of the world economy and international economic institutions. Effects of growth 
on trade, and trade on growth. Monopolisitc practices in international trade. 
The international monetary system and international monetary reforms. 

EC 645 Seminar in Macroeconomic Policy 

Prerequisite: EC 603-604. The impact of fiscal and monetary policy 
upon employment, output and prices. An analysis of past and current economic 
controls and their impact upon the economy. 

EC 653 Econometrics 

Prerequisites: EC 603-604, OA 604-605, or permission of the in- 
structor. A presentation of the important statistical concepts used in 
econometrics. Topics covered are regression theory, multiple regression, 
regression extensions, correlation, serial correlation, correlated regressor and 
error, the identification problem, selected estimating techniques. 

EC 658 Transportation Economics 

Prerequisite: EC 603-604. A study of \he principal economic prob- 
lems arising in connection with the development and regulation of railroads 
and other modes of transport. 



106 



Economics 



EC 660 Economic Development of Japan 

Prerequisite: EC 603-604. A study in the modernization and eco- 
nomic growth of modem Japan since the Meiji Restoration (1869). Topics in- 
clude the role of government and planning, and of foreign trade, investment 
and technology; resource allocation, economic organization, capital formation, 
agricultural policies, population growth and social change. 

EC 665 Urban and Regional Economic Development 

Prerequisite: EC 603-604. Structure of the urban and regional eco- 
nomy; goals, processes, problems and policy in urban and regional economic 
development. 

EC 668 Economics of Crime 

Prerequisite: EC 603-604. Topics include the economic costs of 
crime; the costs of preventing crime; the impact of white collar crime on Amer- 
ican society. 

EC 670 Selected Topics 

A study of selected issues of particular interest to the students and in- 
structor. May be taken more than once. 

EC 687 Collective Bargaining 

Prerequisite: EC 625. Emphasis on the negotiating process. The 
labor contract as it involves wages, worker security, management authority 
and handling of grievances arising during the life of the contract. 

EC 690 Research Project 

Prerequisite: 1 5 graduate hours or permission of the instructor. Inde- 
pendent study under the supervision of an adviser. 

EC 692 Readings in Economics 

EC 695 Independent Study I 

A planned program of individual study under the supervision of a 
member of the faculty. 

EC 696 Independent Study 11 
Prerequisite: EC 695. 

EC 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: 1 5 graduate hours. Periodic meetings and discussions 
of the individual student's progress in the preparation of a thesis. 

EC 699 Thesis II 

Prerequisite: EC 698. A continuation of EC 698, Thesis I. 



107 



Course Descriptions 



Department of Electrical Engineering 

EE 601 Engineering Analysis I 

Application of multidimensional linear vector space concepts to the 
analysis and synthesis of engineering systems. Topics include matrices, linear 
transformations, orthogonality, function spaces and the resolutions of signals. 

EE 602 Engineering Analysis II 

Applications of the methods of complex variables and their analytic 
functions to engineering systems. Topics include analytic function theory, con- 
formal mapping, transform methods and transfer functions. 

EE 603 Discrete and Continuous Systems I 

Prerequisite: EE 601 . Discrete and continuous linear system models. 
State variable representation and transfer function representation. Feedback 
control systems, stability, performance and design criteria. State variable and 
compensation synthesis. Nonlinear systems, describing functions and phase 
plane techniques. Stability methods of Liapunov. 

EE 604 Discrete and Continuous Systems II 

Prerequisite: EE 603. 

EE 605 Modern Control Systems 

Prerequisite: EE 604. Advanced topics in control systems. May in- 
clude optimal control, dynamic programming, variational approaches, adap- 
tive control, sampled data systems, signal modulated systems, random signal 
methods. 

EE 608 Computer -Aided Design 

Prerequisite: EE 601. Numerical algorithms for engineering systems 
analysis. The design problem and performance measures. Optirriization of net- 
works and filters. Parameter sensitivities. Device modeling and equivalent 
circuits. 

EE 615 Computer Logic and Intelligence 

Prerequisite: IE 603 (or equivalent). Introduction to logic elements 
and to their application in digital networks for processing numencal data. The 
course will deal with analysis and design techniques and will include the fol- 
lowing topics: logic variables, switching functions, optimal realizations, Kar- 
naugh maps and tabular procedures, multivariable systems. Detailed consider- 
ation of coding, parity bit redundancy and error detecting and correcting 
schemes will be presented. Design examples will include logic circuits for addi- 
tion, multiplication, counting, pjarity generation and detection. 

EE 630 Electronic Instrumentation I 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Design of modern electronic 
instrumentation. Circuit and system examples, critical evaluation and design 
techniques. Emphasis on practical applications including design theory and 
the circuit techniques used in Imear integrated devices. Vanety of electronic 
instrumentation including computer interfaces, signal conditioners, waveform 
generators and shapers, hlters, V/F, A/D, D/A converters and other special 
purpose circuits. 



108 



Electrical Engineering 



EE 631 Electronic Instrumentation II 

Prerequisite: EE 630. 

EE 634 Digital Signal Processing I 

Prerequisite: EE 603. A study of the theories of digital signal process- 
ing and their applicabons. Topics include discrete time signals, Z transform, the 
discrete Fourier Transform, the EFT, digital filter design techniques, homomor- 
phic signal processing and various applications of digital signal processing. 

EE 635 Digital Signal Processing II 

Prerequisite: EE 634. 

EE 640 Computer Engineering I 

A study of the structure and organization of PDP 11-10 computer. 
Operating system, peripheral devices, addressing memory, assembler instruc- 
tion set, programmed requests, real-time software modules, assembler lan- 
guage programming. 

EE 641 Computer Engineering II 

Prerequisite: EE 640. Applications of computers to physical systems 
for monitor control functions. Interfacing using hardware modules. Case studies 
may include synchronous motor transient studies, shock wave phenomena, 
dynamic chemical reaction monitoring and control, signal processing, sampled 
data control systems. Students must complete a project. 

EE 645 Power Systems Engineering I 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Concepts and methods of anal- 
ysis and design of modem power systems will be treated. This will include the 
network representation of power systems, matrix methods, symmetrical com- 
ponents and the use of the computer in the solution of problems such as short 
circuit fault calculations, load flow study, economic load dispatching and sta- 
bility. Other topics may include protection, relaying or transmission system 
design. 

EE 646 Power Systems Engineering II 

Prerequisite: EE 645. 

EE 650 Random Signal Analysis 

A study of the theory of random signals and processes. Topics include 
a review of probability, random signals, auto and cross correlation, power 
density, spectral analysis of random signals. 

EE 658 Microprocessors - Theory & Applications 

Prerequisite: EE 640. A study of the techniques and methods of de- 
signing digital systems using a microprocessor as the basic unit. Microcom- 
puter assembly language, operating systems, input/output devices, program- 
.mable read-only memories and interfacing. Students must complete a project. 

EE 670 Special Topics - Electrical Engineering 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. A study of selected topics of 
particular interest to students and instructor. Course may be taken more than 
once. 



109 



Course Descriptions 



EE 695 Independent Study I 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. A planned program of indi- 
vidual study or research under the supervision of a faculty member. 

EE 696 Independent Study II 

Prerequisite: EE 695. 

EE 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: completion of 15 credits of graduate work. Individual 
student project under supervision of faculty adviser. Written and oral report 
required. Student must enroll m 6 credits of thesis. 

EE699 Thesis II 

Prerequisite; EE 698. Continuation of EE 698, Thesis I. 



Executive M.B.A. Program 

EXID 903 The Communication Process 

Communication needs in corporate staff development: cohesion, 
cooperation, and consensus through effective communication management. 
The role of communication in thought processes and problem solving. 

EXID 906 The Management Process 

The role of executives and managers in administrative and opera- 
tional processes. Topics include organizational goals and structure, planning 
and performance controls and resource management. 

EXID 909 Business and Government Relations 

Recent developments and future directions of the business and 
government interface. Includes contracts, affirmative action, labor negotiation 
machinery, regulatory agencies and anti-trust legislation. 

EXID 912 Financial Accounting 

Analysis of the objectives, standards and methods embodied in 
the financial accounting information system. Emphasis is upon financial report- 
ing standards as they relate to financial position, results of operations and 
changes in financial position. 

EXID 915 Quantitative Decision Making 

Examination of statistical methods and their relevance to decision 
making under uncertainty. Includes an introduction to probability, elements of 
statistical decision theory and Bayesian analysis. 

EXID 918 Managerial Economics 

Application of economic analysis to business forecasting, planning 
and policy formation. Topics include cost-benefit analysis, cost estimation and 
break -even analysis. 



110 



Executive M.B.A. 



EXID 92 1 Executive Development Seminar 

Examination of a variety of methods of executive development. 
Role-playing, business games, sensitivity training and transactional analysis. 

EXID 924 Financial Management I 

Analysis of financial decision models for investment, financing and 
dividend decisions of the profit -oriented firm. Includes capital budgeting, capi- 
tal structure and the cost of capital and dividend policy. 

EXID 927 Financial Management II 

Analysis of financial decision models for the management of work- 
ing capital. The management of current assets and the related financing mixture. 

EXID 930 Marketing Management 

The marketing concept and corporate decision making with re- 
spect to product planning, advertising and promotion, sales management, dis- 
tribution channels and price policies. 

EXID 933 International Business Seminar 

Examination of the theory of international trade, exporting and 
importing, cultural dynamics and comparative management and marketing 
systems. 

EXID 936 Logistics and Distribution 

The design, administration and control of product flows. The im- 
portance of total cost planning and alternate channel strategies. 

EXID 939 Operations Research and Management 

Analysis of management science technigues from the executive 
perspective. Focus on understanding the value of inventory and systems mo- 
dels, forecasting methods and simulation techniques. 

EXID 942 Managerial Accounting 

Examination of accounting tools for planning, controlling and 
evaluating the economic performance of the firm. Topics include budgeting, 
flexible budgets, standard costs, contribution reporting, responsibility account- 
ing and decision analysis. 

EXID 945 Human Resource Management 

The effective management of the aggregate human resource in 
the modern organization. Analysis of pDersonnel policies and procedures, man- 
power planning and employee b"aining and policies. 

EXID 948 Labor-Management Relations 

Contemporary issues in labor -management relations are analyzed 
including collective bargaining, grievance -arbitration procedures and the 
expanding impact of organized labor on manpower management. 

EXID 95 1 Marketing Management Seminar 

Current issues and topics in marketing management. Includes re- 
cent regulatory rulings, consumerism and related areas. 



Ill 



Course Descriptions 



EXID 954 Organizatinal Development 

Various methods for effective organizational development in con- 
temporary environments. Analysis of means to improve existing organizations 
in consideration of past history and changing value structures. 

EXID 957 Corporate Policy and Strategy 

Analytical frameworks are developed through the study of major 
corporate policies and strategies. Focus is upon the total organization and com- 
prehensive operation procedures of the complex corporation. 

EXID 960 The Executive Seminar 

The capstone course of the program. Four separate one-meeting 
topics such as reducing executive stress, increasing effectiveness, the executive 
role in business and society, etc. 



Courses in Finance 
Department of Accounting 

FI 615 Finance 

Prerequisites: EC 603-604, QA 604, A 600 or equivalent. The in- 
vestment, financing and valuation of business firms. Topics include: discounted 
cash flow, return on investment, investment decisions under uncertainty, long- 
and short-term sources of funds, optimal financial structure, cost of capital, 
dividend policy, expansion, merger and failure and reorganization. 

FI 6 1 7 Financial Institutions and Capital Markets 

Prerequisites: EC 603-604, OA 604. This course stresses the rela- 
tionship between the financial system and the level, growth, and stability of 
aggregate economic activity. Analyzes the institutional and theoretical structure 
of monetary change and the manner in which financial institutions and markets 
transmit and influence the impact of monetary policy. Special attention to the 
role of nonmonetary financial intermediaries, the structure and regulation of 
capital markets, and the functions of market yields as the price mechanism that 
allocates saving to various categories of economic investments. 

FI 619 Monetary and Central Banking Policy 

Prerequisites: EC 603-604, OA 604. The impact of monetary change 
upon employment, output and prices; the formulation and execution of Federal 
Reserve policy designed to regulate money, credit and interest rates. 

FI 645 Corporate Financial Theory 

Prerequisites: FI 615, FI 651 . An analysis of the theoretical structure 
supporting optimum financial decision making by the business firm. Emphasis 
is placed upon the determination of the combination of investment, financing 
and dividend decisions that maximizes the valuation of the firm within a security 
market context. 



112 



Finance 



FI 649 Security Analysis 

Prerequisite: FI 651 . An analysis of the determinants of valuation for 
fixed income securities, common stocks, convertible securities and common 
stock warrants. Emphasis is placed upon the information and techniques rele- 
vant to security valuation and selection and the structure and workings of the 
securities markets. 

FI 65 1 Portfolio Management and Capital Market Analysis 

Prerequisites: EC 603-604, QA 604, A 600 (or equivalent). Consi- 
ders the theoretical structure for the procedures (security analysis, portfolio 
analysis and portfolio selection) which constitute the process of portfolio man- 
agement, as well as their limitations in practice. Additional attention is placed 
upon the logical implications of portfolio analysis for capital market theory. 

FI 655 Commodity Market Analysis 

Prerequisites: EC 603-604, QA 604. A conceptual and operational 
examination of the markets in which commodities are traded, the participants 
and major exchanges including an analysis of the major commodities traded 
and the factors influencing their prices. 

FI 661 Real Estate: Principles and Practices 

Prerequisites: EC 603-604, QA 604. Real estate from the investor's 
point of view. Impact of taxation on real estate investments. Emphasis on com- 
mercial land use through the use of case studies and problems. 

FI 670 Selected Topics 

A study of selected issues of particular interest to the students and in- 
structor. May be taken more than once. 

FI 690 Research Project 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours or permission of the instructor. Inde- 
pendent study under the supervision of an adviser. 

FI 695 Independent Study I 

A planned program of individual study under the supervision of a 
member of the faculty. 

FI 696 Independent Study 11 

Prerequisite: FI 696. 

FI698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: 1 5 graduate hours. Periodic meetings and discussions of 
the individual student's progress in the preparation of a thesis. 

FI699 Thesis II 

Prerequisite: FI 698. A continuation of FI 698, Thesis I. 



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Course Descriptions 



Department of Hotel Management, 
Tourism and Travel 

HM 610 Content Seminar in Hospitality /Institutional/Tourism 
Administration 

Detailed analysis of recent developments in tounsnn and mass food 
service administration. 

HM 625 Supervisory and Leadership Analysis in Tourism, 
Hospitality and Institutional Operations 

An incident approach is used to provide a cross section of super- 
visory situations that have faced hospitality management. Emphasis 
is given to particular situations involving leadership developments, ethical 
behavior and social responsibility. 

HM 630 Personnel and Labor Relations in the 
Hospitality /Tourism/Institutional Fields 

Topics include organizational behavior, personnel selection, place- 
ment, supervision, job evaluation, wage and salary administration, motivation 
morale and union -management relations. Case studies and role playing are in- 
tegral parts of the course. 

HM 640 Haute Cuisine for Hospitality Executives 

An advanced course which covers the study and preparation of 
classical food items and service of the major world cuisines, culminated with the 
serving of a formal banquet. Laboratory fee required. 

HM 655 Development of Hotel/Restaurant/Institutional Food Services 

Examines the processes for developing profitable hotel, restaurant 
and institutional services. Some of the characteristics, opportunities, risks and 
decisions involved in starting hospitality and travel enterprises and institutional 
food services are studied. 

HM 660 Comparative Tourism 

Prerequisite: permission of department chairman. A detailed study of 
tourism developments in Connecticut compared with similar developments in a 
foreign state. Arrangements will be made for an on-site visit to a foreign country 
to facilitate the comparative study. 

HM 690 Research in Tourism/Hospitality/Institutional Administration 

Prerequisite; permission of department chairman. Independent 
study under the supervision of an adviser. 

HM698 Thesis! 

Prerequisite: 1 5 graduate hours, permission of the department chair- 
man. Periodic meetings and discussions of the individual student's progress in 
the preparation of a thesis. 

HM 699 Thesis 11 

Prerequisite: HM 698, permission of the department chairman. A 
continuation of HM 698, Thesis 1. 



114 



Hotel Management, Tourism and Travel/Humanities 



Department of Humanities 

COLLOOUIA: 

HU 601-602 Themes in Western Thought and Culture: Greece, Rome 

Readings in primary sources of some of the classics in Western 
thought from Homer to the Renaissance. The place of these selected works in 
the development of Western ideas. 

HU 606 Humanism and Its Methodology 

A classic idea, work of art, musical composition, work of literature, 
historical event, and the variety of the critical appraisals of it. 

HU 611 Historical Views and Views of History 

A survey of modern Western Historiography with particular attention 
to the methodology of recent and contemporary historians. 

HU 616 Art and Thought of the Renaissance 

A study of the achievements of some of the major figures of the 
Renaissance in art, music, philosophy, natural science, literature, drama. 

HU 62 1 The Age of the Enlightenment 

Philosophical background of the Age of Reason and its effects upon 
the art, music, and literature of the period. 

HU 626 The Age of Darwin 

Scientific thought of the period and its effect upon religious and 
philosophical ideas, upon art and literature, and upon the development of 
sociological thought. 

HU 631 Culture and Ethics in the Modern Age 

Popular attitudes and rational concepts that determine the structure 
of contemporary America. 

HU 636 Philosophical Thought 

An examination of the changes in meaning and use of such enduring 
themes as certainty, existence, God, justice, knowledge, law, right, good. 

HU 638 Structuralism and Structural Linguistics 

An introduction to the basic principles of structuralism, with special 
emphasis given to elements of language and linguistic theory. 

HU 641 Technology and Human Values 

The influence of applied science and technology on our conceptions 
of ourselves, our society and our environment. 

HU 646 The Social Sciences in Our Time 

How the social sciences are related to the humariities, estimates of 
the human condition in the light of developments in sociology, history, political 
science, psychology and economics. 



115 



Course Descriptions 



SEMINARS 

HU 651-689 Seminars 

Study of a variety of current subjects and specialized areas of 
study within the designated field. Students may take more than one seminar 
in the same general area. 

HU 651-659 Topics in Humanities 

HU 661-669 Topics in History 

HU 671-679 Topics in Philosophy 

HU 681-689 Topics in the Natural, Physical and Social Sciences 

HU 691-695 Independent Study 

A planned program of individual study or research under the super- 
vision of a member of the faculty. 

HU 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: 1 5 graduate hours. Periodic meetings and discussions 
of the individual student's progress m the preparabon of a thesis. 

HU699 Thesis II 

Prerequisite: HU 698. A continuation of HU 698, Thesis I. 



Courses in International Business 
Department of Marketing 

IB 643 International Business Operations 

Prerequisites: EC 603-604. A summary of the economic, foreign 
environment and instructional concepts and constraints encountered by inter- 
national business, and how they apply to decisions by managers of business 
operations and makers of official policy. 

IB 644 Import and Export Business 

Prerequisites: MK 609, IB 643. A managerial approach to interna- 
tional marketing; emphasis on controllable and uncontrollable variables affect- 
ing marketing strategies, evaluation of foreign suppliers, methods of financing 
imports and exports, and documentation for import and export marketing. 

IB 645 Structure of World Markets 

Prerequisites: MK 609, IB 643. An intensive study of Asia, western 
and eastern Europe and South America as a complementary trade region for 
the United States firm. The area is surveyed as a present and potential market 
as well as an import source. Consideration is given to the histoncal and racial 
background of the people; their political, social and educational development; 
the resources and economic development of the countries in the area; and 
business practices unique to the area and its countries. 



116 



International Business Marketing/Industrial Engineering 



IB 65 1 Comparative Marketing 

Prerequisites: MK 609, IB 643. A systematic study of the national 
and regional basis of socioeconomic conditions and of distributive business 
activities. The analysis of international similarities and differences in marketing 
functions, structures, processes, and factors as related to the physical, eco- 
nomic, political, social and cultural environments. The dynamic changes under 
way in marketing systems are also considered. 

IB 652 Multinational Business Operations 

Prerequisites: MK 609, IB 643. Managerial problems and strategies 
m foreign operations; structuring international operations through acquisition, 
licensing, or joint venture; the assessment of local competition; the impact of 
foreign environments; and legal, political and cultural problems facing the 
multinational firm in its relationship with its host countries. 

IB 670 Selected Issues 

A study of selected issues of particular interest to the students and in- 
structor. May be taken more than once. 

IB 690 Research Project 

Prerequisite: 1 5 graduate hours and permission of the instructor. In- 
dependent study under the supervision of an adviser. 

IB 695 Independent Study I 

A planned program of individual study under the supervision of a 
member of the faculty. 

IB 696 Independent Study II 

Prerequisite: IB 695. 

IB 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: 1 5 graduate hours. Periodic meetings and discussions of 
the individual student's progress in the preparation of a thesis. 

IB 699 Thesis II 

Prerequisite: IB 698. A continuation of IB 698, Thesis I. 



Department of Industrial Engineering 

IE 601 Introduction to Operations Research/Management Science 

Prerequisites: M 610, IE 607 or QA 604 or equivalent. Introduction 
to the techniques and philosophies of management science and operations 
research. Topics include linear programming, inventory analysis, queuing 
theory, dynamic programming, decision analysis and other management 
techniques. 

IE 602 Quality Analysis 

Prerequisite: IE 607. Concepts of quality control and statistical quality 
analysis. Sampling techniques and decision processes. 



117 



Course Descriptions 



IE 603C Introduction to Digital Computers: COBOL 

An introduction to the basic elements of computer science including 
computer hardware, software, information and data processing. Programming 
concepts are introduced using COBOL, a common business -oriented lan- 
guage. A student who has taken IE 603F will not be given credit for IE 603C. 

Laboratory fee required 

IE 603F Introduction to Digital Computers: FORTRAN 

An introduction to the basic elements of computer science in- 
cluding computer hardware, software, information and data processing. 
Programming concepts are introduced using FORTRAN, a common 
language that is well -suited for scientific and technical work. A student 
who has taken IE 603C will not be given credit for IE 603F. 

Laboratory fee required 

IE 604 Management Systems 

Techniques of industrial and governmental systems management in- 
cluding general systems and organizational theory. 

IE 605 Advanced Business Programming 

Prerequisites: IE 603C or proficiency in language similar to COBOL. 
Advanced programming in COBOL or other business -oriented language 
within an applied business systems context. Laboratory fee required 

IE 606 Advanced Technical Programming 

Prerequisites: IE 603F or proficiency in a language similar to FOR- 
TRAN. Advanced programming in FORTRAN or other technically -oriented 
language with emphasis on scientific and technical applications. 

Laboratory fee required 

IE 607 Probability Theory 

Prerequisite: M 610 or equivalent. Probability of events. Random 
variables and expectations; discrete and continuous distributions; important 
standard distributions and applications; moment generating functions; central 
limit theorem. 

IE 608 Assembler Language 

Description of the general functional characteristics of a computer's 
main storage and peripheral units. Interrupt philosophy and interrupt service 
routines. Discussion of the general philosophy of assembler instructions, code 
conversion of I/O to and from main memory and familiarization with appro- 
priate reference manuals. Micro instructions will be introduced to allow for 
writing and running of assembler programs. Macro instructions will be devel- 
op)ed to demonstrate techniques for reduced programming time. 

Laboratory fee required 

IE 610 Computer Systems Selection 

Prerequisites: IE 605 or IE 606, IE 614. Techniques for selecting, 
installing, and operating computer systems and their peripheral equipment. 
Concepts of decisions with respect to compiler and hardware selection. Devel- 
opment of operating procedures, form design, systems charting and documen- 
tation. 



118 



Industrial Engineering 



IE 61 1 Budgeting and Control 

Prerequisite: A 600. An analytic approach as applied to the principles 
and policies of operational budgeting and control of expense and capital in- 
vestments. Includes forecasting techniques, development of totally integrated 
systems with traditional financial statements and controls from top management 
to first -line supervision. 

IE 6 1 2 Managerial Interactions I 

An interdisciplinary systems approach to human behavior in organi- 
zations with emphasis on the impact of industrial engineering methods on 
organizational performance. The first course will deal with individual motiva- 
tion and face -to -face interaction in managerial roles; the second concentrates 
on organizational development, job enrichment, and modem work attitudes. 

IE 613 Managerial Interactions II 

Prerequisite: IE 612. 

IE 614 Data Information Systems 

Prerequisites: IE 603 or equivalent, IE 604. Introduction to automated 
information systems planning and operations and their impact on management 
decision making, control functions and communication capabilities. An over- 
view of concepts and procedures with applications in urban environments, 
large organizations and governmental agencies. Techniques presented include 
PERT/CPM, Gantt charting, cost-benefit analysis. 

IE 615 Transportation and Distribution 

Prerequisite: IE 601 . Introduction to transportation science with em- 
phasis on physical distribution problems. Survey of operations research models 
and optimization strategies and their roles in transportation systems manage- 
ment. 
IE 6 1 9 Enterprise Design and Evaluation 

Prerequisite: IE 601 . An analysis of the principles and methods used 
in estimating the probable economic characteristics of proposed enterprises. 
The student is required to formulate a proposed enterprise, including the tech- 
nical, financial and organizational requirements. 

IE 62 1 Linear Programming 

Prerequisites: M 610 or equivalent, IE 601 or equivalent. Thorough 
coverage of the techniques and applications of linear programming, a powerful 
operations research tool for optimal allocation of limited resources in linear 
systems. 

IE 622 Queuing Theory 

Prerequisites: IE 601, IE 607. Elements of queuing theory including 
finite and infinite cases. Single server and multiple server parallel channels, 
series queues and special cases are analyzed. Experimental methods, including 
simulation, are presented in the context of industnal environments. 

IE 623 Decision Analysis 

Prerequisite: OA 605 or IE 607. Decision theory, game theory, and 
stochastic decision processes. Benefit -cost analyses under uncertainty. 



119 



Course Descriptions 



IE 63 1 Production Engineering 

Prerequisites: IE 601 , IE 602. An analysis and practical application of 
engineering activity that results in the transformation of natural resources into a 
finished product. 

IE 641 Quality Control Economics 

Prerequisites: IE 602, IE 607 or OA 604. An economic managerial 
analysis of statistical quality control sampling and control chart systems with 
application to accepted and hybrid systems. 

IE 643 Reliability and Maintainability 

Prerequisites: IE 602, IE 607 or OA 604. The basic theory and meth- 
odology of reliability and maintainability, including application of discrete and 
continuous distributions and statistical designs. Reliability, estimation, structure 
models and growth models. 

IE 65 1 Human Engineering I 

A broad coverage of the physiological, psychological, and socio- 
logical aspects of man and the society in which he lives and works. Special 
topics include human factors, motivation, group dynamics and ekistics. 

IE 652 Human Engineering II 

Prerequisite: IE 651. 

IE 655 Value Engineering 

Consideration of value analysis from the point of view of design, man- 
ufacturability, procurement, installation and maintainability in order to optimize 
value in products. 

IE 670 Current Topics in Computer and Information Science 

Prerequisites: IE 601, IE 603, or permission of the instructor. An ex- 
amination of new developments or current practices in computer and informa- 
tion science. A topic will be selected, for thorough study; possible subject areas 
include data structures, recent hardware or software advances, specialized ap 
plications. Content may vary from semester to semester 

IE 671 Current Topics in Operations Research 

Prerequisites: IE 601, IE 607, IE 621 or permission of the instructor. 
An examination of new developments or current practices in operations 
research. A topic will be selected for thorough study; possible subject areas in- 
clude non-linear programming, network theory, scheduling techniques, 
specialized applications. Content may vary from semester to semester. 

IE 672 Current Topics in Industrial Engineering 

Prerequisite: IE 601 or permission of the instructor. An examination 
of new developments or current practices in industrial engineering. A topic 
will be selected for thorough study— possible subject areas include reliability, 
production engineering, human factors, specialized applications. Content may 
vary from semester to semester. 

IE 681 System Simulation 

Prerequisites: IE 601 or equivalent, IE 606 or equivalent. A study of 
the behavior of systems using computer simulation models of their organiza- 



120 



Economics 



tional structure and decision criteria. Laboratory fee required 

IE 682 Compiler Design 

Prerequisite: IE 605 or IE606 or permission of the instructor. Design 
and operation of assemblers and macroprocessors. Introduction to compiler 
design. Metalanguage. Lexical and syntactic analysis. Interpretive systems. 
Control of translation, loading and execution. Relocating loaders and overlay 
generation. Symbolic coding systems. 

IE 683 Systems Analysis 

Prerequisites: IE 601 or QA 605, IE 614. Techniques and philoso- 
phies defining the concept of systems analysis are presented in detail and illus- 
trated with large scale case studies. Diverse systems are analyzed covering the 
social, urban, industrial and military spheres. Techniques presented include 
utility theory, decision analysis, and technological forecasting. 

IE 684 Multiprogramming Systems 

Prerequisite: IE 605 or IE 606 or permission of the instructor. Topics 
in the areas of operating systems and computer architecture. Multiprogram- 
ming and multiprocessor systems. Dynamic storage allocation and virtual 
memory systems. Time-sharing systems. On-line, real-time systems. 

IE 685 Theory of Optimization 

Prerequisites: calculus, IE 603F or equivalent. Nonlinear and dynamic 
programming with special reference to computer analysis of optimization 
problems. 

IE 686 Inventory Analysis 

Prerequisites: IE 601, IE 607 or QA 605. Inventory theory and prac- 
tical applications in operating inventory systems. Model construction, optimi- 
zation and computer simulation. 

IE 688 Design of Experiments 

Prerequisite: IE 689 or three credit hours of statistical inference. Prin- 
ciples of modern statistical experimentation and practice in use of basic designs 
for scientific and industrial experiments; single factor experiments, randomized 
blocks, latin squares; factorial and fractional factorial experiments; surface 
fitting designs. 

IE 689 Descriptive and Inferential Statistics 

Prerequisite: IE 607 or equivalent. Inferential statistical designs, in- 
cluding basic statistical tests and analysis of variance. Statistical theories and 
application of correlation analysis, multiple linear regression, nonlinear 
regression, and analysis of covariance. 

IE 690 Seminar Project 

Prerequisites: 1 5 credit hours and permission of the program coordi- 
nator. Independent study under the guidance of an adviser into an area of 
mutual interest, such study terminating in a technical report of academic merit. 
Research may constitute a survey of a technical area in industrial engineering, 
operations research or computer science, or may involve the solution of an 
actual or hypothetical technical problem. 



121 



Course Descriptions 



IE 695 Independent Study 

Prerequisite; permission of the program coordinator. Independent 
study under the guidance of an adviser into an area designated by the pro- 
gram coordinator. 

IE 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours. Periodic meetings and discussion of 
the individual student's progress in the preparation of a thesis. 

IE 699 Thesis II 

Prerequisite: IE 698. A continuation of IE 698, Thesis I. 



Courses in Business Law 
Department of Accounting 

LA 673 Business Law I: Contracts and Sales 

Survey of the legal aspects of contracts and the results of contractual 
obligations. Legal problems stemming from the distribution of goods; generally 
the rights and duties of buyers and sellers and the remedies available to them. 

LA 674 Business Law II: Business Organizations and Negotiable 
Instruments 

Basic introduction to problems of formation and operation of legal 
groups and general legal survey of the role of agency, partnerships and cor- 
porations and other complex entities in modern society. 



Department of Mattiematics 

M 610 Fundamentals of Calculus and Linear Algebra 

Prerequisite: M 115 or equivalent. Review of algebra. Topics from 
calculus, including differentiation and integration methods, applied to pro- 
blems in science, business, and the social sciences. Linear algebra, systems of 
linear equations and matrix methods. 

M 620 Numerical Analysis 

Prerequisite: 9 credit hours of calculus and programming ability in 
FORTRAN. Algorithms for obtaining numerical solutions on computers. Topics 
include: solution of nonlinear equations by iterative methods, matrix inversion, 
evaluation of determinants, solution of systems of linear equations by direct 
and iterative methods, numerical integration, differentiation and solution of 
differential equations by finite difference methods. 

Laboratory fee required. 



122 



Business Law/Mathematics/Mechanical Engineering 



M 624 Applied Mathematics 

Topics in applied mathematics including ordinary and partial differen- 
tial equations, linear analysis and boundary value problems. 



Department of Mechanical Engineering 

ME 602 Boundary Value Problems 

Solution techniques involving boundary values to physical systems. 
Special functions, orthogonality, eigenvalue problems. 

ME 603 Approximation Methods 

Prerequisite: ME 602. Techniques for realizing engineering solutions 
to complex systems. Asymptotic expansions and perturbation methods among 
topics. 

ME 604 Numerical Methods 

Prerequisite: knowledge of FORTRAN. Quantitative techniques 
adaptable for computer solutions to engineering problems. Curve fitting, 
transcendental equations, simultaneous equations and numerical integration 
and differentiation. 

ME 610 Advanced Dynamics 

Kinematics and dynamics of particles and systems of particles. La- 
grange's equations. Hamilton's principles and canonical transformation theory. 
The inertia tensor and rigid body motion. 

ME 611 System Vibrations 

Advanced techniques for analysis of vibrations in mechanical sys- 
tems. Multiple degrees of freedom, random noise inputs among topics. 

ME 615 Theory of Elasticity 

Cartesian tensor notation, integral theorems, orthogonal curvilinear 
coordinates. Stress tensor, dynamical conservation equations, isotropy and 
anisotropy. Boussinesq-Popkovltch potentials. Wave equations. 

ME 620 Classical Thermodynamics 

Phenomenological equilibrium and nonequilibrium thermodynamics. 
Formulation and application of fundamental laws and concepts, chemical ther- 
modynamics. 

ME 622 Statistical Thermodynamics 

Prerequisite: ME 620. Development of methods of statistical thermo- 
dynamics within the framework of the molecular theory of matter. Presentation 
of the role of spectra and intermolecular forces in the interpretation of thermo- 
dynamic properties of ideal systems, gases, solids and plasmas. 

ME 625 Mechanics of Continua 

Prerequisite: ME 6 1 5 or permission of the instructor. Tensor analysis, 



123 



Course Descriptions 



the stress vector and the stress tensor, kinematics of deformation, material deriv- 
ative, fundamental laws of continuum mechanics, conservation theorems, con- 
stitutive laws, and representative applications. 

ME 627 Plasticity 

Study of permanent deformation of metals and non-metals. Topics to 
include yield surfaces, creep, theories of fracture and time dependent effects. 

ME 628 Modern Materials 

Survey of the forefront of current engineering materials and pro- 
cessing techniques. Representative topics might include composites, super- 
alloys, laser fabrication and continuous casting techniques. 

ME 630 Advanced Fluid Mechanics 

Properties of gases at high temperatures. Gas flows involving ioni- 
zation and chemical reactions. High-speed and nonsteady flows. Plasma flows. 

ME 632 Advanced Heat Transfer 

Review of the basic concepts of conduction and radiation. Detailed 
treatment of laminer, turbulent, free and forced convectional flows. Computa- 
tional projects. 

ME 635 Advanced Turbomachinery 

Prerequisite: ME 630. Design and analysis considerations of modern 
turbomachinery. Projects requiring computer-aided analysis and design based 
on recently published information. 

ME 640 Combustion 

Prerequisite: ME 630. Introductory statistical thermodynamics and 
physical properties of gases, chemical reactions in gases, combustion pheno- 
mena, aerodynamics of flames, and detonation phenomena. Design consider- 
ations of combustion chambers and burners, and associated instabilities. 

ME 645 Computational Fluid Dynamics and Heat Transfer 

Prerequisite: ME 630; corequisite: ME 604 or M 620. Current 
methods of computer solutions of the conservation equations of fluid dynamics. 
Viscous, uncompressible, compressible and shocked flows. Real gas equations 
of state. Computer projects. 

ME 660 Advanced Design Philosophies 

Open to advanced students. Seminar series on state-of-the-art 
techniques including objectives and philosophies of design. Guest lectures by 
recognized industnal experts. Complete design project required of all 
students. 

ME 670 Special Topics — Mechanical Engineering 

Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. A study of selected topics 
of particular interest to students and instructor. Course may be taken more 
than once. 

ME 695 Independent Study I 

Prerequisite: permission of program coordinator. Independent study 
under the guidance of an adviser into an area designated by the program 



124 



Management Science 



coordinator. 

ME 696 Independent Study II 

Prerequisite: ME 695. 

ME 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours. Periodic meetings and discussions 
of the individual student's progress in the preparation of a thesis. 

ME 699 Thesis II 

Prerequisite: ME 698. A continuation of ME 698, Thesis I. 



Department of Management Science 

MG 625 Systems Techniques in Business Administration 

An integrated study of the techniques for solving administrative 
problems, including the analysis and improvement of organizational structures, 
office procedures, forms design, records management, reports and equipment 
standards. The conduct of a comprehensive systems survey using these tech- 
niques is explored in depth as are flow charting and the preparation of manuals. 

MG 633 Managerial Economics 

Prerequisites: EC 603-604, QA 604-605. A study of the applica- 
tion of the major tools of economic analysis to the problems encountered by 
management in the organization of the firm. Topics include the theory and 
measurement of consumer demand, measurement and control of costs, the 
effects of public policy upon managerial decisions and pricing techniques and 
the allocation of capital within the firm. 

MG 635 Purchasing and Materials Management 

This course deals with the management of materials and the procure- 
ment function in a business enterprise. The fundamentals auxiliary functions, 
and management of materials activities provide introduction to an increasingly 
specialized field of business administration. 

MG 637 Management 

A study of the functions of management planning, organizing, direc- 
ting, controlling, coordinating. 

MG 638 Cost Benefit Management 

Prerequisites: OA 604, EC 603. This course will provide students 
with an introduction and overview to the field of cost /benefit management. Fun- 
damental theoretical evaluation of cost /benefit of a project will be covered. 
Other topics discussed include: the selection of the best investment criteria, the 
external environmental spillover effects, and the application of cost/benefit 
management in decision making under uncertainty. 

MG 640 Management of Health Care Organizations 

Indentification of the characteristics of health care organizations and 



125 



Course Descriptions 



the dimensions of management in such organizations. Examination and applica- 
tion of the principles of management necessary for the successful operations of 
health care organizations. 

M.B.A. students in the Health Care concentration take MG 640 in place of 
MG 637 in the core. 

MG 641 Contract Administration 

Prerequisite: OA 600 or equivalent. The administrative aspects of 
the contract, modification, evaluation, and sub -contracting. Importance is 
given to value analysis as it affects the contractor and the government. Other 
issues are covered such as financial and pattern rights. 

MG 645 Management of Human Resources 

A study of organizational practices in the management of human 
resources. Manpower planning, recruitment, selection, training, compensation 
and contemporary problems of the field. 

MG 653 Seminar in Managerial Economics 

Prerequisite; MG 633 or permission of the instructor. Application of 
managerial economics to selected problems encountered in management of 
the corporation such as evaluation of costs, returns on alternative investment 
policies and pricing plans. Problems of implementation covered through anal- 
ysis of broad range of cases where uncertainty has major bearing on manager- 
ial decisions. Application and use of economic tools such as forecasting, capital 
investment analysis and risk analysis are part of this structure. 

MG 660 Comparative Management 

Prerequisite: MG 637. The main focus of this course is to develop 
an understanding of managerial practices in different organizations and 
systems. A conceptual framework is developed for the analysis of interaction 
between managerial processes and cultural factors as they affect the manage- 
ment of enterprises in various organizations and systems. 

MG 661 Development of Management Thought 

Prerequisite: MG 637. Study of the literature from various disci- 
plines in order to determine the thinking and practices of leaders of organizations, 
past and present. The historical perspective of management thought will be 
developed. The contributions of religion, philosophy, economics, sociology 
and psychology to management thought and practice will be examined. Em- 
phasis on pioneering works in the management of organizations. Case studies 
of the thinJcing and practices of famous leaders of American business enter- 
prises. 

MG 662 Organization Theory 

Prerequisite: MG 637. A survey of the literature on theories of or- 
ganization with emphasis on contemporary theories. Application of the theories 
to management and organizational problems will be attempted. Difficulties 
arising between theory and practice will be examined. 

MG 663 Leadership in Organizations 

Prerequisite: MG 637. Examination of theories and research findings 
from the behavioral sciences that are relevant to leadership in organizations. 



126 



Management Science 



I'he role of the leader within the organization; the prerequisites, knowledge 
and practices required for successful leadership will be studied. Programs for 
the development of leaders will be explored. 

MG 664 Organizational Effectiveness 

Prerequisite: MG 637. Identification of the criteria necessary for 
developmg and maintaining effective organizations. A study of the concepts 
that may be utilized in the management of these criteria. Approaches that may 
be utilized in developing managers in the use of these concepts will be exam- 
ined and applied to problem situations through cases and role playing. 

MG 665 Wage and Salary Administration 

Prerequisites: MG 645 and EC 635. A study of the compensation 
function in organizations. Establishing wages and salaries, fringe benefits and in- 
centives. 

MG 669 Business Policy and Strategy 

Prerequisites: MG 637 and 3 credit hours of 600-level MG course 
work. Management policies and strategies for the complex organization 
operating m a dynamic environment are examined from the viewpoint of the 
top-level executives of the organization. Develops analytical frameworks for the 
management of numerous elements involved in assuring the fulfillment of the 
goals of the total organization. Integrates the student's general business 
knowledge with the required courses in the M.B.A. program. Emphasis is 
placed on the development of oral and written skills by the examination and 
discussion of cases. 

MG 670 Selected Topics 

A study of selected issues of particular interest to the students and in- 
structor. May be taken more than once. 

MG 675 Readings in Management 

A seminar. Examines the literature in selected areas of management. 

MG 678 Personnel Management Seminar 

Prerequisites: MG 637, MG 645, P 619 & EC 625. A seminar in the 
personnel and manpower management function of the modem work organiza- 
tion. The use of an integrated behavioral, quantitative, and systems approach 
permits an applied multidisciplinary synthesis of the various aggregate man- 
power management subsystems required in the modern work organization. 

MG 679 Industrial Relations Seminar 

Prerequisites: MG 637, P619, EC 625 & EC 687. A seminar in 
industrial relations and the labor -management relations function of the modern 
work organization. The use of an integrated behavioral, economic, and legal 
approach permits an applied multidisciplinary synthesis of the employee rela- 
tions function required in either nonunionized or unionized work organizations. 

MG 680 Current Topics in Business Administration 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours or permission of the instructor. An 
integrative course that will examine the role of business in society and relate 
the business firm to its social, political, legal and economic environment. While 
the exact content of this seminar is expected to vary from semester to semester 



127 



Course Descriptions 



in accordance with the varied academic interests and professional backgrounds 
of different faculty handling the course, the basic theme is the role of the busi- 
ness firm as the "keeper" of the market mechanism and the means for organ- 
izing resources in the economy. 

MG 685 Research Methods in Business Administration 

Designed to familiarize administrators with the tools and poten- 
tialities of social research and to assist them in the presentation, interpretation 
and application of research data. 

MG 690 Research Project 

Prerequisite; 15 graduate hours or permission of the instructor. 
Independent study under the supervision of an adviser. 

MG 695 Independent Study I 

A planned program of individual study under the supervision of a 
member of the faculty. 

MG 696 Independent Study II 

Prerequisite: MG 695. 

MG698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours. Periodic meetings and discussions 
of the individual student's progress in the preparation of a thesis. 

MG 699 Thesis II 

Prerequisite: MG 698. A continuation of MG 698, Thesis I. 



Department of Marketing 

MK 609 Marketing 

Prerequisites: EC 603-604. An intensive study of modern marketing 
fundamentals, a study of the decision -making problems encountered by the 
markehng executive and the relation of marketing to environmental forces. 

MK 616 Analysis of Buyer Behavior 

Prerequisite: MIC 609. An examination of the principal comprehen- 
sive household and organizational buyer behavior models and the behavioral 
science theories upon which such applied models are based. The buyer is an- 
alyzed at the individual level, at the social level and at the organizational level. 

MK 639 Marketing Research and Information Systems 

Prerequisites: MK 609, OA 605. A managerial approach to mar- 
keting information flow, including recognition of information needs and an 
overview of marketing research as part of an information system. Special 
attention to evaluation of research design and measurement methods, effec- 
tive utilization of research output, and problems encountered in establishing a 
marketing information system. 



128 



Marketing 



MK 641 Marketing Management 

Prerequisite: MK 609. The treatment of the basic decision problems 
of marketing management in terms of a conceptual framework for analysis. 
Consideration of the role played by human judgments and the mathematical 
tools available to aid in these judgments in a number of marketing areas, 
notably market analysis, pricing decisions, advertising decisions, promotional 
decisions and selection of distribution channels. 

MK 643 Product Management 

Prerequisite: MK 609. The search for new product ideas and their 
evaluation; the organization structure necessary to the development and intro- 
duction of new products and the management of a product line; the commer- 
cial aspects of product design, packaging, labeling and branding; consider- 
ations involved in making product deletion decisions; and the social and 
economic effects of managing product innovation. 

MK 644 Consumerism 

Prerequisite: MK 609. An analysis of the evolution of the consum- 
erist movement; how and why it has developed; government agencies dealing 
with consumer problems; the impact of various market structures on the con- 
sumer; the impact of consumer -oriented legislation on marketing strategies; 
and the responsibility of business to the consumer and to society. 

MK 645 Distribution Strategy 

Prerequisite: MK 609. Analysis of channel strategies; theory and 
economic justification of distribution channels; direct and indirect methods of 
control; behavioral states of channel members; costing the channel; and man- 
agement of changes in distribution. 

MK 670 Selected Topics 

A study of selected issues of particular interest to the students and in- 
structor. May be taken more than once. 

MK 680 Marketing Workshop 

This course is centered around a structural model of a business firm. 
The major objective is to provide the student with an opportunity to develop 
managenal insights and skills in dealing with marketing problems in a competi- 
tive environment. Each of the participants is grouped into decision -making 
units (companies) and assumes the role of a marketing executive operating a 
business firm. These executives will be responsible for planning, organizing, 
staffing, directing and controlling their firm's resources. 

MK 690 Research Project 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours and permission of the instructor. 
Independent study under the supervision of an adviser. 

MK 692 Readings in Marketing 

MK 695 Independent Study I 

A planned program of individual study under the supervision of a 
member of the faculty. 



129 



Course Descriptions 



MK 696 Independent Study II 

Prerequisite: MK 695. 

MK698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: 15 qraduate hours. Periodic meetings and discussions 
of the individual student's progress in the preparation of a thesis. 

MK 699 Thesis II 

Prerequisite: MK 698. A continuation of MK 698, Thesis I. 



Department of Psychology 

P 605 Survey of Community Psychology 

An examination of historical roots and current concepts. A social - 
problems approach to psychological dysfunction. Changing professional roles. 
Community organization and human service delivery; strategies of intervention 
and community change. 

P 607 Special Problems in Community Psychology 

Theory and practice of community psychology with selected prob- 
lems, populations and settings. Emphasis on community psychology service 
issues and problems m the Connecticut area. 

P 609 Research Methods 

Introduction to analytic concepts pertinent to sampling techniques, re- 
search design, variable control and criterion definition. Basic problems of 
measurement, research paradigms, sources of error in research interpretation, 
problems of variable identification and control, and consideration of the logic 
of inference. 

P 610 Program Evaluation in Community Psychology 

Prerequisite: P 609. A systematic study of the processes involved in 
planning, implementing and evaluating social service programs. The focus is 
on action research strategies which integrate the entire process from planning 
and grant application to the evaluation of the program. 

Field Experience and Practicum Seminars 

An apprenticeship or on-the-job role in an ongoing program or center. 
Emphasis on developing conceptualizations and insights as a result of involve- 
ment m the apprenticeship. Placement at a field site for 8 to 10 hours per week. 
Weekly class meetings serve two purposes: to present specific theoretical 
matenal and research findings appropriate to each seminar, and to allow stu- 
dents to discuss their field training experiences. 

P 6 1 1 Field Experience & Practicum Seminar I: The Dyadic Relationship 

Content focuses upon one-to-one relationships in community psychol- 
ogy. See general description above. 

130 



Psychology 



P 6 1 2 Field Experience & Practicum Seminar II: Models of Consultation 

Content focuses upon community consultation. See general description 
above. 

P 613 Field Experience & Practicum Seminar III: Systems Intervention 

Content focuses upon intervention into and change in community 
systems. See general description above. 



P 618 Community Mental Health Philosophy and Concepts 

Considerations of the philosophical bases which underlie traditional 
approaches to mental health. A study of the implied cultural values and attitudes 
which have determined the locations, the settings, the methods and the objec- 
tives of mental health treatment concepts, programs and techniques. 

P 619 Organizational Behavior 

Analysis of various theories of business and managerial behavior em- 
phasizing the business organization and its internal processes. Psychological 
factors in business and industry, including motivation, incentives and conflict. 
A study of research findings relevant to an understanding and prediction of 
human behavior in organization. 

P 620 Industrial Psychology 

Psychological theories and research applied to business and other 
organizations. Problems and methods in selection and placement, training, 
performance appraisal, motivation and leadership. 

P 62 1 Behavior Modification 

Theory and research in behavior modification. Aversive learning, 
desensitization, operant conditioning. Applications in clinical and nonclinical 
settings. 

P 623 Psychology of the Small Group 

Analyses of the behavior and interaction of people in mutual gratifi- 
cation groups, committees, work groups and clubs. 

P 625 Advanced Psychology of Human Development 

In-depth exploration of development through the life cycle and the 
developmental impact of family, neighborhood, schools, work, class, race, 
sex, etc.; key theoretical concepts; research findings; community intervention. 

P 627 Attitude and Opinion Measurement 

Prerequisite: P 609. Examination of modem methods of attitude and 
opinion measurement. Scale, schedule, and interview formats. Respondent 
sets. Consideration of sampling problems. 

P 628 The Interview 

The interview as a tool for information gathering, diagnoses, mutual 
decision making and behavior change. Use of role playing provides the stu- 
dent with insights into nuances of interpersonal relationships. Applications to 
selection, counseling and other situations. 

P 629 Introduction to Counseling 

The roles of the client and the counselor in the counseling relation. 



131 



Course Descriptions 



Examination of underlying assumptions. 

P 630 Psychology of Personality 

Major personality theories and their implications. Examination of the 
psychological and organic factors involved in personality development and 
expression. 

P 63 1 Social Psychology 

Current problems in social psychology. Attitude scale construction, 
attitude change, language as a social phenomenon, patterns of culture, social 
class, groups, person perception and conformity. 

P 632 Group Dynamics and Group Treatment 

An exploration of the emerging area of group dynamics. The structure 
of groups, their development, process interaction analysis, formal and informal 
groups, group psychotherapy and sensitivity framing. 

P 633 Problems of Drug Abuse 

Discussion of selected issues and current problems m drug abuse. 

P 634 Personality Assessment 

Prerequisite: P 609. A critical survey of the theories and issues of per- 
sonality assessment. Topics include intelligence, achievement and ability assess- 
ment. Personality tests and ethical questions associated with psychological 
testing . 

P 635 Assessment of Human Performance with Standardized Tests 

Prerequisite: P 609. Theories, assumptions and constraints underlying 
construction and application of standardized tests employed in clinical, educa- 
tional, governmental and industrial settings. Emphasis on selection of appro- 
priate standardized tests for specific applications. 

P 636 Abnormal Psychology 

Etiological factors in psychopathology dynamics and classification of 
neuroses, psychophysiologic conditions, psychoses, personality disorders, 
organic illness, retardation and childhood diseases. 

P 638 Psychology of Communication and Opinion Change 

Characteristics of the source, the situation, and content of messages, 
along with other variables influencing attitudinal modification. Cognitive factors 
and social settings in attitude change. 

P 640 Industrial Motivation and Morale 

Prerequisite: P 6 1 9. The meaning of work; theories of motivation. Stim- 
ulus deprivation and expectation of reinforcement; job satisfaction and moti- 
vation; pay as an incentive; interventions to increase work motivation. Case 
studies. 

P 642 Organizational Change and Development 

Prerequisite: P619. The nature of organization development, inter- 
vention by third -party consultation, change in organization structure and role 
relationships, managerial gnd, participation, conformity and deviation. 



132 



Psychology 



P 645 Seminar in Organizational/Industrial Psychology 

Prerequisite: P 619 and P 609. An examination of the relationship be- 
tween molar human behavior and the sociophysical settings in which it occurs. 
Human behaviors are conceptualized as adaptive responses to environmental 
systems that provide their contexts. Particular emphasis will be placed on the 
ecological match between human service organizations and their clients. Class 
seminars will alternate with on-site study of human service agencies. 

P 650 Ecological Psychology 

An in-depth study of the relationship between molar human behavior 
and the sociophysical settings m which it occurs. Human behaviors are con- 
ceptualized as adaptive responses to environmental systems that provide their 
contexts. Particular emphasis will be placed on the ecological match between 
human service organizations and their clients. Class seminars will alternate 
with on-site study of human service agencies. 

P 660 Contemporary Issues in Organizational/Industrial Psychology 

Prerequisite: 12 hours in psychology or consent of the instructor. In- 
depth investigation of topical areas of concern in organizational/industrial 
psychology. Topics may include, but are not limited to, the impact of EEOC 
regulations on selection and promotion; assessment centers; the role of the 
consultant in organizations; flex -time, day care, and other strategies to accom- 
modate family needs of employees; stress in work settings; women in manage- 
ment. Content will be stated at the time the course is scheduled. Students may 
petition for a particular topic they feel would fit their academic goals. May be 
taken twice. 

P 670 Selected Topics 

A study of selected issues of particular interest to the students and in- 
structor. May be taken more than once. 

P 672 Psychology of the Middle and Later Years 

A comprehensive consideration of the psychological aspects of the 
aging process. Sensation, perception, cognition, intelligence, problem solving, 
memory and sexuality, personality changes. Disengagement, rigidity. Death 
and its anticipation. 

P 678 Practicum I 

For students already employed in a managerial or supervisory role. A 
job-related research project is carried out under faculty supervision. 

P 679 Practicum II 

Prerequisite: P 678. 

P 693 Organizational Internship I 

For students without experience at the managerial or supervisory level. 
Under faculty supervision, the student engages in field experience m an indus- 
trial setting. 

P 694 Organizational Internship II 

Prerequisite: P 693. 



133 



Course Descriptions 



P 695 Individual Intensive Study I 

Prerequisite: completion of required courses or 24 graduate hours and 
written approval of department chairman. Provides the graduate student with 
the opportunity to delve more deeply into a particular area of study under 
faculty supervision. 

P 696 Individual Intensive Study II 

Prerequisite: P 695. 

P 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: completion of all required courses or 24 graduate hours 
and written approval of departmental chairman. Periodic meetings and discus- 
sions of the individual student's progress m the preparation of a thesis. 

P 699 Thesis II 

Prerequisites: P 698, written approval of departmental chairman. A 
continuation of P 698, Thesis I. 



Department of Public Administration 

PA 601 Principles of Public Administration 

The development, organization, functions and problems of national, 
state and local governmental administration. 

PA 602 Public Policy Formulation and Implementation 

Recommended prerequisites: PA 601, EC 608, PA 604, PA 611. 
The relationship between public administration and the formulation of public 
policy is studied. The implementation of public policy by administrators based 
on the politics of the administrator is examined in terms of interaction between 
various group representatives, i.e., the legislators, the politician, and pressure 
group leaders. 

PA 604 Seminar in Communities and Social Change 

Interactions among the community as a social organization and edu- 
cation, police and welfare institutions within it; special attention to conceptual 
frameworks and current research or action programs that particularly affect 
minority groups. 

PA 611 Research Methods in Public Administration 

Designed to familiarize administrators with the tools and potentialities 
of social research, and to assist them in the presentation, interpretation and 
application of research data. 

PA 620 Personnel Administration and Collective Bargaining in the 
Public Sector 

Recommended prerequisites: PA 601, EC 608, PA 604, PA 611. 
Study of the civil service systems in the United States and the state governments, 
including a systematic review of the methods of recruitment, promotion, disci- 



134 



Public Administrahon 



pline, control and removal. 

Explores the effects on work relationships of collective bargaining 
statutes which have been adopted by legislatures. Emphasis is placed on Con- 
necticut's collective bargaining statutes. 

PA 625 Administrative Behavior 

Recommended prereguisites: PA 601, EC 608, PA 604, PA 611. 
The problems faced by an administrator m dealing with interpersonal relation- 
ships and human processes. Analysis of individual and group behavior in 
various governmental and business settings to determine the administrative 
action for the promotion of desired work performance. Emphasis given to the 
public sector. Participation in actual problem situation discussions and case 
studies. 

PA 630 Governmental Accounting 

Recommended prereguisites: PA 601, EC 608. A comprehensive 
survey of the essential principles of governmental accounting, budgeting, cost 
accounting, and financial reporting. The various operating funds, bonded debt, 
fixed assets, investments, classification of revenue and expenditures, general 
property taxes and mterfund relationships. 

PA 632 Public Finance and Budgeting 

Recommended prerequisites: PA 601, EC 608, PA 604. State and 
local expenditure patterns, state and local revenue sources, income taxation at 
the state and local level, excise taxation, sales taxation, taxation of capital and 
the property tax. Emphasis on fiscal and economic aspects of federalism and 
federal -state fiscal coordination. The role of the budget m the determination of 
policy, m administrative integration, in control of government operations. 

PA 634 Problems of Municipal Management 

Recommended prerequisites: PA 601, EC 608, PA 604. Study of 
selected problems of city management with emphasis on "housekeeping" and 
line operations. 

PA 635 Statistics for Public Administrators 

Provides a basic theoretical treatment of the nature of statistical anal- 
ysis and its role m economic research design and procedure. 

PA 639 Seminar in Public Sector Procurement 

General policy and regulatory aspects; contracting; organizing for 
procurement and materials management; managing and controlling the pro- 
curement process; and innovations in public procurement. 

PA 640 Purchasing 

Current innovative techniques used in purchasing. Emphasis on 
warehousing, storage, inventory control and cooperative purchasing plans. 

PA 641 Institutional Budgeting 

Recommended prerequisites: PA 601, EC 608. Budgeting as an 
institutional planning tool, as a cost control device and as a program analysis 
mechanism. Attention is given to the salary expense budget, the revenue bud- 
get, the capital budget and the cash budget. 



135 



Course Descriptions 



PA 642 Health Care Delivery Systems 

This course deals with a comparative analysis of health care delivery 
systems and the application of systems analysis and design concepts for de- 
signing and evaluating health care delivery systems. 

PA 643 Health and Institutional Planning 

Designed to develop skills and understanding of the dynamics of 
health and social planning processes with respect to consumer demand, na- 
tional and local health goals and the optional location of facilities, services and 
manpower. 

PA 644 Administration of Programs and Services for the Aged 

The structure, function and properties of publicly and privately fund- 
ed programs and service organizations providing health services to the aged. 
The economic, political, legal and social issues which affect the administration 
of human service organizations will be studied, with emphasis on administration 
of health care services. 

PA 645 Health Care Economics and Finance 

Recommended prerequisite: PA 641. This course integrates the ac- 
counting, economics, finance, budgeting, and health insurance principles, 
concepts and analytical tools which are essential to the decision -making pro- 
cesses of health care organizations. 

PA 647 Zoning and Land Subdivision Regulation 

Recommended prerequisite; PA 660. Ordinance structure and plan- 
ning theory as expressed in texts of ordinances. Selected court cases. 

PA 650 Administrative Law 

A search for principles and criteria against which public interest can 
be balanced with private right in the changing patterns of government, with 
particular reference to the American system. 

PA 660 Urban Planning: Theory and Practice 

Recommended prerequisites: PA 601, EC 608, PA 604, PA 611. 
Explores the concept of physical planning withm the urban developmental 
framework. The function of planning in its relationship to the environment. 
Comprehensive planning with its many ramifications involving the various 
sections of our society. Methods for analyzing problems as well as design meth- 
ods for problem solving. 

PA 661 Problems of Metropolitan Areas 

Analysis of the problems of government and administration arising 
from the population patterns and physical and social structures of contemporary 
metropolitan communities. 

PA 662 Environmental Design 

A nontechnical introduction to the physical sciences of ecology and 
the principle areas of pollution. Industry problems of pollution control and 
effects of recent legislation will be explored to show how decisions of society 
affect our environment. 



136 



Public Administration 



PA 663 Urban Housing 

Encompassed are the subjects of housing management, planning, 
finance and policy. Specific topics such as the provision of low -income housing,' 
the use of mortgage insurance, interest subsidies, site planning, rent controls! 
code enforcement, mortgage markets, and the rise of housing abandonment 
are stressed. 

PA 670 Selected Topics 

A study of selected issues of particular interest to the students and in- 
structor. May be taken more than once. 

PA 671 Administrative Problems 

Exploration of the practical experiences and problem -solving situa- 
tions in the day-to-day activities of a public administrator. 

PA 680 Seminar in Public Administration 

Recommended prerequisites: PA 601, EC 608, PA 604, PA 611. 
Exact material to be covered will be announced. 

PA 690 Research Project I 

Prerequisites: 15 graduate hours, permission of the public adminis- 
tration graduate program coordinator. Independent study for advanced grad- 
uate students on selected problems in public administration. 

PA 691 Research Project II 

Prerequisites: 1 5 graduate hours, permission of the public adminis- 
tration graduate program coordinator. Independent study for advanced grad- 
uate students on selected problems m public administration. 

PA 692 Readings in Public Administration 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours or permission of the instructor. 

PA 693 Public Administration Internship 

Prerequisites: 15 graduate hours, permission of the public adminis- 
tration graduate program coordinator. A supervised work experience m a 
cooperating public service agency. Students must be available for at least one 
day per week. 

PA 695 Independent Study I 

A planned program of individual study under the supervision of a 
member of the faculty. 

PA 696 Independent Study II 

Prerequisite: PA 695, Independent Study I. 

PA 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: 1 5 graduate hours. Periodic meetings and discussion of 
the individual student's progress in the preparation of a thesis. 

PA 699 Thesis II 

Prerequisite: PA 698, Thesis I. 



137 



Course Descriptions 



Department of Physics 

PH 680 Special Topics - Physics 

Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. A study of selected topics 
of particular interest to students and instructor. Course may be taken more 
than once. 



Department of Political Science 

PS 601 Constitutional Law 

A study of the relation of the judicial process and constitutional law 
to the political process in the United States. Judicial review, federalism and 
separation and delegation of powers. 

PS 602 Civil Liberties and Rights 

An analysis of civil liberties, civil nghts, due process, and equal pro- 
tection of the law. An examination of the role of the public official in the protec- 
tion, denial or abridgement of the constitutional and legal rights of individuals. 

PS 603 International Law 

A study of the role of international law in the modern state system with 
particular reference to individuals; territorial jurisdiction; law of the sea, air and 
space; and the development of law through international organizations. 

PS 605 Criminal Law 

Scope, purpose, definition and classification of criminal law. Offense 
against the person; habitation and occupancy. Offenses against property and 
other offenses. Special defenses. Emphasis on the Connecticut penal code. 

PS 608 The Legislative Process 

An analysis of the legislati-ve process in the American political system. 
Stress will be placed on legislative politics m state and local government. 
Among areas covered will be legislative functions, selection and recruitment of 
legislative candidates, legislative role orientations, the legislative socialization 
process, the committee system, the legislators and their constituencies, legisla- 
tive lobbyists, legislative decision making, legislative -executive relations and 
legislative organization and procedures. 

PS 616 Urban Government and Politics 

An examination of the urban political system. Stress will be placed on 
the political aspects of urban government structures. Among the areas covered 
will be formal and informal decision making in urban government, community 
power structures, types of urban government structures, the politics of inter- 
governmental relations and the politics of servicing the urban environment 
(social services, planning agencies, education, housing, transportation, health, 
pollution control and ecology, revenue sharing, public safety, neighborhood 
corporations, etc.). 



138 



Physics/Political Science 



PS 626 Decision Making in the Political Process 

An in-depth study of decision making in the American system with 
special emphasis upon the various types of mechanisms, i.e., executive, legisla- 
tive, judicial, bureaucratic, organizational and military. The influence of intelli- 
gence, economic and psychological factors and social pressures upon decisions 
and decision makers will be examined. 

PS 628 Change and Government 

A study of the major processes of change and their conseguences for 
the functioning of government. The course will concentrate upon changes that 
may occur through violence, evolution or technology, and which may alter the 
effective operation of government. 

PS 633 The Political Process and the Aged 

A study of the political process as it relates to the aged. Governmental 
decision making on federal, state and local levels including legislation and its 
implications. 

PS 635 Law and Public Health 

A course for the civil servant or health professional concerned with 
the laws relating to the public health at the federal, state and local level as well 
as the practical administration of those laws. 

PS 641 The Politics of Interdependence 

An examination of the global politico -economic system and the chal- 
lenges facing world diplomacy. Multinational corporations and political struc- 
tures designed to coordinate global policies for the monetary and trade systems, 
international organizations and their impact on third world development, and 
problems facing industrialized nations will be analyzed. 

PS 670 Selected Topics 

A study of selected issues of particular interest to the students and in- 
structor. May be taken more than once. 

PS 695 Independent Study I 

A planned program of individual study under the supervision of a 
member of the faculty. 

PS 696 Independent Study II 

Prereguisite: PS 695. 

PS 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours. Periodic meetings and discussion of 
the individual student's progress in the preparation of a thesis. 

PS 699 Thesis II 

Prerequisite: PS 698. A continuation of PS 698, Thesis I. 



139 



Course Descnptions 



Courses in Quantitative Analysis 
Department of IVIanagement Science 

OA 600 Quantitative Analysis No credit 

Basic mathematics for solving economic and business problems. 
Topics include algebra review, equations and inequalities, graphs, exponential 
and logarithmic functions, an introduction to differential and integral calculus, 
and matrix algebra. 

OA 604 Probability and Statistics 

Prerequisites: QA 600 or 9 hours of quantitative courses. An intro- 
duction to business statistics. Topics include data analysis and presentation, 
frequency distributions, probability theory, probability distributions, decision 
making under uncertainty, sampling and statistical inference, hypothesis test- 
ing, t, X, and F tests. 

OA 605 Advanced Statistics 

Prerequisite: OA 604 or IE 607. A continuation of OA 604. Topics 
include simple regression and correlation, multiple regression, analysis of var- 
iance, index numbers, time series analysis, seasonal and cyclical variations and 
an introduction of forecasting techniques. 

OA 606 Advanced Management Science 

Prerequisites: IE 601, OA 604-605. An examination, from a man- 
agement viewpoint, of the scope of applicability of the methods and models 
developed in IE 60 1 , Introduction to Operations Research/Management Sci- 
ence, and OA 604-605, Probability and Statistics, and Advanced Statistics. 
Topics include parametric programming and economic interpretation of the 
dual LP problem, marginal costs and revenues, shadow pnces, opportunity 
costs, incremental costs, costs of deviation from optimal solution point(s), and 
location or construction of desirable alternate optimal solutions. 

OA 607 Forecasting 

Prerequisite: OA 605 or permission of the instructor. A survey of 
some basic techniques and methods used in forecasting at the level of the firm 
and industry. Topics covered are naive forecasting methods, index numbers, 
types of economic fluctuations, criteria for fitting estimating lines. Gompertz 
curve, arithmetic straight line, parabolic trend, logarithmic straight line, sea- 
sonal variation, economic indicators, simple correlation and regression, multi- 
ple correlation and regression, curvilinear and time series regression. 

OA 670 Selected Topics 

A study of selected issues of particular interest to the students and in- 
structor. May be taken more than once. 

OA 690 Research Project 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours or permission of the instructor. In- 
dependent study under supervision of an adviser. 

OA 695 Independent Study I 

A planned program of individual study under the supervision of a 
member of the 'faculty. 



140 



Quantitative Analysis/Biology, Environmental Studies and General Science 



OA 696 Independent Study II 

Prerequisite: OA 695. 

OA 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite; 15 graduate hours. Penodic meetings and discussions 
of the individual student's progress in the preparation of a thesis. 

OA 699 Thesis II 

Prerequisite: QA 698. A continuation of OA 698, Thesis I. 



Department off Biology, Environmental Studies 
and General Science 



SC 601 Ecology for Environmental Engineers 

An introduction to the biological aspects of environmental problems. 
Includes discussion of the concepts of bioecology, organisms (microorganisms, 
plants, animals) important in pollution control and detection, and human organ 
systems most affected by pollution. 

SC 602 Pollutants and the Aquatic Environment 

Prerequisite: SC601. Discusses the interrelationships among the 
various kinds of pollutants, the morphology of the lake, river, or coastal area, 
and the effects on the individual organism and the ecosystem as a whole. Treat- 
ment methods using organisms are also discussed. 

SC 603 Air Pollution 

Prerequisite: SC 601 . An introduction to air movements in the atmo- 
sphere and their relation to pollutants; the effect of air pollution upon organisms 
with special emphasis on the effects on human beings. 

SC 608 Water Ouality 

Prerequisite: SC 601 or undergraduate biology major. Recognition 
of the organisms and substances of polluted waters; the selection of the ap- 
propriate methods for collection, testing, and analysis of the data. The func- 
tions and interrelations of governmental agencies in controlling water pollu- 
tion. 

SC 610 General Environmental Health 

Prerequisite; SC 601 or undergraduate biology major. Principles of 
public health with general emphasis given to environmental factors such as air 
and water pollutants, legal standards and preventative measures and their rela- 
tionships to public health. 

SC 612 Freshwater and Marine Biology 

Prerequisite; SC 601 or undergraduate biology major. Investigation 
of relationships between aquatic systems and the organisms living in these 
systems. Emphasis placed on the manner in which ecological studies of aquatic 
systems are conducted. 



141 



Course Descriptions 



SC 621 Microbiology 

Prerequisites: SC 301, SC 302, or permission of the instructor. An 
in-depth survey of the groups of microorganisms ranging from the fungi to the 
viruses. Classification, growth, reproduction, metabolism and major impact on 
man will be stressed. Current literature pertinent to each group will be utilized. 

SC 622 Bacteriology 

Prerequisites: SC 301 , SC 302, or permission of the instructor. Study 
of the characteristics basic to classification of bacteria. Group-by-group study 
of bacteria with emphasis on the major detrimental and beneficial contributions 
of each group as they affect man and the environment. Students will be expect- 
ed to survey recent findings in scientific publications. 

SC 642 Physical Aging 

Prerequisite: SC 121 or some undergraduate biology. A study of 
the aging process in man and its effects on the various component systems of 
the body — muscular, skeletal, endocrine, etc.— in health and disease. 

SC 670 Selected Topics 

Prerequisite: 9 graduate hours. A study of selected issues of par- 
ticular interest to the students and instructor. May be taken more than once. 

SC 690 Research Project 

Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. Independent study under 
the supervision of an adviser. 

SC 695 Independent Study I 

A planned program of individual study under the supervision of a 
member of the faculty. 

SC 696 Independent Study II 

Prerequisite: SC 695. 

SC 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours. Periodic meetings and discussions 
of the individual student's progress in the preparation of a thesis. 

SC699 Thesis II 

Prerequisite: SC 698. A continuation of SC 698, Thesis I. 



Courses in Sociology 

Department of Sociology and Social Welfare 



so 601 Minority Group Relations 

An interdisciplinary survey of minority groups in the United States 
with special reference to ethnic, religious and racial factors that influence inter- 
action. 



142 



Sociology and Social Welfare 



SO 605 Culture and Personality 

The effect of different cultures upon personality development. Cul- 
tural mores and norms as vehicles of control. 

SO 607 Delinquency and Juvenile Crime 

A general introduction to the field of delinquency and crime, in- 
cluding all aspects of the social and personal matrix out of which these forms of 
social destructiveness arise. 

SO 608 Criminology 

A survey of the available data and theories relating to the scope and 
nature of the crime problem, characteristics of offenders, and the factors that 
are correlated with crime. Emphasis on social institutions that play significant 
roles in the increase or decrease of criminal activity as it exists in the United 
States and in other cultures. Environmental and personality factors that influ- 
ence criminal behavior. 

SO 609 Comparative Social Organization 

A comparative analysis of social and political organizations in cultures 
of varying complexity. 

SO 610 Urban Sociology 

Prerequisite: PA 604. The problem of urban growth and develop- 
ment. Residential patterns together with the physical development of cities and 
the redevelopment plans. An examination of the people and their relationships 
to the environment. 

SO 620 Sociology of Bureaucracy 

A study of some of the classic conceptualizations of bureaucracy and 
their relevance to the structure and functioning of American economic and 
governmental institutions. The course will be designed to give students infor- 
ational and experiental resources with which they, as planners and managers, 
can improve their abilities to make effective policy decisions. Strongly recom- 
mended for gerontology students. 

SO 631 Population Problems and Human Ecology 

A sociological approach to social demography with attention to pop- 
ulation growth, patterns of distribution of population and the population chan- 
ges and trends. 

SO 635 Sociology of Law 

A study of the social origins and consequences of law and legal pro- 
cesses. Emphasis on problems of legal change and the structure and functioning 
of legal sanctions. Emphasis on law and legal sanctions in other societies, in- 
cluding primitive societies. Major focus on American society. 

SO 641 Death and Suicide 

In-depth analysis of suicide. Traditional theories of suicide are ana- 
lyzed regarding the psychological approach as well as the demographic and 
group analysis of sociology. The goal of the course is both academic and prac- 
tical, stressing community application. Strongly recommended for gerontology 
students. 



143 



Course Descriptions 



SO 651 Social Gerontology 

Basic introduction to the field of gerontology. Discusses the history 
and definition of the field, the contributions of academic disciplines to the field, 
various perceptions of aging, and explores the basic theories, problems and 
prospects of gerontology. Required of all gerontology students. 

SO 652 Seminar in Gerontology 

The seminar will focus on a topic or a series of topics crucial to the 
analysis of the gerontological phenomenon, and will explore interdisciplinary 
techniques and findings. Required of all gerontology students. 

SO 670 Selected Topics 

A study of selected issues of particular interest to the students and in- 
structor. May be taken more than once. 

SO 695 Independent Study I 

A planned program of individual study under the supervision of a 
member of the faculty. 

SO 696 Independent Study II 

Prerequisite: SO 695. 

SO 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: 1 5 graduate hours. Periodic meetings and discussion of 
the individual student's progress m the preparation of a thesis. 

SO 699 Thesis II 

Prerequisite: SO 698. A continuation of SO 698, Thesis I. 



Courses in Social Welfare 

Department of Sociology and Social Welfare 



SW 651 Social Work with the Elderly I: Individuals, Families, Groups 

This course will deal with the problems of aging, focusing particularly 
on the individual and the immediate family. Emphasis will be placed on the role 
of social work in helping the individual and the family to deal with issues of 
discrimination, medical and psychological problems, parent-child conflicts, 
death and dying. 

SW 652 Human Services and the Elderly II: Programs, Planning, 
Policies 

An introduction to the variety of private and public social service 
programs available to the elderly. An attempt will be made to identify gaps 
and propose alternatives for future programming. 



144 



145 



f^ 



!<; f m 




BOARD, 

ADMINISTRATION AND 
FACULTY 

The Board of Governors 



Norman I. Botwinik, Chairman; President, Botwinik Brothers Inc. 

Frederick G. Fischer, Vice Chairman; Partner, Ernst & Ernst 

George R. Tieman, Secretary; Attorney at Law 

Herbert H. Pearce, Assistant Secretary; President, H. Pearce Company 

Henry E. Bartels, President, MRM Industries 

James O- Bensen, Former Resident Manager, Bethlehem Steel Corporation 

Roland M. Bixler, President, J-B-T Instruments Inc. 

Mrs. J. F. Buckman 

Dr. Ann J. Capecelatro 

Norman Christensen, Former President, Sorvall Corporation 

Peter H. Comstock, Chairman of the Board and President, Pratt-Read 

Corporation 
Elizabeth G. Curren, Society Editor, The New Haven Register 
Abbott H. Davis, Jr., Vice President-Residence, The Southern New England 

Telephone Company 



147 



Board, Administration and Faculty 



William S. DeMayo, Partner, Ernst & Ernst 

Robert B. Dodds, Vice Chairman of the Board, Safety Electncal Equipment 

Corporation 
Edward J. Drew, Manager, Quinnipiack Club 
John H. Duffy, Plant Manager, Dome Laboratories, Division of Miles 

Laboratories, Inc. 
Joseph F. Duplinsky, President, Blue Cross & Blue Shield of Connecticut 
John E. Echlin Jr., Account Executive, Bache, Halsey, Stuart, Shields Inc. 
John D. Fassett, President and Chief Executive Officer, United Illuminating 

Company 
John A. Frey, President, Hershey Metal Products Inc. 
Robert M. Gordon, President, Raybestos-Manhattan Inc. 
Daniel Gourash, Day Student, University of New Haven 
Stephen J. Grasso, Evening Student, University of New Haven 
Nathan Hamilton, Attorney at Law 
David Hoffman, Day Student, University of New Haven 
Phillip Kaplan, President, University of New Haven 
George E. Laursen, Vice President - Manufacturing, Health and Beauty 

Division, Chesebrough-Pond's Inc. 
Robert J. Leeney, Editor, The New Haven Register 
Bertrand Mathieu, Professor, University of New Haven 
Ellis C. Maxcy, Former President, The Southern New England Telephone 

Company 
Timothy Mellon, President, Eleven Thirty Inc. 
George I. Mordecai, Secretary-Treasurer, Tyler Chapter Pioneers, The 

Southern New England Telephone Company 
Linda Oliwa, Evening Student, University of New Haven 
Mrs. William F. Robinson Sr., Title IV Consultant, State Department of 

Education 
Shirlee Schaffer, Writer and Commentator, WELI 
Fenmore R. Seton, President, Set on Name Plate Corporation 
Edward D. Taddei, GRI, President, The Barrows and Wallace Company, 

Realtors 
Leon J. Talalay 

Robert M. Totton, Field Underwriter, New York Life Insurance Company 
Philip Turner, Day Student, University of New Haven 
P. Takis Veliotis, General Manager, Electric Boat Division, General 

Dynamics 



148 



Board of Governors 



Doris Werner, Adjunct Professor, University of New Haven 

F. Perry Wilson Jr., Senior Vice President, The First Bank 

Robert F. Wilson, President, Wallace Silversmiths Inc. 

Michael J. Wynne, Assistant Professor, University of New Haven 

Felix Zweig, Professor of Engineering and Applied Science, Yale University 



Standing committees 

Executive Mr. Botwinik, Chairman; Mr. Fischer, Vice Chairman; Mr. Bensen, 
Dr. Capecelatro, Messrs. Davis, Dodds, Gordon, Kaplan, Pearce, Mrs. 
Robinson, Messrs. Talalay, Tiernan, P T. Veliotis, F.P. Wilson, R. Wilson. 

Finance Mr. Fischer, Chairman; Mr. Bensen, Vice Chairman; Messrs. Dodds, 
Duplinsky, Echlin, Kaplan, F.P. Wilson. 

Fund Raising Mr. Bensen, Chairman; Mr. Dodds, Vice Chairman; Mrs. 
Buckman, Messrs. Frey, Kaplan, Mordecai, Pearce, Talalay. 

Nominating Mr. Pearce, Chairman; Messrs. Frey, Kaplan, Mrs. Robinson. 

Personnel Mr. Talalay, Chairman; Mr. Taddei, Vice Chairman; Dr. Capecela- 
tro, Messrs. DeMayo, Kaplan, Totton, F.P. Wilson. 

Special committees 

Buildings and Grounds Mr. Botwinik, Chairman; Mr. Talalay, Vice Chairman; 
Messrs. Drew, Mordecai, Taddei, Dr. Werner, Mr. Zweig. 

Development Mr. Bixler, Chairman; Mr. Maxcy, Vice Chairman; Mrs. Buck- 
man, Messrs. Davis, Mellon, Mrs. Schaffer, Messrs. Taddei, Talalay, Zweig. 

Public and Industrial Relations Mr. Davis, Chairman; Mr. Pearce, Vice 
Chairman; Mr. Comstock, Mrs. Green, Messrs. Drew, Grasso, Hamilton, 
Mrs. Schaffer 



Standing committees of the 
university 

Academic Standing and Admissions, Dr. Sommers, Chairman 

149 



Board, Administration and Faculty- 



Board of Athletic Control, Dr. Sack, Chairman 
Board of Faculty Welfare, Dr. Dmegar, Chairman 
Board of Security Control, Dr. York, Chairman 
Commencement and Convocations, Dr. Reams, Chairman 
Committee on Internal Affairs, Dr. Kaplan, Chairman 
Committee on University Life, Dr. York, Chairman 
Deans' Council, Dr. Sommers, Chairman 
Faculty Senate, Mr. Wynne, Chairman 
Graduate Committee, Dr. Courtney, Chairman 
Library, Dr. Hoffnung, Chairman 
Personnel Policy, Mr. Shattuck, Chairman 
Sabbatical Leave Committee, Dr. Reams, Chairman 
Student Aid and Services, Dr. York, Chairman 
Tenure and Promotion, Dr. Staugaard, Chairman 



Administration 



Office of the President 

Phillip Kaplan, B.A., M,A., Ph.D., President 

Walter O. Jewell III, A. B., Ph.D., Executive Assistant 

Marvin K. Peterson, B.S. m Econ., L.H.D., President Emeritus 

Dalen A. Bowles, Assistant to the Chairman of the Board and to the President 

Mary Mento, Executive Secretary 

Undergraduate admission 

John E. Benevento, B.S., M.S., Director 

Robert A. Campbell, B.A., M.A., Associate Director 

Mary Ann Mikosky, B.S., Admission Counselor 

Patricia A. Hudson, A.S., Admission Counselor 

Lesa Lontts, B.A., Admission Counselor 

Eva Widger, Executive Secretary 

Adele Olivi, Secretary 

Nancy DeMartino, Secretary -Receptionist 



150 



Administration 



Celia DiNello, Secretary 

Patricia DeMaio, Secretary 

Rose lantorno, Terminal Operator 



FINANCIAL AID 

David DuBuisson, B.A., Director 
Phyllis E. Antrum, B.A., Financial Aid Counselor 
Evelyn Sherwood, Secretary 
Beatrice Cordone, Secretary 
' Nancy Virgulto, Secretary 

Athletics 

Athletic Director: Joseph A. Machnik, Ph.D. 
Coordinator of Women's Athletics: Deborah Chin, M.S.P.E. 
Athletic Trainer: Robert Deobil, B.S. 
Director of Athletic Public Relations: Frank Vieira, M.S. 
'Peter Vander Veer, B.S., Sports Information Director 
Leo Pacquette, Equipment Manager 
Margaret Bertolini, Secretary 
Barbara McGill, Secretary 

COACHING AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION STAFF 

Thomas Bell, M.A., Head Coach, Football, Lacrosse 

Deborah Chin, M.S.P.E., Coordinator of Women's Athletics; Head Coach, 

Softball, Volleyball 
Robert Deobil, B.S., Trainer; Head Coach, Track, Cross Country 
William Farrow, M.S., Head Coach, Men's Basketball; Physical Education 
Joseph Machnik, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Physical Education; Director of 

Athletics; Head Coach, Soccer 
Frank Vieira, M.S., Associate Professor of Physical Education; Director of 

Athletic Public Relations; Head Coach, Baseball 
Donald Wynschenk, M.S., Assistant Professor of Physical Education; Director 

of Intramurals; Head Coach, Men's Tennis 
Kevin Breslin, B.S., Assistant Coach, Golf, Hockey 

Part time 



151 



Board, Administration and Faculty- 



Robin Carrera, B.S., Assistant Coach, Football 
John Chernovetz, B.A., Assistant Coach, Football 
Barry Cunningham, B.S., Assistant Coach, Basketball 
Pasquale Elia, M.S., Head Coach, Women's Basketball 
George Jerome, B.S., Assistant Coach, Track 
John Kowalski, B.S., Assistant Coach, Soccer 
Steve Lane, B.A., Head Coach, Golf, Hockey 
Lynn Love, B.A., Head Coach, Women's Tennis 
Jack Maloney, B.S., Assistant Coach, Track 
Dean McKissick, B.S., Assistant Coach, Football 
Kevin Monahan, B.S., Assistant Coach, Football 
Frank Tomaselli, B.S., Assistant Coach, Lacrosse 
Joseph Tonelli, M.S., Assistant Coach, Baseball 
James Vacario, B.S., Assistant Coach, Football 



Development and alumni relations 

John M. Lupton, Director of Development 
Jeanne Perrone, Director of Alumni Relations 
Lucille DeStefano, Executive Secretary 
Janet Seymour, Financial Secretary 
Sara Haddad, Secretary 
Beverly Garville, Secretary 

Handicapped services 

George A. Schaefer, B.S., M.B.A., Coordinator 

Personnel Office 

James H. Shattuck, B.S., B.A., Director 
Georgianne DeMaio, Secretary 



Part time 



152 



Administration 



SERVICES 

Charles Caulfield St., Mail 

David Gralnick, Head Mailman 

Polly MacDiarmid, Switchboard Operator 

Stephanie Magliola, Head Switchboard Operator 

Irene Perry, Receptionist 

* Dolores Board, Switchboard Operator 

* Earl Walker, Mail 



Public relations 

Scott W. Tilden, B.S., M.A., Director 

Dolores D'Agostino, B.A,, Administrative Assistant to the Director 

Elizabeth T. Bennett, B.A., Director of Advertising 

William P. Lazarus, B.A., M.A., A.B.D., Director of the News Bureau 

Security 

Donald R. Scott, Director 

Richard D. Baker, Assistant to the Director 

Eldridge Hatcher, Security Supervisor 

Arcadio Rodriguez, Security Supervisor 

John A. Amato, Security Officer 

Arthur P. Sheehan, Security Officer 

Oscar J. Stanley, Security Officer 

John B. Walton, Guard and Dispatcher 

Ronald D. Whittaby, Security Officer 
' Nestore Delmonte, Guard 
' Theodore Kastancuk, Guard and Dispatcher 
' Rosemarie Giannotti, Secretary 
' Dorothy Kyles, Guard 
'Douglas K. Jordan, Guard 



' Part time 



153 



Board, Administration and Faculty 



Academic administration 



Office of the Provost 

Alexis N. Sommere, B.M.E., M.S., Ph.D., Provost 

B. Badri Saleeby, B.S.M.E.,M.S.M.E.,Ph.D., Associate Dean for University 

of New Haven at New London 
George A. Schaefer, B.S., M.B.A., Associate Dean for Administration 
Christian F. Poulson, B.A., M.B.A., Director of Student Affairs, University of 

New Haven at New London 
Marion I. DePalma, Executive Secretary 

School of Arts and Sciences 

Franz B. Gross, M.A., Ph.D., Dean 

Ralf E. Carriuolo, B.S., M.M., Ph.D., Chairman of Humanities 

Kee W. Chun, A.B., A.M., Ph.D., Chairman of Physics 

Dennis Courtney, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Chairman of Psychology 

Peter J. Desio, B.S., Ph.D., Chairman of Chemistry 

Caroline Dinegar, B.A.,M.A.,Ph.D., Chairman of Political Science 

Bruce A. French, B.S., M.A., Coordinator of Foreign Languages 

Thomas Katsaros, B.A., M.B.A., Ph.D., Chairman of History 

Paul Marx, B.A., M.F.A., Ph.D., Chairman of English 

Elizabeth I. Moffitt, B.F.A.,M.A., Chairman of Fine Arts 

H. Fessenden Wright, A.B., M.S., Ph.D., Chairman of Science and Biology 

Donald Wynschenk, B.S., M.S., Chairman of Physical Education 

Genevieve Lysak, Secretary 

Margaret Bertolini, Faculty Secretary, Chemistry & Physics 

Lucille Faccadio, Faculty Secretary, Political Science 

Betty Bucar, Faculty Secretary, English 
' Louise Allen, Faculty Secretary, Art & Music 
' Cornelia Mas, Faculty Secretary, History 
'Diane Jackson, Faculty Secretary, Sociology 



Part time 



154 



Administration 

School of Business Administration 

Warren Smith, B.A., M.B.A., Dean 

Gene F. Brady, B.S.,B.A.,Ph.D., Chairman of Marketing 

John R. Coleman, B.S.E., M.S. I.E., Ph.D., Chairman of Hotel Management, 

Tourism and Travel 
Wilfred Harricharan, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Chairman of Managment Science 
Kenneth P. Fox, B. A., Ph.D., Chairman of Public Administration 
Marilou McLaughlin, B.A , M.A., Ph.D., Chairman of Communication 
John Teluk, B.S., M.S., Chairman of Economics 

Jeffrey L. Williams, B.S., M.B.A.; C.P.A., CM. A.; Chairman of Accounting 
Collette Foley, Executive Secretary 
Lois Anderson, Faculty Secretary 
Dorothy Berman, Faculty Secretary 
Clarador Feldman, Faculty Secretary 
Eleanor Roppo, Faculty Secretary 

DIVISION OF CRIMINAL JUSTICE 

Richard E. Farmer, A.B., M.S., Ed.D., Director 

Lynn Hunt Monahan, B.A., M.A.,Ph.D., Administrative Assistant to the 

Director 
Henry C. Lee, B.A., B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Director of Forensic Science 
Kathleen D. Allard, Executive Secretary 
Anne B. Callahan, Faculty Secretary 

School of Engineering 

Konstantine C. Lambrakis, B.S.E.E., M.S.M.E., Ph.D., Dean 

William S. Gere Jr., B.S.M.E,, M.E.I.E., M.S., Ph.D., Chairman of Industrial 

Engineering 
Richard J. Greet, B.E.E., M.S.M.E., Ph.D., Chairman of Mechanical and Mate- 
rials Engineering 
Gerald J. Kirwin, B.S.E.E., M.S.E.E., Ph.D., Chairman of Electrical Engineering 
Ross M. Lanius Jr., B.S.C.E., M.S.C.E., Chairman of Civil and Environmental 

Engineering 
Viola Dunnigan, Executive Secretary 



155 



Board, Administration and Faculty- 



Irene Asprelli, Faculty Secretary 
Mana DeLise, Faculty Secretary 
Veronica Miller, Faculty Secretary 
Lucille Lamberti, Faculty Secretary 

Graduate School 

Gwendolyn E. Jensen, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Dean 
David Paelet, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Associate Dean 
Gilbert L. Whiteman, B.Ed., M.A., Ph.D., Associate Dean; Director, Executive 

Master of Business Administration program 
Dorothy J. Martin, Executive Secretary 
Mary Boeger, Admission Secretary 
Linda Carlone, Secretary 
Bethanne Gentile, Secretary -Receptionist 
Allena T. MacDougall, Secretary 
Doris Baldwin, Admission Secretary 
Natalie Grotty, Receptionist for the University of New Haven at Danbury 

School of Professional Studies and 
Continuing Education 

Ahmed R. Mandour, B.A., M.B.A., Ph.D., Dean 
Irene North, Executive Secretary 

DIVISION OF EVENING STUDIES 

Richard M. Lipp, B.S., M.B.A., Associate Dean 
Delma Heuffman, Secretary 
Florence Poppendick, Registration Secretary 
Carol Pfenninger, Secretary -Receptionist 
Patricia Roxby, Secretary -Receptionist 

DIVISION OF CONTINUING EDUCATION 

Muriel Mac Kay, A.S., Assistant Director 



'Part time 



156 



Administration 



SPECIAL STUDIES 

* L. Claire Cappiello, Secretary 

MANAGEMENT CENTER 

Richard M. Lipp, B.S., M.B.A., Acting Director 

Library 

Samuel M. Baker Jr., B.A., B.S., M.A., University Librarian 
Edith C. Lissey, Administrative Assistant to University Librarian 

Dorothy S. Lockrow, B.A., M.A., Associate University Librarian 

Sharon Stevens, B.A., M.S., Assistant Librarian: Technical Services 
Lorraine C. Burke, Library Clerk: Technical Services 
Jane Joseph, Library Clerk: Technical Services 
Elizabeth Kuchinski, Assistant to Catalog Librarian 
Annette Greenhouse, Library Clerk: Technical Services 
Patricia Taylor, Library Clerk: Technical Services 
Charles E. Kratz Jr., B.A., M.A., M.L.S., Head, Public Services 
Lillian B. Goldsmith, Assistant to Circulation Librarian 
Kathleen Fanning, Library Clerk: Public Services 
Charlene Shortell, Library Clerk: Public Services 
Carol Depgen, Library Clerk: Public Services 
Jessie Delehanty, Library Clerk: Public Services 

Eric W. Johnson, B.S., M.S., Serials/Reference Librarian 
Barbara B. Caine, Library Clerk: Public Services 

Carol M. Marker, B.A., M.L.S., Documents/Reference Librarian 

* Marie Keenan, Library Clerk 

* Joanna Krol, Library Clerk 

* Marie Miller, Library Clerk 

* Mary arm H. Dinneen, Library Clerk 

* Rosemary Platz, Library Clerk 

* Ann Thompson, Library Clerk 

* Anna L. Hohl, Library Clerk 
'Joyce C. McVey, Library Clerk 



Part time 



157 



Board, Administration and Faculty 

Student Records 

Joseph Macionus, B.S., M.RA., Registrar 

Virginia Klump, Assistant Registrar 

Frank A. S. Elliott, B.S., Systems Analyst for Student Records 

Mary Burdick, Recorder, Undergraduate Records 

Helen Carey, Transfer Credit Analyst 

Ann Chernick, Secretary 

Audrey Kurshner, Terminal Operator 

Ellen Leuzzi, Secretary to the Registrar 

Marjorie Manfreda, Recorder, Graduate Records 

* Annabelle D'Amicis, Secretary 

* Kathryn Tuttle, Secretary 

Business and Financial 
Administration 



TREASURER'S OFFICE 

Frank G. Hull, B.S., Treasurer of the University 
Frank Clifford, B.S., M.B.A., Assistant to the Treasurer 
Elsie Calandro, Secretary 

BUSINESS OFFICE 

Olga C. Griffeth, A.B., Director, Secretary of the University 

Frank Clifford, B.S., M.B.A., Bursar 

Mary Lou D'Addio, Accounts Receivable 

Julie Hylwa, Accounts Receivable 

Frances MacMillan, Accounts Receivable 

Marjorie Deobil, Accounting Supervisor 

Lois Earles, Payroll 

Rose King, Accounts Payable 

Anne Loin, Accounts Payable 
' Helene Fillmore, Accounts Receivable 
' Lois Ucas, Accounts Receivable 

* Part time 

158 



Administration 



COMPUTER CENTER 

Edward T. George, B.S., M.S., D. Engr., Director 
Thomas Glaring, Production Technician 
Susan Hung, B.A., M.S., Systems Analyst Programmer 
Gynthia Kranyik, B.A., M.S., Academic Operations 
Christopher Morgan, A.S., Analyst Programmer 
Raymond Pulaski, B.S., M.S., Manager, Computer Operations 
Salvatore Votto Jr., B.S., Administrative Systems 
Mark Weber, B.S., Systems Analyst Programmer 
Roberta G Peccerillo, Secretary 
' Robert Schuster, Computer Operator 

PROCUREMENT, BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

R.D. Byard, M.B.A, GPM., Director 

Theodore F. Kunkel, B.S., M.B.A. , Assistant to the Director 

Helen Rothfuss, Executive Secretary 

Anastasia Avgerinos, Administrative Aide 

Harry Florentine, Supervisor of Maintenance 

Reno Mercado, Supervisor of Custodians 

Jean Pierre-Michel, Assistant Supervisor of Custodians 

Sam Craft, Assistant Supervisor of Maintenance 

Donald Wright, Assistant Supervisor of Maintenance (North Campus) 

Anthony Ortiz, Receiving and Inventory Clerk 

Maureen Chase, Executive Secretary 

Pauline Downing, Central Duplicating Service 

Joseph Palumbo, Assistant Receiving Clerk 

Mary Yurczyk, Clerical and Central Duplicating Service 



Student Affairs Administration 



Office of the Dean 

Michael W. York, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Acting Dean 
Dorothy I. Levitsky, Executive Secretary 

'Part time 



159 



Board, Administration and Faculty 

a 

Career Development 

Charles A. Bove, B.A., M.A., Director 
Marlene Wajnowski, Secretary 

Counseling 

Michael W. York, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Director 

George H. Davis, B.A., M.S., Ph.D., Acting Director, 1978-79 

Marilyn Eichler, B.A., M.S., Ph.D., Counselor 

Ann Massini, Secretary 

Day Student Government 

Clarice Sorcinnelli, Secretary 

Housing and Health 

Theodore Kunkel, B.A., M.B.A., Director 
Sheila Wade, B.A., Rathskellar Manager 
Jon M. Fessel, M.D., University Physician 
Eileen A. Quinn, R.N., Head University Nurse 
Doreen S. Griffith, Secretary 
Lillian A. Traub, R.N., University Nurse 

International Students 

Bruce A. French, B.A., M.A., Adviser 

Minority Student Affairs 

Peter A. Rogers, B.S., Director 



' Part time 



160 



Veterans' Affairs 

George A. Schaefer, B.S., M.B.A., Coordinator 
Beatrice Cordone, Secretary 



Faculty 



Faculty 



Faculty Organization 

GENERAL COMMITTEE 

Chairman of the Faculty 

Secretary of the Faculty 

Vice Chairman of the Faculty Senate 

Chairman of the Board of Faculty Welfare 

Vice Chairman of the Board of Faculty Welfare 

Secretary of the Board of Faculty Welfare 



Michael J. Wynne 

Donald M.Smith 

Michael J. Wynne 

Caroline A. Dinegar 

Burton C Staugaard 

PeterJ.Desio 



Faculty Senate 

Chairman 

Vice Chairman 

Secretary 

Chairmen of Senate Committees: 

Academic Standards 

Budget and Development 

Commencement and Convocations 

Curriculum 

Faculty -Student Relations 

Graduate 

Instruction 

Library 



Mchael J. Wynne 

Michael J. Wynne 

Donald M.Smith 

Steven A. Raucher 

Joseph Chepaitis 

Dinwiddle C Reams 

Michael J. Wynne 

Donald Wynschenk 

Dennis Courtney 

Ira H. Kleinfeld 

Robert J. Hoffnung 



161 



Board, Administration and Faculty 

Board of Faculty Welfare 

Chairman Caroline A. Dinegar 

Secretary Peter ]. Desio 

Sabbatical Leave Committee 

Chairman Dinwiddle C. Reams 

Tenure and Promotion Committee 

Chairman Burton C. Staugaard 

Secretary To The Faculty Caroi j Munro 

Faculty 1978-1979 

Arnold, Joseph ]., Associate Professor, Industrial Engineering B.S., M.S., 

Southern Connecticut State College 
Attard, Alfred E., Assistant Professor, Criminal Justice B.S., Queens 

College; M.A., Columbia University; Ph.D., Illinois Institute of Technology 
Bechir, M. Hamdy, Associate Professor, Civil Engineering 
■B.C.E., Cairo University; M.A.Sc, University of Toronto; Sc.D., 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology 
Beeken, Ramona, Assistant Professor, English 

B.S., Southern Connecticut State College; M.A., Trinity College 
Bell, Srllekha, Associate Professor, English 

B.A., M.A., University of Madras; M.A., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 
Bradshaw, Alfred, Associate Professor, Sociology 

B.A., Ph.D., Syracuse University 
Brady, Gene F., Associate Professor, Management Science 

B.S., University of Virginia; M.B.A., Wayne State University; 

Ph.D., University of Oregon 
Brody, Robert P., Associate Professor, Marketing 

B.A., Wesleyan University; M.B.A., University of Chicago; 

D.B.A., Harvard University 



162 



Faculty 



Brown, David, Professor, Psychology 

B.S., University of Connecticut; M.A., Columbia University 
Bums, Donald, Assistant Professor, Physical Education 
B.S., University of Connecticut; M.A., Teacher's College, 
Columbia University 
Carriuolo, Half E., Professor, Humanities 

B.A., Yale University; M.M., Hartt College; Ph.D., Wesleyan University 
Carson, George R., Associate Professor, Civil Engineering 

B.C.E., City College, New York; M.S.C.E., Colu.abia University 
Chandra, Satish, Associate Professor, International Business 
B.A., University of Delhi; M.A., Delhi School of Economics; LL.B., 
Lucknow Law School, India; LL.M., I.S.D., Yale University 
Chepaitis, Joseph, Professor, History 

A.B., Loyola College; M.A., Ph.D., Georgetown University 
Chun, Kee W., Professor, Physics 
A.B., University of Pennsylvania; A.M., Princeton University; 
Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 
Cole, Carroll P., Professor, English 
B.A., Pnncipia College; M.A., The Johns Hopkins University; 
M.F.A., D.F.A., Yale University 
Coleman, John R., Associate Professor, Public Administration 
B.S.E., University of Connecticut; M.S. I.E., University of 
Massachusetts; Ph.D., University of Massachusetts 
Collinson, John, Professor, Humanities 
A.B., The Johns Hopkins University; A.M., Harvard University; 
Ph.D., The Johns Hopkins University 
Costello, Francis J., Associate Professor, Industrial Engineering 

B.S.M.E., M.S.M.E., Newark College of Engineering 
Courtney, Dennis, Associate Professor, Psychology 

B.A., M.A., Wayne State University; Ph.D., Ohio State University 
Davis, George H., Associate Professor; Psychology 

B.A., M.S., Ph.D., Yale University 
Desio, Peter J., Associate Professor, Chemistry 

B.S., Boston College; Ph.D., University of New Hampshire 
Dinegar, Caroline A., Professor, Political Science 

B.A., Cornell University; M.A., Ph.D., Columbia University 
Domenburg, Noreen, Assistant Professor, Humanities 

B.A., Seton Hill College; M. Phil., Ph.D., Yale University 
Dull, James, Assistant Professor, Political Science 

B.A., Wilkes College; M.A., University of Pennsylvania 
Dworak, Robert J., Professor, Public Administration 
B.S., M.PA., Ph.D., University of Southern California 



163 



Board, Administration and Faculty 



Eichler, Marilyn, Assistant Professor, Criminal Justice 

B.A., M.S., City University of New York; Ph.D., New York University 
Eikaas, Faith H., Professor, Sociology 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Syracuse University 
Elting, Robert A., Associate Professor, Hotel Management 

B.S., M.S., Florida State University; Ph.D., New York University 
Farmer, Richard E., Assistant Professor, Criminal Justice 

A.B., St. Anselm's College; M.S., University of New Haven; 

Ed.D., Boston University 
Ferringer, Natalie, Assistant Professor, Political Science 

B.S., Temple University; M.A., University of Virginia 
Flaumenhaft, Frank, Assistant Professor, Management Science 

B.S., University of Pennsylvania; M.B.A., New York University 
Fox, Kenneth P., Assistant Professor, Public Administration 

B.A., Columbia College of Columbia University; Ph.D., University 

of Pennsylvania 
French, Bruce A., Assistant Professor, English 

A.B., University of Missouri; M.A., Western Reserve University; 

M.A., Middlebury College; M.A., Harvard University 
Frey, Roger G., Associate Professor, Industrial Engineering 

B.A., Yale College; M.S., Ph.D., Yale Graduate School 
Fryer, Johnnie, Assistant Professor, Political Science 

B.A., University of Connecticut; M.S., Southern Connecticut 

State College; M.A., New School For Social Research 
Gaensslen, Robert, Associate Professor, Criminal Justice 

B.S., University of Notre Dame; Ph.D., Cornell University 
Gangler, Joseph M., Professor, Mathematics 

B.S., University of Washington; M.A., Ph.D., Columbia University 
Gardner, Joan A., Assistant Professor, Fine Arts 

B.F.A., University of Illinois; M.F.A., University of Illinois 
George, Edward T, Professor, Industrial Engineering 

B.S., M.S., Worcester Polytechnic Institute; D. Engr. Yale University 
Gere, William S., Jr., Associate Professor, Industrial Engineering 

B.M.E., M.S. I.E., Cornell University, M.S., Ph.D., Carnegie- 
Mellon University 
Goodrow, Lloyd, Assistant Professor, Criminal Justice 

B.S., St. Michael's College; M.A., University of State of New York; 

J.D., University of Connecticut 
Gordon, Judith, Associate Professor, Sociology 

B.A., Brandeis University; M.A., University of Michigan; Ph. D., University 

of Michigan 



164 



Faculty 



Greet, Richard J., Associate Professor, Mechanical Engineering 
B.E.E., Rensselear Polytechnic Institute; M.S., Ph.D., Harvard 
University 

Grodzinsky, Stephen, Associate Professor, Electrical Engineering 
S.B., S.M., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Ph.D., 
University of Illinois 

Haberman, Ronald A., Assistant Professor, Industrial Engineering 
B.S.A.E., Pennsylvania State University; M.S.O.R., Florida 
Institute of Technology 

Harricharan, Wilfred R., Professor, Management Science 

B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Cornell University 
Harrison, Robert D., Assistant Professor, Political Science 

A.B., Amherst; M.A., Columbia University; M. Phil, Columbia 

University; J.D., Yale University 

Hay den, George, Assistant Professor, Criminal Justice 

M.A., Northeastern University; J.D., New England School of Law 
Hie key, Joseph E., Associate Professor, Criminal Justice 

A.B., St. John's Seminary; A.B., St. Anselm's College; M.S., Central Conn. 

State College, Ed.D., Boston University 
Hoffnung, Robert J., Associate Professor, Psychology 

A.B., Lafayette College; M.A., University of Iowa; Ph.D., 

University of Cincinnati 
Horning, Darrell W., Associate Professor, Electrical Engineering 

B.S.E.E., S.D. School of Mines; M.S.E.E., Ph.D., University of 

Illinois 

Howling, Robert T, Professor, English 

B.A., Rutgers University; M.A., New York University; Ph.D., 

Pennsylvania State University 
Hyman, Arnold, Associate Professor, Psychology 

B.A., M.A., Brooklyn College; M.S., City College of New York; 

Ph.D., University of Cincinnati 
Jensen, Gwendolyn E., Professor, History 

B.A., University of Hartford; M.A., Trinity College; Ph.D. 

University of Connecticut 
Jewell, Walter C, III, Associate Professor, Sociology 

A.B., Ph.D., Harvard 
Kakalik, John, Associate Professor, Marketing 

B.A., Ph.D., Michigan State University 
Kalma, Dennis L., Associate Professor, Science and Biology 

B.A., Knox College; M.S., Ph.D., Yale University 
Kaloyanides, Michael G., Assistant Professor, Humanities 

B.A., Ph.D., Wesley an Uruversity 



165 



Board, Administration and Faculty 



Kaplan, Phillip, Professor, Economics 

B.A., University of Massachusetts; M.A., Columbia University; 

Ph.D., The Johns Hopkins University 
Karatzas, George, Associate Professor, Economics 

B.A., Manchester University; M.A., Ph.D., New York University 
Katsaros, Thomas, Professor, History 

B.A., M.A., M.B.A., Ph.D., New York University 
Kayiira, Lutakome A., Assistant Professor, Cnminal Justice 

B.S., Southern Illinois University; M. A., Ph.D., State 

University of New York at Albany 
Kirwin, Gerald J., Professor, Electrical Engineering 

B.S., Northeastern University; M.S., Massachusetts Institute of 

Technology; Ph.D., Syracuse University 
Kleinfeld, Ira H., Associate Professor, Industrial Engineering 

B.S., M.S., Eng. Sc.D., Columbia University 
Kranyik, Cynthia, Instructor, Industrial Engineering 

B.A., University of Bridgeport; M.S., University of New Haven 
Lambrakis, Konstantine C, Professor, Mechanical Engineering 

B.S.E.E., M.S.M.E., University of Bridgeport; Ph.D., Rensselear 

Polytechnic Institute 
Lanius, Ross M., Jr., Associate Professor, Civil Engineering 

B.S.C.E., University of Delaware; M.S.C.E., University of 

Connecticut 
Lashgari, Malek K., Assistant Professor, Accounting 

B.S., University of Tehran— Iran; M.Ph., New York University; M.B.A., 

University of New Haven; Ph.D., New York University 
Lee, Henry C, Associate Professor, Criminal Justice 

A. A., Manhattan Community College; B.A., Taiwan Central 

Police College; B.S., John Jay College of Criminal Justice; M.S., 

Ph.D., New York University 
Logan, Lawrence, Assistant Professor, Accounting 

B.A., Holy Cross College; M.S.B.A., University of Massachusetts 
Lowe, Larry, Associate Professor, Marketing 

B.S., M.B.A., Portland State University; Ph.D., University of Washington 
Machnik, Joseph A., Associate Professor, Physical Education 

B.S., M.S., Long Island University; Ph.D., University of Utah 
Maffeo, Edward J., Assistant Professor, Fine Arts 

B.F.A., Rhode Island School of Design; M.A., Columbia University 
Mandour, Ahmed R., Associate Professor, Economics 

B.A., American University of Cairo; M.B.A., Ph.D., University 

of Oklahoma 



166 



Faculty- 



Mann, Richard A., Professor, Civil Engineering 

B.S.M.E., University of Wisconsin; M.S.M.E,, Northwestern University; 

Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 
Martin, John C, Professor, Civil Engineering 

B.E., M.E., Yale University 
Marx, Paul, Professor, English 

B.A., University of Michigan; M.F.A., University of Iowa; Ph.D., 

New York University 
Mathieu, Bertrand M., Professor, English 

B.A., Nasson College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Arizona 
McCrohan, Kevin, Associate Professor, Marketing /International Business 

B.S., New York University; M.B.A., M.B.A. in International Business, 

Baruch College; Certificate of Philosophy, City University 

of New York; Ph.D. New York University 
McLaughlin, Marilou, Associate Professor of Communication 

B.A., M.A., Villanova University; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 
Meier, Robert D., Associate Professor, Criminal Justice 

B.S., Ursinus College; M.A., Ph.D., Columbia University 
Mentzer, Thomas Lee, Associate Professor, Psychology 

B.S., Pennsylvania State University; M.S., Ph.D., Brown University 
Moffitt, Elizabeth J., Professor, Fine Arts 

B.F.A., Yale University; M.A., Hunter College 
Monahan, Lynn H., Assistant Professor, Criminal Justice 

B.A., McGill University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Oregon 
Montague, Richard A., Assistant Professor, Industrial Engineering 

B.S.I.E., University of New Haven; M.S. I.E., Columbia University 
Morris, Michael, Assistant Professor, Psychology 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Boston College 
Morrison, Richard C, Professor, Physics 

A.B., Princeton University; M.S., Ph.D., Yale University 
Naccarato, David, Assistant Professor, Mathematics 

B.A., St. Mary of the Plains College; M.A., Wichita State 

University 
Nordlund, Kai K., Associate Professor, Finance 

LL.B., University of Helsinki; LL.M., Columbia University; 

D.J.S., New York Law School 
Nyce, William H., Associate Professor, Chemistry 

B.S.Ch.E., University of Pennsylvania; M.S., Southern 

Connecticut State College 
O'Donnell, Margaret, Assistant Professor, Hotel Management 

B.A., Queens College; M.A., New York University 



167 



Board, Administration and Faculty 



O'Keefe, Daniel C, Associate Professor, Electrical Engineering 

B.E.E., City College of New York; M.S.E.E., Carnegie Mellon 

University; Ph.D., Worcester Polytechnic Institute 
Ormrod, Donald, Associate Professor, Physical Education 

B.S., University of Massachusetts; M.S., Southern Connecticut 

State College 
Osterweis, Rollin G., Adjunct Professor of History and Political 

Science 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Yale University 
Paelet, David, Associate Professor, Psychology 

B.S., M.S., City College of New York; Ph.D., University of Connecticut 
Pan, William, Assistant Professor, Management Science 

B.S., National Cheng Kung University; M.B.A., Auburn University 

Ph.D., Columbia University 
Parker, Joseph A., Professor, Economics 

B.A., Lehigh University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Oklahoma 
Parker, L. Craig, Jr., Associate Professor, Criminal Justice 

A.B., Bates College; M.Ed., Springfield College; Ph.D., State 

University of New York at Buffalo 
Pearson, Edwin, Assistant Professor, Criminal Justice 

B.S.M.E., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; J.D., 

Georgetown University Law Center; LL.M., Harvard Law School 
Plotnick, Alan, Professor, Economics 

B.A., Temple University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 
Poulson, Christian F., Assistant Professor, Management Science 

B.A., Boston University; M.A. Yale University 
M.B.A., University of New H^ven 
Rainish, Robert, Assistant Professor, Finance 

B.S., City College of New York; M.B.A., Baruch College, City 

University of New York 
Raucher, Steven A., Assistant Professor, Communication 

B.A., Queens College; M.S., Brooklyn College 
Reams, Dinwiddie C, Jr., Professor, Science and Biology 

B.Ch.E., University of Virginia; M.Eng., D.Eng., Yale University 
Reimer, Richard, Associate Professor, Accounting 

B.B.A., University of Commerce, Vienna; M.S., Columbia 

University 
Rich, Anne, Assistant Professor, Accounting 

B.A., Queens College; M.B.A., University of Bridgeport, Ph.D. University 

of Massachusetts 
Robillard, Douglas, Professor, English 

B.S., M.A., Columbia University; Ph.D., Wayne State University 



168 



Faculty 



Robin, Gerald D., Professor, Criminal Justice 

B.A., Temple University; M.A., Ph.D., University of 

Pennsylvania 
Ross, Bertram, Professor, Mathematics 

M.S., Wilkes College; M.S., Ph.D., Courant Institute of 

Mathematical Sciences, New York University 
Ross, Stephen M., Associate Professor, Mechanical Engineering 

B.E., New York University; Ph.D., The Johns Hopkins University 
Sack, AOen, Assistant Professor, Sociology 

B.A., University of Notre Dame; M.A., Ph.D., Pennsylvania State 

University 

Saleeby, B. Badri, Associate Professor, Mechanical Engineering 
B.S.M.E., Cooper Union; M.S.M.E., Ph.D., Northwestern University 

Sandman, Joshua H., Assistant Professor, Political Science 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., New York University 
Sarris, John, Assistant Professor, Mechanical Engineering 

B.A., Hamilton College; M.S., Ph.D., Tufts University 
Sawhney, Shiv. L., Professor, Management Science 

B.A., LL.B., Delhi University; M.B.A., Ph.D., New York University 
Schaefer, George, Assistant Professor, Business Administration 

B.S., University of Rochester; M.B.A., University of Bridgeport 
Sherwood, Franklin B., Professor, Economics 

B.A., M.A., University of Connecticut; Ph.D., University of Illinois 
Sloane, David E.E., Associate Professor, English 

B.A., Wesley an University; M.A., Ph.D., -Duke University 
Smith, Donald M., Assistant Professor, English 

A.B., Guilford College; A.M., Columbia University 
Smith, Warren J., Associate Professor, Business Administration 

B.S., University of Connecticut; M.B.A., Northeastern University 
Sommers, Alexis N., Professor, Industrial Engineering 

B.M.E., Cornell University; M.S., Rutgers University; Ph.D., 

Purdue University 

Sood, Sandhya M., Assistant Professor, Psychology 

B.A., St. Xavier's College, Bombay, India; M.S., University of 

Bombay; Ph.D., Cornell University 
Stanley, Richard M., Associate Professor, Mathematics 

B.E.S., The Johns Hopkins University; M.S., M.Phil., Ph.D., Yale 

University 

Staugaard, Burton C, Professor, Science and Biology 
A.B., Brown University; M.S., University of Rhode Island; Ph.D., 
University of Connecticut 



169 



Board, Administration and Faculty 



Surti, Kantilal K., Associate Professor, Electrical Engineering 

B.E., University of Gujarat, India; M.E.E., University of 

Delaware; Ph.D., University of Connecticut 
Teluk, John J., Associate Professor, Economics 

B.A., Graduate School of Economics, Munich; B.S., University of 

New Haven; M.A., Free University, Munich 
Theilman, Ward, Associate Professor, Economics 

B.A., Ph.D., University of Illinois 
Tyndall, Bruce, Professor, Mathematics 

B.A., M.S., University of Iowa 
Vasileff, Henry D., Associate Professor, Finance 

B.A., M.A., University of Toronto; M.B.A., University of 

Connecticut; Ph.D., University of Toronto 
Vieira, Frank, Associate Professor, Physical Education 

B.S., Ouinnipiac College; M.S., Southern Connecticut State College 
Voegeli, Henry E., Assistant Professor, Science and Biology 

B.A., University of Connecticut; Ph.D., University of Rhode Island 
Warner, Thomas C, Jr., Professor, Mechanical Engineering 

B.E., Yale University; M.S., Massachusetts Institute of 

Technology; Professional Engineer (Connecticut) 
Wentworth, Ronald N., Assistant Professor, Management Science 

B.S.M.E., Northeastern University, M.S. I.E., University of 

Massachusetts 
Werblow, Jack, Assistant Professor, Public Administration 

B.A., Cornell University; M.B.A., Wharton School of Finance; 

Ph.D., University of Cincinnati 
Wheeler, George L., Assistant Professor, Chemistry 

B.A., Catholic University of America; Ph.D., University 

of Maryland 
Whiteman, Gilbert L., Associate Professor, Communication 

B.Ed., University of Nebraska; M.A., University of Oklahoma; 

Ph.D., Michigan State University 
Wiener, Bernard, Associate Professor, Marketing 

B.S., M.B.A,, New York University 
Wiggins, Catherine, Assistant Professor, Public Administration 

B.S., Hampton Institute; M.S.W., University of Pennsylvania; Ph.D., 

New York University 
Williams, Jeffery L., Associate Professor, Accounting 

B.S., University of New Haven; M.B.A. , University of Bridgeport 
Wilson, Ned B., Associate Professor, Industrial Engineering 

B.Sc, M.Sc, Ph.D., Ohio State University 



170 



Faculty 



Wnek, Robert, Assistant Professor, Accounting 

B.S., Villanova University; J.D., Delaware Law School of Widener College; 

C.P.A. State of Conn. 
Wright, H. Fessenden, Professor, Science and Biology 

A.B., Oberlin College; M.S., Ph.D., Cornell University; F.A.I.C. 
Wynne, Michael ]., Assistant Professor, Sociology 

B.A., Fairfield University; M.S.S.A., Case Western Reserve 
Wynschenk, Donald, Associate Professor, Health and Physical Education 

B.S., M.S., Southern Connecticut State College 
Yanover, Ruth W., Associate Professor, Marketing 

B.A., M.A., University of Wisconsin 
York, Michael W., Associate Professor, Psychology 

B.A., M.A., Southern Methodist University; Ph.D., University of 

Maryland 
Zern, Martin M., Assistant Professor, Accounting 

B.S., New York University; J.D., Brooklyn Law School; 

LL.M., New York University 

Faculty Professional Licensure and Accreditation 

Bechir, M. Hamdy, Professional Engineer, Connecticut, Massachusetts, 

New Hampshire, Vermont, Oklahoma 
Brown, David, Consulting Psychologist, Connecticut 
Carson, George R., Professional Engineer, Connecticut, Massachusetts, 

New York, New Jersey; Landscape Architect, Connecticut; Land 

Surveyor, Connecticut, Massachusetts 
Courtney, Dennis, Consulting Psychologist, Connecttcut 
Kravet, Robert, Certified Public Accountant, Connecticut 
Lanius, Ross M., Jr., Professional Engineer, Connecticut, New Jersey 
Logan, Lawrence, Certified Public Accountant, Connecticut 
Mann, Richard A., Professional Engineer, Wisconsin 
Martin, John C, Professional Engineer, Connecticut, New York, Colorado, 

Pennsylvania 
O'Donnell, Margaret, Registered Dietitian 
Reimer, Richard, Certified Public Accountant, Connecticut 
Rich, Anne, Certified Public Accountant, Texas; Holder of 

Certificate in Management Accounting 
Ross, Bertram, Professional Engineer, New York, Ohio 
Warner, Thomas C, Jr., Professional Engineer, Connecticut 



171 



Board, Administration and Faculty 



Williams, Jeffery L., Certified Public Accountant, Connecticut; 

Holder of Certificate in Management Accounting 
Wright, H. Fessenden, Registered Chemical Consultant 
Zem, Martin M., Certified Public Accountant, New York; Attorney at Law, 

New York. 



Lecturers 

Aaronson, Peter B., Lecturer, Public Administration 

M.P.H.-M.H.A., Yale University; M.A., New York University 

Executive Director, New Haven County Medical Association and 

New Haven County Foundation for Medical Care 
Abbagnaro, Peter, Lecturer, Taxation 

B.S., Ouinnipiac College 
Affinito, Louis, Lecturer, Management Science 

B.A., Ouinnipiac College 

Assistant Administrator, Milford Hospital 
Aretakis, George, Lecturer, Public Administration 

B.S., New York University 

Consultant 
Bassett, Lawrence C, Lecturer, Hotel Management 

M.B.A., New York University 
Beck, Irving H., Lecturer, Public Administration 

M.S., University of Denver 

Finance Director Town of East Haven 
Beck, Robert M., Lecturer, Industrial Engineering 

M.S., University of New Haven 

Homeguity, Inc. 
Berecz, Victor G., Lecturer, Industrial Engineering 

M.S., Yale University 

Norden Division of United Technologies Corp. 
Blancato, James V., Lecturer, Public Administration 

B.S., Fordham University, M.A., New York University 

Public School Administrator, retired 
Bobko, John R., Lecturer, Industrial Engineering 

M.S., R.P.I. , Hartford Graduate Center 
Ciarlone, Richard, Lecturer, Management Science 

M.B.A., University of Maryland 

Senior Operations Research Analyst, Uniroyal Chemical 
Close, Richard T., Lecturer, Industrial Engineering 

Ph.D., Catholic University 



172 



Lecturers 



Connolly, John T, Lecturer, Criminal Justice 

Ph.B., Holy Cross College, M.A., Fordham University 

Retired Chief U.S. Probation Officer, Federal Court N.Y.C. 
Culhane, Michael C, Lecturer, Economics 

M.A., Fairfield University 

Arbitrator 
Dallob, David, Lecturer, Management Science 

M.B.A., Hofstra University 

Plant Manager, Wheeler Electronics, Division of Sperry-Rand 
DeMayo, William, Lecturer, Taxation 

M.B.A., New York University, C.P.A. 

Partner, Ernst & Ernst, Certified Public Accountants 
DeMichiell, Robert, Lecturer, Industrial Engineering 

Ph.D., University of Connecticut 

Director, Computer Center, United States Coast Guard Academy 
DeNardis, Lawrence J., Lecturer, Public Administration 

M.A., New York University 

State Senator, Hamden, CT 
DeSanto, R., Lecturer, Environmental Sciences 

Ph.D., Columbia University 

DeLeuw, Cather Co., Chief Ecologist 
Devaney, Earl J., Lecturer, Marketing 

M.B.A., University of Massachusetts 

Gerald Rosen Company 
Donohoe, Richard J., Lecturer, Marketing 

M.S., New York University 

President, R.J. Donohoe, Inc. 
Dnscoll, Vincent, Lecturer, Economics 

Ph.D., New School for Social Research 
Fisher, Henry, Lecturer, Public Administration 

L.L.B., Columbia University 

Partner Law Firm Ritter, Silverstone and Fisher 
Fox, Diana B., Lecturer, Public Administration 

M.S.W., Columbia University 

Program Supervisor, Fairfield Hills State Hospital 
Frascatore, Joseph C, Lecturer, Industrial Engineering 

M.S., University of New Haven 

Systems Consultant, Burroughs Corp. 
Fuchs, Leonard W., Lecturer, Accounting 

M.B.A., New York University 



173 



Board, Administration and Faculty 



Gavaghan, Thomas, Lecturer, Management Science 

M.B.A., University of Hartford 

Organizational Development Specialist SNETCO 
Gerdine, Philip V., Lecturer, Accounting 

Ph.D., Boston University; C.P.A.; 

Corporate Executive, General Electric Co. 
Gemer, William L., Lecturer, Taxation 

LD., St. John's University; (C.P.A., M.B.A., New York University) 

Director of Taxes, Connecticut General Life Insurance Company 
Ghattas, Reda R., Lecturer, Industrial Engineering 

M.S. I.E., Rutgers University 

Staff Supervisor, Industrial Engineering Department 

Pratt & Whitney Aircraft 
Greenberg, Richard, Lecturer, Accounting 

J.D., L.L.M., Boston University 

Assistant Attorney General State of Connecticut Banking Department 
Grodzinsky, Frances S., Lecturer, English 

M.A., University of Illinois 
Heinen, I. Stephen, Lecturer, Psychology 

Ph.D., Michigan State University 

Consultant, General Electric Company 
Hertel, Eugene S., Lecturer, Industrial Engineering 

M.S., North Carolina State University 

Research Engineer, Uniroyal Inc., Chemical Division 
Honig, Sandra, Lecturer, Marketing 

M.B.A., University of Connecticut 
James, William H., Lecturer, Economics 

Ph.D., Yale University 
Klein, James P., Lecturer, Taxation 

J.D., Columbia University, L.L.M. in Taxation N.Y. Univ. 
Kraus, John, Lecturer, Management Science 

M.B.A., University of Pennsylvania 
Ladd, Richard A., Lecturer, Economics 

Ph.D., University of Connecticut 
Lamberti, James T., Lecturer, Industrial Engineering 

M.S., Rutgers University 

Supervisor, Pratt & Whitney Aircraft 
Landry, Roger, Lecturer, Management Science 

M.B.A., University of Connecticut 

Director of Systems Development, St. Mary's Hospital 



174 



Lecturers 



Lanza, Gerald J., Lecturer, Industrial Engineering 

M.S., University of New Haven 

Micro Processor Design Manager Computer Optics, Inc. 
Laschever, Barnett D., Lecturer, Hotel Management 

Connecticut State Travel Director 
Manson, John R., Lecturer, Criminal Justice 

M.S., University of Bridgeport 

Commissioner, Connecticut Department of Correction 
Marchese, Michael J., Lecturer, International Business 

Master of International Management, American Graduate School of 

International Management 

International Officer, Union Trust Company 
Markle, Arnold, Lecturer, Criminal Justice 

L.L.B., Boston University 

State's Attorney for New Haven County 
McGuigan, Austin, Lecturer, Criminal Justice 

J.D., Boston University School of Law 

Chief State's Attorney State of Connecticut 
O'Connor, Frank, Lecturer, Sociology * 

M.S.W., University of Connecticut 
O'Neil, Dennis, Lecturer, Psychology 

M.A., University of New Haven 
Ostroske, Kenneth, Lecturer, Accounting 

J.D., University of Connecticut, C.P.A. State of Connecticut 

Tax Manager, Arthur Young & Company 
Pae, Ki-Tai, Lecturer, Economics & Management Science 

Ph.D., University of Connecticut 
Pagliaro, Frank C, Lecturer, Public Administration 

A.S., University of New Haven 

Director Fiscal Services, Griffin Hospital Inc. 
Parrella, Sharon Gilchrest, Lecturer, Psychology 

M.A., University of New Haven 

Director of Human Resources the Conn. Hospice, Inc. 
Perry, Lee, Lecturer, Psychology 

M.A., Brig ham Young University 
Puleo, Joseph A., Lecturer, Accounting 

M.B.A., City University of New York; C.P.A. 
Reid, Thomas A., Lecturer, Psychology 

Psy.D., University of Illinois 

Director, Hamden Mental Health Service 



175 



Board, Administration and Faculty 



Rezendes, Dennis, Lecturer, Public Administration 

M.G.A., University of Pennsylvania 

Administrator, Hospice, Inc. 
Roble, Ahmed M., Lecturer, Economics 

Ph.D., University of Connecticut 
Rosen, Stephen S., Lecturer, Civil and Environmental Engineering 

Ph.D., Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn 

Chief Environmental Engineer, Parsons, Brinkerhoff 
Ryack, Bernard L., Lecturer, Industrial Engineering 

Ph.D., University of Massachusetts 

Assistant Chief, Human Factors Division, Naval Submarine 

Medical Research Laboratory 
Ryba, Walter, Lecturer, Economics 

Ph.D., Fordham University; J.D., University of Connecticut 
Scalia, Frank A., Lecturer, Psychology 

Ph.D., Carnegie -Mellon University 

Ass't. Vice President, Human Resources Development, Connecticut Mutual 

Life Insurance Company 
Schwartz, Robert, Lecturer, Political Science 

J.D., Rutgers Law School 

Manpower Dem. Res. Corp. 
Selcoe, Theresa L., Lecturer, Hotel Management 

A.B., University of California at Berkeley 

Vice President, Applied Leadership Technologies 
Shah, Kiran K., Lecturer, Marketing 

M.S., Northwestern University; M.B.A., University of New Haven 

Asset Manager, Uniroyal Chemical 
Shapazian, Kenneth C, Lecturer, Finance 

M.B.A., University of Connecticut 
Silbert, Jonathan E., Lecturer, Criminal Justice 

J.D., Harvard Law School 

Partner, Garrison, Kahn, Crane & Silbert, Attorneys at Law 
Steinberg, Marvin A., Lecturer, Psychology 

Ph.D., University of Texas 

Assistant Director, Hamden Mental Health Service 
Stergianopoulos, P.G., Lecturer, Economics 

M.B.A., City University, N.Y., Baruch College 
Tatangelo, George, Lecturer, Industrial Engineering 

B.S., Central Connecticut State College 

M.B.A., University of Bridgeport 



176 



Lecturers 



iobin, Joseph M., Lecturer, Business Law 

J.D., Fordham University 

Tobin & Levine, Attorneys at Law 
Todt, Malcolm S., Lecturer, Accounting 

M.B.A., Babson College; C.M.A. 

Assistant Treasurer, Insilco Corporation 
Tolonen, Karl, Lecturer, Environmental Sciences 

Ph.D., Yale University 

Postdoctoral. Fellow, Yale Medical School 

Welch, Richard, Lecturer, Economics 

M.S., Southern Connecticut State College 
Welsh, Walter C, Lecturer, Accounting 

L.L.M. (in Taxation) New York University School of Law; J.D. University 

of Connecticut Law School 
Weybrew, Benjamin B., Lecturer, Psychology 

Ph.D., University of Colorado 

Head, Psychological Research, U.S. Navy Submarine Medical Research 

Laboratory 

Wolcin, Joseph J., Lecturer, Industrial Engineering 

Ph.D., Yale University 

Research Mathematician, Naval Underwater Systems Center 
Woods, Jimmie, D., Lecturer, Industrial Engineering 

Ph.D., University of Connecticut 
Zadravec, Edward, Lecturer, Management Science 

M.B.A., University of Bridgeport 

Director of Employee Relations, Olin, Winchester Division 
Zottola, Armand, Lecturer, Economics 

Ph.D., Catholic University of America 



177 



Index 



INDEX 



A 

A course prefixes 93 

Academic administration 1 54 

Academic calendar vi 

Academic counseling 12 

Academic policies 12 

Academic standards 14 

Accounting 
Concentration in the M.B. A. Program 44 

Course descriptions (A) . 93 

M.S. degree program 40 

Accounting and taxation senior professional 

Certificate 83 

Accreditation of the university 3 

Activities 28 

Administration 150 

Administrative studies concentration in 

the gerontology program 69 

Admission 

Application blanks 1 85 

General requirements 8 

Categones 9 

International students 1 

Procedure 9 

Afftrmative action 4 

Alumni association '30 

Appeals of probation 14 

Applications of psychology senior 

professional certificate 84 

Arts and Sciences, School of 5 

Athletics 30 

Auditors ' JO 

Awarding of degrees 12 



B 

Biology, environmental studies 

and general science course 

descriptions (SCj 141 

Board of Governors 147 

Bookstore 31 

Business Administration, School of 5 

Business administration /industnal 

engineering dual degree program 49 

Business administration, 

master's degree program 42 

Business and financial administration 1 58 

Business law course descnptions (XiAj 122 



c 

Calendar, academic vi 

Cancellation of classes 36 

Career development and 

off -campus employment 32 

Categories of admission . 9 

CE course prefixes . 97 

C// course prefixes 98 

Chaplains 33 

Chariot, student yearbook 29 

Chemistry course descriptions (CH) 98 

Civil and environmental engineering 

course descnptions (CE) 97 

C/ course prefixes 99 

Clubs and organizations 28 

CO course prefixes 1 03 

Committees 

Board of Governors 149 

University . 149 

Communication course descnptions (CO) 1 03 
Community psychology, 

MA. degree program 51 

Completion of degree requirements, 

time limit 16 

Computer and information science 
Concentration in the M.B. A. program 45 

M.S. degree program 54 

Computer applications and information 

systems senior professional certiticate 84 

Computer facilities 33 

Concentrations in the MA. in gerontology 
program 

Administrative studies 69 

Psycho -social relations 68 

Concenh-ations in the MBA. Program 
Accounting 44 

Computer and information science 45 

Economic forecasting 45 

Fmance 45 

Health care management 45 

Hotel management, tounsm and travel 46 

International business 46 

Management and organization 46 

Management science 47 

Marketing 47 

Media in business 47 

Operations research 47 

Cooperative education program 20 

Councils 28 



178 



Index 



Counseling 

Academic 12 

Personal 34 

Course descriptions 

Accounting (A) 93 

Biology, environmental studies 

and general science fSCJ 141 

Business law (LA) 122 

Chemistry (CH) 98 

Civil and environmental 

engineering (CE) 97 

Communication (CO) 103 

Criminal justice (C]) 99 

Economics ffCyl 105 

English rf; 105 

Electrical engineering (EE) 108 

Environmental engineering (CE) 97 

Environmental science (SO 141 

Executive M.B.A. (EXID) 110 

Finance (F/j 112 

General science ("SCj 141 

Hotel management, tourism 

and travel rMW ' 114 

Humanities (HW 115 

International business (IB) 116 

Industrial engineering (IE) 117 

\a^(LA) 122 

Mathematics (M) 122 

Mechanical engineering (ME) 123 

Management science {MG,j 125 

Marketmg rMA'; 128 

PhysicsffW; 138 

Political science (PS) 1 38 

Psychology (P) 130 

Public Administration (PA) 134 

Quantitative Analysis rOi4j 140 

Science rSC; 141 

Sociology (SO) 142 

Social Welfare (SW 144 

Criminal justice 

Course descriptions (CJ) 99 

Division of 6 

M.S. degree program 56 

Cultural activities 26-28 



Degree programs, see 

Programs of study 
Degree requirements 13 

Time Umit for completion of 16 

Division of Criminal lushce 6 

Dormitory, see 

Housing 
Dual degree program 49 



£■ course prefixes 105 

EC course prefixes 105 

Economic forecasting 
Concentration in the MB. A program 45 

Senior professional certificate 85 

Economics course descnptions (EC) 1 05 

££ course prefixes 108 

Electncal engineering 

Course descriptions ^££7 108 

M.S. degree program 58 

Eligibility for financial aid 20 

Emergency closing notification 36 

Employment placement 27 

Engineenng, School of 6 

English course descriptions r£7 105 

Environmental engineering. 

Course descriptions (CE) 97 

M.S. degree program 60 

Environmental sciences. 

Course descriptions (SC^ 141 

M.S. degree program 62 

Environmental shidies course 

descriptions fSCJ 141 

Ethics 16 

Executive Master of Business Adminish-ation 
Course descriptions rfX/Dj 110 

Degree program 63 

fXro course prefixes 110 



F 

Faculty 161 

Faculty professional licensure 

and accreditation 171 

Fees 17 

FI Course prefixes 112 

Finance 

Concenh-ation in the MBA. program 45 

Course descriptions (FI) 112 

Senior professional certihcate 85 

Financial accounting option, 

accounting and taxation senior 

professional certificate 83 

Financial support for graduate stijdy 19 

Foreign Shjdents, see International students 
Forensic science, 

M.S. degree program 65 

Full-time study 8 

Fully matnculated student 9 



179 



Index 



General information, Graduate School 8 

General management senior 

professional certificate 85 

General science course 

descnpbons (SC) 141 

Gerontology, MA degree program 67 

Grade reports 13 

Grading system 13 

Graduate School 8 

Graduate School ethics 16 

Graduate School council 28 

Grants 19,22 



H 

Handicapped services 36 

Health care management concentration 
In the MB A program 45 

In the MP. A. program 81 

History of the university 1 

HM Course prefixes 114 

Hotel management, tourism and travel 
Concentration in the M B A program 46 

Course descriptions (HM) 1 1 4 

Option in the MB, A program 48 

Housing 35 

HU Course Prefixes 115 

Humanities 

Course descnptions (HU) 115 

MA degree program 65 



I 

IB course prehxes 116 

/£ course prefixes 117 

In-process registration 10 

Independent stijdy 16 

Industrial Engineenng 

Course descnptions (IE) 1 1 7 

MS degree program 70 

Industrial relations, MS Degree Program 72 

International Business 

Concentration in the MB A program 46 

Course descnpbons (7Bj 116 

Senior professional certificate 86 

International shidents 
Admission 10 

aticeof 35 



Job placement of shjdents 



LA course prefixes 

Law course descnpbons (LA) 

Law Enforcement Assistance Program 

Lecturers 

LEEP 

Library 

Living costs 

Loans 



27 



19 



122 
122 
21 
172 
21 
35 
18 
21 



M 



M course prefixes 


199 


M.A. degree programs, see 




Master o/ Arts degree programs 




Management and organization 




concentration m the M B A program 


42 


Management Science 




Concentration in the MBA. program 


46 


Course descnptions (MG) 


125 


Managenal accounting option, accounting 




and taxation senior professional 




certiticate 


84 


Map of the university 


23 


Marketing 




Concentration in the MBA. program 


46 


Course descnptions (MK) 


128 


Option, marketing senior professional 






86 


Senior professional certificate 


86 


Master of Arts degree programs 




Community psychology 


, 51 


Gerontology 


67 


Humanibes 


69 


Organizabonal/industnal psychology 


77 


Master of Business Administration 


42 


Master of Business Administration 




for Executives degree program 


63 


Master of Business Administration/Master 




of Science in Industnal Engineenng 




dual degree 


49 


Master of Public Administration 




degree program 


80 


Master of Science Degree Programs 




Accounting 


40 


Computer and information science 


54 



180 



Index 



Criminal justice 56 

Electrical engineenng 58 

Environmental engineenng 60 

Environmental sciences 62 

Forensic science 65 

Industnal engineenng 70 

Industnal relations 72 

Mechanical engineering 74 

Operations research 75 

Taxation 88 

Mathematics course descnptions (M) 122 

MBA 42 

ME course prefixes 123 

Mechanical engineering 
Course descnptions (ME) 123 

M.S. degree program 74 

Media in business concentration m the M.B.A. 

program 47 

MG course prefixes 125 

Minonty student affairs 36 

M^ course prefixes 128 

M.P. A. degree program 80 

M.S degree programs, see 
Master of Science degree programs 



N 

New Haven region 25 

News, Student Newspaper 29 

Newletters, career development 32 

Noiseless Spider, student 

literary publication 29 



Off -campus employment office 32 

On-campus recruitment 32 

Operations Research 

Concentrationin the M.B.A. program . 47 

M.S. degree program 75 

Option in the M.B.A. program in hotel 

management 48 

Organizational /industrial psychology, 

M. A. degree program 77 



P 

P course prefixes 1 30 

PA course prefixes 1 34 

Payment of tuition and fees 18 



Personal counseling 34 

P/y course prefixes 138 

Philosophy of the university . 3 

Physically handicapped students 36 

Physics course descnptions (PH) 1 38 

Placement of graduates 32 

Political science course 

descnptions fPS; 138 

Probation and appeals 14 

Professional Studies and 

Continuing Education, School of 7 

Programs of study 

Accounting 40 

Business administrabon 42 

Business administration/Industrial 

engineenng dual degree 49 

Community psychology 51 

Computer and information science 54 

Criminal justice 56 

Electncal engineenng 58 

Environmental engineering 60 

Environmental sciences 62 

Executive master of business 
administration 63 

Forensic science 65 

Gerontology 67 

Humamties 69 

Industnal engineering 70 

Industnal relations 72 

Mecharucal engineering 74 

Operations research 75 

Organizational/industnal psychology . 77 

Public administration 80 

Senior professional certificates 82 

Taxation 88 

Provisional student 9 

PS course prefixes 138 

Psycho-social relations concentration 

in the gerontology program 68 

Psychology course descnptions (P) 1 30 

Public administration 

Course descnptions (T-yi/* 134 

Master's degree program 80 

Public management senior 

professional certificate • 87 

Public personnel management option, 
public management senior professional 

certificate 87 

Publications 29, 32 



Q 



QA course prefixes 140 



181 



Index 



Quantitative analysis 




option . . 


87 


Course descnptions (QA) 


140 


Quantitative analysis 


88 


Senior professional certificate 


88 


Services for students 


25 


Quantitative techniques in 




Snow closing notification 


36 


marketing option, marketing 




Special student 


10 


senior professional certificate . . 


86 


SO course prefixes 


142 






Social activities 


29 






Social welfare course descriptions (SW) 


144 


R 




Sociology course descriptions (SO) 


142 




Standing committees of the university 


149 






Student activities and other services 


25 


Radio station WNHU 


29 


Student affairs administration 


159 


Rathskeller 


30 


Student center 


29 


Refunds of tuition 


18 


Student Handbook 


29 


Registration procedures 


12 


Survey of the field option. 




Repetition of work 


14 


public management senior 




Requirements for admission 


8 


professional certificate 


87 


Research projects, seminar protects 




S W course prefixes 


144 


and independent study 


16 






Residency requirements 


16 







s 

SC course prefixes 141 

Schools of the university 

Arts and Sciences 5 

Business Administration 5 

Engineenng 6 

Graduate 8 

Professional Studies and Continuing 
Education 7 

Science course descnptions (SC) 1 4 1 

Seminar projects 16 

Senior professional cerbficates 82 

Accounting and taxation 83 

Financial accounting opbon 83 

Managenal accounting option , . 83 

Taxation option 84 

Applications of psychology 84 

Computer applications and 

information systems 84 

Economic forecasting 85 

Finance 85 

General management 85 

International business 86 

Marketing 86 

Marketing option 86 

Quantitative techniques in 

marketing option 86 

FYiblic management 

Survey of the field option 87 

Urban and regional planning 

and management option 87 

Public personnel management 



T 

Taxation 

M.S. degree program 88 

Option, accounting and taxation senior 

professional certihcate . . 84 

Testing 34 

Thesis requirements 15 

Time limit for completion of 

degree requirements 16 

Title IX 4 

Title XX funds 22 

Transfer credit 15 

Transportation 26 

Tuition and Fees 17 



u 



Urban and regional planning and 
management option, public management 
senior professional certificate 87 



Veterans affairs 



36 



w 

Waiver of courses 15 

Withdrawal from the university 18 

WNHU radio 29 



182 



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